#1
Recently, I've been trying go for a more SRV type tone, but a Les Paul through Tiny Terror will only go so far. I'm planning on picking up a Blues Junior tweed and having a couple Billm mods done to it, and of course getting a strat. I'm wondering which makes the bigger difference in tone, since I can't afford both at once. Also, are the Mexican strats worth it, or should I just save for an American? Thanks.
#6
I have a Deluxe Lonestar Strat with Texas Specials in it. Any amp I've played it through, as long as I could get very mild overdrive, I could nail the SRV tone.

Food for thought.
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Last edited by Ayses at Sep 9, 2011,
#7
Quote by tylerjenns
Right^ Texas specials

I don't like them. There are better pickups out there for getting that Texas blues sound, IMO. Best pickups I've ever had in all my years of owning Strats were a set of Stephens Design custom-made handwound pickups. He specializes in blues-oriented single coils.
Hi, I'm Peter
#8
According to SRV's guitar tech, Cesar Diaz, the trick to getting that tone is hiring Cesar Diaz as your guitar tech.
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#9
Quote by tylerjenns
Right^ Texas specials



Yes. I have Texas Specials in an MIA Strat, into a TS clone (a good one), into a Blues Junior.

Its not bad at all, but the the same rig into a super reverb is just sex. The blues junior is good, but I'm not sold on it for an SRV tone. It is cheap however, and a speaker change might help... Once I have some cash.
#10
Quote by Dirk Gently
I don't like them. There are better pickups out there for getting that Texas blues sound, IMO. Best pickups I've ever had in all my years of owning Strats were a set of Stephens Design custom-made handwound pickups. He specializes in blues-oriented single coils.


In fairness, those sets seem to be twice the price of the Fender Texas Specials...
#11
Quote by hawk5211
In fairness, those sets seem to be twice the price of the Fender Texas Specials...


Yes, but from the demos, the user accounts and the one set I tried, the tone on those are really stellar. They sound much much better than the Texas Heat IMO. They have some of the best pushed SC sounds I've ever come across.

BTW TS, you're gonna need a TubeScreamer too. It was an integral part of Stevie's rig.
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#14
Quote by AeolianSeventh
According to SRV's guitar tech, Cesar Diaz, the trick to getting that tone is hiring Cesar Diaz as your guitar tech.




for srv, though... ideally you'd have both the strat and fender amp, though i think if i had to pick... i'd go with the strat.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
In this case I think the guitar makes more of a difference than the amp. I can get an almost SRV ish tone out of my 6505+ of all things - the only thing missing is that strat sound, which can't be done by my Les Paul.
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#18
wow i didn't realise srv was trying to nail that robben ford chirp
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#19
Quote by hawk5211
In fairness, those sets seem to be twice the price of the Fender Texas Specials...

Very true, they are expensive. But for that extra $100, you're getting to communicate directly with the pickup manufacturer, tell him exactly what you're looking for, and then get the ability to have them rewound for free if you get them and you don't like the tone. To me, that's better than going to a big box store and essentially using trial and error buying a set of the countless mass-produced pickups on the market. Also, think about it this way -- I've tried probably 10 different pickups in my Strats, never finding the tone I was looking for. Then I got a set of Stephens Design overwound Mojo V pickups and I stopped looking. Had I done that a long time ago, I would've actually saved myself a ton of money and frustration.
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Sep 10, 2011,
#20
Quote by AcousticMirror
dumble.


yuhhh. This or a marshall.

Don't forget to have 13 gauge strings.

Also wear a hat. And buy a 1974 Tube Screamer.
#22
According to Stevie's tech, they only ever used the Marshall in the studio, and only occasionally. Also they were all modded to sound more "American."

According to Mr. Diaz, SRV used underwound pickups exclusively, just like Hendrix. Then he turned his amps up harder to get overdrive. Based on my own experimentation, that provides a clearer, more articulate tone, with a slight midrange scoop. So if you're looking for Stevie's sound, look for a 50s-style Strat, nothing overwound or "hot." He also exclusively used gray coily cables from Radioshack, because they gave him a subtle treble rolloff, and specifically hated Monster cables because they let "too much electricity" through.
Money beats soul every time.

Money beats soul...every time.

Money...beats soul...every...goddamn...time.
#23
i'm only going to pick on a couple people here, mainly because i'm pretty sure they can take it. but the amount of wrong is pretty amazing. especially for the people posting. i'll get back with your question in a minute. i have to bitch slap some people first.

Quote by 00_hns_00
he had marshalls, fenders, and dumbles.

his main was a dumble.

while you are correct that he used all three, as far as the dumble - no it wasn't. he didn't start in austin playing dumbles. he played, and preferred, vibroverbs and super reverbs. he's used twins but they weren't his favorites by any means.

he thought the dumble sounded like sex, don't get me wrong.

very late in his career he was working with Mike Soldano on a custom version of the SLO to simplify his rig. sadly, he died before it was incorporated into his rig.

Quote by Zoot Allures
I heard somewhere he used to go up to the amp and run his fingers along all the dials so they were all turned up to full.

that was his blues breaker for voodoo chile. that's it.
he didn't really use the marshall for much else, it was there for his jimi tone. but you are right about the finger thing.

Quote by AcousticMirror
dumble.

not even close, stop posting that. go read something about teflon.

Quote by Dirk Gently
Overwound single coils, specifically.

not really, quite the opposite. his #1 had original fender 1959 strat pups in it. they were by no means "overwound".

i would say that lollar blondeface or fender CS 50s would be good choices.

Quote by tylerjenns
Right^ Texas specials

no. just no. i know that fender put them in his sig guitar, and he did like how that guitar sounded, but it wasn't his choice. see above.


a forgotten ingredient in the SRV cocktail is volume. amps turned up to the edge of break up volume.


ok now that that's out of the way.

a les paul and a TT are about as far from what most people know as a SRV tone as you could get.

on the cheap i would consider a used classic vibe 50's or 60's strat and that mod'd blues jr. i wouldn't bother putting myself through the rigors of 13 gage strings. remember he tuned a half step down so the 13s weren't as brutal as people think. that said, i'd go with heavy core 11 gage and tune those a half step down.

*all apologies to anyone who get's butthurt from this post, i've read a great deal on the man, watched countless videos and had the good fortune of seeing him play live. RIP stevie.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
Last edited by gregs1020 at Sep 10, 2011,
#25
Quote by AcousticMirror
when i typed dumble...

I meant srv's awesome hat.

and play in the rain.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#26
The reason I say "overwound" is because I think it's easier for your average player who doesn't crank their amp to get power tube distortion to get that fatter sound with overwounds. There's obviously a difference between having an authentic SRV setup and getting a tone that is relatively akin to SRV's fat, sizzling Texas blues sound.
Hi, I'm Peter
#27
Quote by Dirk Gently
The reason I say "overwound" is because I think it's easier for your average player who doesn't crank their amp to get power tube distortion to get that fatter sound with overwounds.

no hate intended. i have nothing but respect for you.

in the end i don't really think the pups matter that much when someone is trying to nail a type of tone on a budget like the ts. the amp is more important imo, and almost any half way decent single coil will do in the end, which is why i rec'd a squier cv.


i'm not here to be mr i know everything because i don't. i do know a fair bit from studying his rig over the years and being a big fan. i'm not going to keep posting here, i've given my thoughts. everyone has the right to disagree with me. (i'm not saying you are pete, just saying in general.)
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
Last edited by gregs1020 at Sep 10, 2011,
#28
Quote by gregs1020
no hate intended.

None perceived.
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Sep 10, 2011,
#29
group hug

oh and a tubescreamer (or similar) helps a fair bit too
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#30
Quote by Dirk Gently
I don't like them. There are better pickups out there for getting that Texas blues sound, IMO. Best pickups I've ever had in all my years of owning Strats were a set of Stephens Design custom-made handwound pickups. He specializes in blues-oriented single coils.


Well, that's what SRV used, Texas Specials in a 60 something Strat. Single coils is the biggest part of getting the SRV tone, humbuckers just can't get the twang.
#31
Just get a Strat with overwound pickups and set your amp for a light overdrive. Put the Strat on the middle pickup and hit the hell out of the strings. Bam.
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#32
Quote by ethan_hanus
Well, that's what SRV used, Texas Specials in a 60 something Strat.

No, he didn't. SRV never used "Texas Specials" pickups. Those are the pickups Fender developed on their own in an effort to replicate SRV's fatter sound.
Hi, I'm Peter
#33
Quote by gregs1020

while you are correct that he used all three, as far as the dumble - no it wasn't. he didn't start in austin playing dumbles. he played, and preferred, vibroverbs and super reverbs. he's used twins but they weren't his favorites by any means.


i am butthurt..... nah just kidding.


i was under the impression that the dumble became his main, and before that his main was a super reverb. i was also informed that dumbles are very similar to super reverbs.

i could totally be wrong, so please if i am, give me some links or something proving otherwise, cause i don't want to sprout out stupidity.
#34
GUITAR WORLD in September 1983, written by Frank Joseph:
For the Bowie album Vaughan played through a rented post-CBS Super Reverb; for the tour, he says, he "just bought two MESA/BOOGIEs. I don't even know what models they are--they're the small wooden ones. The reason I'm using them is they sound a lot like a Dumble. But that doesn't mean I'm not going to buy a Dumble as soon as I get the money!"

GUITAR PLAYER in 1984. The interviewer is Dan Forte
Right now, I use a Howard Dumble 150-watt. He calls it the Steel String Singer; I call it the King Tone Consoul [laughs]--that's s-o-u-l. It's like an overgrown Fender tube amp. Some Dumbles, like the Overdrive Special, you got to know what you're doing with them, because they'll get away from you and take you with 'em.

He says it's like an overgrown fender amp
RIP Gooze

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#36
before the internet got big, i used to read guitar magazines and watch concert videos like crazy.

here are some good sites, i've found the wiki page isn't that bad either.

there is always inconsistencies with srv info depending on the source, he used a lot of different gear over the years.

http://www.stevieray.com/gear.htm

http://www.angelfire.com/ks/keithcjulian/srvfaq5a.htm

http://www.uberproaudio.com/who-plays-what/162-stevie-ray-vaughan-guitar-gear-rig-and-equipment

http://www.djnoble.demon.co.uk/ints/STEVIER.VS.html

http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyle/Features/myth-busters-stevie-ray/

those are some i've read, there are probably a few you tube vids you can search as well.

I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#37
Quote by Dirk Gently
No, he didn't. SRV never used "Texas Specials" pickups. Those are the pickups Fender developed on their own in an effort to replicate SRV's fatter sound.


Then why didn't they just use the pickups he was actually using? Seems to me that'd be the easiest way to replicate his sound.
#38
Quote by ethan_hanus
Then why didn't they just use the pickups he was actually using? Seems to me that'd be the easiest way to replicate his sound.

You can't just "replicate" actual vintage pickups, at least not cost-efficiently. Second, as outlined thoroughly in this thread, SRV got his tone by cranking his amps. Most guitar players don't do that. Therefore, they probably just wanted to get close to his sound in a way that's accessible to most hobby guitarists.
Hi, I'm Peter
#39
Strat with Texas Special pups into a tube screamer into a Fender Vibroverb with a 15 inch speaker.
That will give you the SRV tone without a doubt. You could also get away with using a Twin Reverb if you can't get a hold of a Vibroverb.
Last edited by sparkeyjames at Sep 10, 2011,
#40
Step 1: Buy a Strat. MIM is fine, maybe even an old Japanese or Korean Strat. I've played a few MIM, MIJ, and MIK Fenders that I'd put up to any American any day.

Step 2: String your Strat with the cables used to hold up bridges. They're almost as heavy as the strings SRV used.

Step 3: Buy a Fender tube amp, preferably one of the blackface styles rather than the Tweeds.

Step 4: Get 2 old Tube Screamers, modded modern Tube Screamers (TS9 or TS808), or boutique Tube Screamer clones.

Step 5: Move to Austin, TX, develop enough strength in your left hand to bend your bridge cables and/or crush Chuck Norris' hand, wear an awesome hat, and get bluesy.

Sidenote
Greg, that's awesome that you got to see SRV live. He inspired me to take guitar playing seriously and I'd give just about anything to have been able to see him play.
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Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray