#1
Hey guys

I write lots of stuff lately, some of the ideas are pretty good but I don't really know which tuning should I write in.

I like the sound of drop C and its low-end chunkiness but it's hard to actually play scales and solo stuff there.


I want to write good stuff not just low E string chugging songs, but standard tuning lacks that hardcore rhythm sound. Everything I play - sounds better in drop C than Dstd no matter what.

Should I switch to drop C? I've played in D standard for over 3 years now, every song I have written and transcribed to drop tuning sounds better in C.

But I don't want to end up not improving because I'll be stuck on chugging the low string all the time. I don't really know what to think about it.

/thanks
#2
There's nothing stopping you from soloing in drop C apart from yourself, what makes it hard to play the scales and so on?
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#4
Quote by Atax1a
How about C standard?

this. It's the best tuning.
#6
Quote by theknuckster
F Standard! Why does nobody else ever go up? Strings get tighter and don't flap all over the place.


Too tight. Plus its just not a great tuning as I've never actually seen anything written in F standard above E. Would be too much work.

On topic, drop C is a perfectly fine tuning, and the only part of your scale that is "messed up" so to say is just the low E (or actually C) string, which you could easily learn the whole tone change.
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#7
Quote by chadreed32
Too tight. Plus its just not a great tuning as I've never actually seen anything written in F standard above E. Would be too much work.

On topic, drop C is a perfectly fine tuning, and the only part of your scale that is "messed up" so to say is just the low E (or actually C) string, which you could easily learn the whole tone change.

I have. There are a few Airbourne songs in F Standard.

Anyway, if the dropped sixth string is bugging you, try C standard.
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#8
How is drop C any different for soloing than D standard? They have the exact same notes/strings for 5/6 strings. Do you solo on the low E string a lot? Of course not, that string is for chugging or riffing. All the strings that matter for solos are the exact same, and only slightly different than standard.
#9
Quote by MvAgusta
Hey guys

I write lots of stuff lately, some of the ideas are pretty good but I don't really know which tuning should I write in.

I like the sound of drop C and its low-end chunkiness but it's hard to actually play scales and solo stuff there.


I want to write good stuff not just low E string chugging songs, but standard tuning lacks that hardcore rhythm sound. Everything I play - sounds better in drop C than Dstd no matter what.

Should I switch to drop C? I've played in D standard for over 3 years now, every song I have written and transcribed to drop tuning sounds better in C.

But I don't want to end up not improving because I'll be stuck on chugging the low string all the time. I don't really know what to think about it.

/thanks

The only difference you'll see between drop C and D standard is that bottom string. everything else is the same. More often than not, you won't use that bottom string for solos.

Drop tunings allow you to do a lot more than just chug. That perfect fifth relation between the bottom two strings opens up some interesting chord options. If you find yourself writing a lot of chugging riffs that you're not satisfied with, write other riffs and look for ways to not use chugging as a crutch.
#11
Quote by Zerox8610
If stuff don't sound right it could be your intonation


+1
#12
I disagree that the low e string lacks the hardcore chugging sound. Ever heard of metallica or iron maiden? Its mostly in your amp,pickups and attack anyway

If you play covers that are in e standard then i would stick with that.
#13
Quote by chadreed32
I've never actually seen anything written in F standard above E

Eric Clapton has a few songs. It might just a live thing though.

On topic: maybe use both tunings?
I have songs written in several tunings. I have stuff for E, Eb, D, and B, and Bb standard tunings, as well as Drop D, C#, C, A, and G# tunings.
Basically I pick up one of my two guitars, and just play with whatever tuning it's in at the moment, see what I can come up with.

As for avoiding chug stuff, that's something I've been trying to avoid as well (kind of hard when one of the bands you write music for is a chug band..), and started playing around with different chordal stuff. I just learned the rhythm guitar parts for Breeze by Misha, and it gave me some new stuff to try out, and I've ended up writing some cool new things as a result.
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Last edited by kumamilesbear at Sep 10, 2011,
#14
The only thing that's different about drob tuning than regular tuning is the low string (obviously) I don't see why that would mess up your scales and soloing. It's just that the one string in a step lower and, (in my experience) metal guitar solos hardly even use the low string. Almost all of the sweeps I do only use the top 5 strings
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#15
Quote by Zerox8610
If stuff don't sound right it could be your intonation


I don't even know where to start. When did he ever say that his guitar was out of tune, or anything that could have lead to an intonation problem? I'll just stop there, though.

Oh, and secondly, you might want to try out this product. Its a pretty nifty little tool, it may come in handy some time in the future, or even - I don't know - now?


Quote by CV334
+1


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#16
I like the sound of drop C and its low-end chunkiness but it's hard to actually play scales and solo stuff there.


That's just not true. Everything's 4 semitones lower, that's all. Personally I never even use the top 4 semitones on my guitar, do you?

I want to write good stuff not just low E string chugging songs, but standard tuning lacks that hardcore rhythm sound. Everything I play - sounds better in drop C than Dstd no matter what.

Should I switch to drop C? I've played in D standard for over 3 years now, every song I have written and transcribed to drop tuning sounds better in C.

But I don't want to end up not improving because I'll be stuck on chugging the low string all the time. I don't really know what to think about it.


Believe it or not, unimaginative, dull riffing is a product of a unimaginative, dull musical mind, not the tuning of your instrument.

If you find yourself reverting to "stock" riffs and just

"Herp derp derp chug chug chug *squeal* chug"

then just give yourself a slap and come up with something better. If you like your sound in Drop C then congrats - you just made a decision that helps to shape your sound and style. Go with it!

Oh, and Placebo tune to F for most tunes, Megadeth have used it too iirc!
#17
soloing in any tuning is equally challenging; it's just about YOU learning scale patterns within it. if you put in the time to learn your patterns, you can solo in any random tuning.

play in the tuning that you like the feel and sound of best. i personally play in drop c, but thats cuz i like the low tone and loose feel of the strings. do whatever you are most comfortable with.