#1
I really need to come up with some clever and creative chord progressions for a couple songs. The thing is, I hate barre chords. We all know that open chords ring out and sound way better. I found a cool web page that somewhat explains how to do this;

http://www.guitarhabits.com/10-ways-to-play-the-most-beautiful-open-chord-shapes/

On this page, it only gives you a few keys with nice chord progressions, and they all sound really good, but I want to be able to do this with any key I please. It just sucks because I'd like to have some good creative open chord progressions for the key of A minor and C minor. If you have no clue what my dumb-ass is trying to say, just check out the site, that should give you an idea of what I'm talking about. Any help at all, any other links will be appreciated.
Thanks!
“If it seems like you are playing around and not practicing, that's when you know you really love it.”
-Jack Johnson

Quote by lattea
i'm kinda gay

Quote by angusfan16
Well damn. You caught me. I'm horribly gay.

RIP Rev
#3
I don't know that open chords sound way better.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#4
Quote by supersac
that^
also learn barre chords


I'm not retarded. I've known barre chords for 6 years, i just hate them
“If it seems like you are playing around and not practicing, that's when you know you really love it.”
-Jack Johnson

Quote by lattea
i'm kinda gay

Quote by angusfan16
Well damn. You caught me. I'm horribly gay.

RIP Rev
#6
Quote by Kynyster_K
I really need to come up with some clever and creative chord progressions for a couple songs.


then go learn theory and learn to form voicings as you need them.

also, if your barre chords aren't ringing out, you're probably doing it wrong.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#7
String skipping and inventive rhythm can turn a handful of boring, been played to death chord degrees and make something unique.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#8
As John McLaughlin said, "If you want to learn your chords, learn your scales first." You can make all sorts of chords once you know the 7ish notes of most scales and how to hear octaves.
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads
#9
well you cant really do it in every key or every situation. you can only do it in a key that the open strings apply to. the only thing you could do for doing it in more keys would be down tuning or using a capo. so if you know some nice voicings but they work in E but want them in G, slap on a capo. or if you wanted them in D, you could tune to D standard.

i dont know if open string chords sound "better", but i personally try to find ways to use them whenever i can. especially on acoustic because it takes away some of the choppyness that acoustic guitar rhythm can have. also, it makes it sound fuller if you are playing alone because there are usually wider intervals.
#10
I'd say that there definitely is something distinct in the tonal quality of open strings ringing out. I think that this is mainly what people are refering to when they think of open chords as sounding good.

As others have said, if you know your theory and are used to the fretboard, you can basically find any chord shape you want. I could endlessly tab out some open chord shapes for you, but it seems like you need to develope the knowledge so that I wouldn't have to.

Furthermore, just being shown a nice chord in isolation won't necessarily leave you knowing what to do with it - it'd just be a curiosity to bust out by itself. That's kind of what the link you gave does.

That said, the first thing that I'm tempted to point to is a concept used in "planeing", which isn't exactly playing chords in the normal sense. It's something a guitar teacher showed me years ago. The concept is to take a scale or mode and pick a certain interval. Then you take that interval and play with it in parallel with the scale while having an additional open string ringing out against it the whole time. Playing around with this is called "planeing". It's basically double stops against a pedal note.

So if I were to take E dorian, the interval of a 6th, and have the G string ringing out open the whole time, I'd find these "shapes":

x
x-2-3-5-7-8-10-12-
x-0-0-0-0-0-0---0-
x-2-4-5-7-9-11-12-
x
x
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Sep 12, 2011,