#1
ive been looking at blocking a floyd, rather than buying a new guitar entirely, and i was just curious about all the benefits and side effects. does this mean i wont have to do all the stupid tuning tricks and have intonation problems? does it mean that i can just tune to a different tuning and its like a hardtail or a TOM? and what about the cons? thanks!
-Gibson SG Faded
-Ibanez RG5EX1L
-Custom Upside-Down Strat
-Modded Epiphone LP
-Fender Acoustic
*Marshall DSL15H
>Ibanez TS9
>MXR Micro Flanger
>Boss TU-3
>Danelectro Vibe
>Guyatone ST-2 Comrpessor
#2
Yes, if you do it well you can tune it like a hardtail.

Only con is you can't use the bar
Jackson DK2M
ESP LTD M-200FM w/Tone Zone + PAF Pro
Ibanez RG7321
Digitech Whammy IV
Digitech GSP1101
Furman M-10 LxE
Peavey 6505
ISP Decimator
#3
- You'll still need to stretch the strings well before you lock down the nut, or you'll be running out of fine tuning pretty quickly as the strings "settle" on their own...

- Don't know what you mean by "tuning tricks"--do you mean like choosing a bridge angle and locking it down by balancing string tension against claw spring tension? If so, then no--the blocks take care of that for you

- Yes you can do other tunings, but you'll still need to unlock the nut in most cases. If your bridge isn't recessed, then you can us a D-Tuna

- The con is you won't be able to dive bomb, whammy bend, or whammy vibrato anymore
#4
by tricks i mean the stupid, tune hi e, then a then low e, then b etc etc
and how do you do a "good' block?
-Gibson SG Faded
-Ibanez RG5EX1L
-Custom Upside-Down Strat
-Modded Epiphone LP
-Fender Acoustic
*Marshall DSL15H
>Ibanez TS9
>MXR Micro Flanger
>Boss TU-3
>Danelectro Vibe
>Guyatone ST-2 Comrpessor
#5
Quote by Dr.Tong
by tricks i mean the stupid, tune hi e, then a then low e, then b etc etc
and how do you do a "good' block?


OK, yeah, I'd agree that tuning high E then low E, etc is stupid--just immobilize the trem at the correct angle, tune, and adjust the claw screws so that the bridge stays balanced at that angle with that tuning. Even blocked, you may have to go back and tune strings multiple times because the neck tension keeps the strings tuning somewhat affected by each other--blocking only takes the claw springs out of the equation.

I'm no expert on permanently blocking a trem, but based on a total of 20-30 articles/threads I've read and/or videos I've seen on the subject, here's what I'd recommend if you absolutely can't live with the Floyd Rose functionality:

- Temporarily immobilize the trem with the bridge plate at the anlge you want with picks or something small
- Measure the clearance on both sides of the metal trem block at 2 places each--top and bottom--for the length, take into acount the round corners of the trem cavity--you probably want to avoid having to match those contours in your wedges
- Cut 2 pieces of wood to the dimensions you found in the step above
- Replace the picks (or whatever) with the wedges. If they don't hold the proper bridge angle right off the bat, then do some more shaping until they do--if the problem is a matter of being too small then you might have to start over
- Once you're confident you have the perfect shapes/dimensions, using just a couple of drops of wood glue, glue your wedges where wood meets wood (i.e., don't glue to the metal trem)

You can use any wood, but the closer it is to the wood the guitar was made of the better--although I doubt it's possible to measure any difference regardless of what you use--do stay away from extremely soft/fragile woods like balsa and plywood, though.

BTW--great Joe Strummer quote. Maybe what you really need is a Telecaster.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Sep 10, 2011,
#6
I dont even use the fine tuners on mine, and i blocked it with a 9-volt battery, seems to have worked very well. i've had it in there for aout a month now
My sig? Nice.
#8
I would nog use a wooden block but metal. it gives you a huge amount of more sustain and tone!