#1
There's a short-term study abroad program I may sign up for, 2-3 weeks in New Delhi, India in December/January.

Now there's an information session this week, but in the meantime if any UGists have been to this city I'd appreciate being warned if it's fun or shit.

Talk about your own study abroad if you want. I may do a semester-long program later.
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#2
New Delhi, India? Most be quite strange if you don't speak the language there. What language do they speak there? Uto-aztecan or Na-dene?
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#3
Quote by ErikLensherr
There's a short-term study abroad program I may sign up for, 2-3 weeks in New Delhi, India in December/January.

Now there's an information session this week, but in the meantime if any UGists have been to this city I'd appreciate being warned if it's fun or shit.

Talk about your own study abroad if you want. I may do a semester-long program later.


Cool. I live here. Going on 23 years now.


What study program is this? Which institution would you be studying at?
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The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.
#4
Quote by sage76
Cool. I live here. Going on 23 years now.


What study program is this? Which institution would you be studying at?

It doesn't say on my school's listing. I'll find out later. It's to study "India and the West," which I assume has to do with globalization, your country's role as one of the BRICs, etc.

How is it there?
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#5
Quote by ErikLensherr
It doesn't say on my school's listing. I'll find out later. It's to study "India and the West," which I assume has to do with globalization, your country's role as one of the BRICs, etc.

How is it there?


Kind of a broad question, isn't it....

Unless you've been to China or some other asian country it's going to be VERY strange.
Speaking from the experience of some acquaintances who came here, they said "No book can prepare you for India."

December and January are going to be cold. It won't snow, but it's going to be dry and very cold. Most places do not have indoor heating mechanisms.

If you're white and you go to the markets and all, every one is going to try and fleece you. Taxis, auto drivers, rickshaw pullers, they all are going to overcharge you by about 10 times. Best bet is to try and observe the locals and learn a bit of the language.

For anything else you would need to be specific....whether you are planning to visit any of the standard tourist destinations....Agra, Rajasthan, Kashmir or any Himalayan regions.....where you are studying etc
Quote by SlinkyBlue


The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.
#6
Cold, crowded, and everyone's trying to rip you off. Doesn't sound too drastically different from NYC.

What I might be a little worried over is the water. I've heard if you're a Westerner and you drink local water or eat foods prepared with local water in India you'll immediately get runny shits.
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#8
hriday_hazarika lives there, try asking him about it.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
I've been in New Delhi for a couple of years, and to be honest, I don't like the city very much.

As far as education goes, it depends on where you're studying. I'm currently studying English Literature at Delhi University. I don't like it, but I only have a year left, so I'm going to ride it out. There are some very good programs here [think business/commerce, law, and medicine], but overall, I'd say it's not very good. But then, there are monolithic places like IIT [for engineering and its related fields] and such. IITs and IIMs are basically what institutions like MIT and such are to the Americas. So, like any other place, there is a disparity in the quality of education. Basically, "pure" subjects like the ones I mentioned above have good programs at some places, but studying liberal arts here is not advisable.

Higher education is very rigid, compared to schools abroad. There isn't much flexibility. The concept of majors/minors doesn't seem to exist here, from what I've seen. You take a particular course, and you have to stick to the related subjects. So, if you've signed up for, let's say, English literature, you can't do a music composition module to add to your credits.

New Delhi is like any big city. You have posh places and shady places. Some people will try to take advantage of you; some people will try to be of utmost help.

Personally, I think you should skip this, and maybe head towards South-East Asia, if your program allows it. But, if you do come here, let me know, and we'll grab a drink. I won't be much help with showing you around though, since I'm fairly new to the city as well.

What I might be a little worried over is the water. I've heard if you're a Westerner and you drink local water or eat foods prepared with local water in India you'll immediately get runny shits.

Well, you can buy bottled water nearly everywhere, so that won't be a problem.

It's probably best to avoid food from street vendors, though.

Nearly anything spicy will probably give you diarrhea, though.
Last edited by hriday_hazarika at Sep 10, 2011,
#11
Yeah, stick to bottled water. About the food, you can't do much. Even the milder stuff can cause stomach problems.

And if you stay in the dorms (we call them hostels here) of whichever institution/college you are attending, the food there is going to taste terrible. Even the locals hate it and I rarely ate Mess food.

The upside it that you can have a lot of fun in and around Delhi-Gurgaon, Noida etc.


Quote by hriday_hazarika
I've been in New Delhi for a couple of years, and to be honest, I don't like the city very much.

As far as education goes, it depends on where you're studying. I'm currently studying English Literature at Delhi University. I don't like it, but I only have a year left, so I'm going to ride it out. There are some very good programs here [think business/commerce, law, and medicine], but overall, I'd say it's not very good. But then, there are monolithic places like IIT [for engineering and its related fields] and such. IITs and IIMs are basically what institutions like MIT and such are to the Americas. So, like any other place, there is a disparity in the quality of education. Basically, "pure" subjects like the ones I mentioned above have good programs at some places, but studying liberal arts here is not advisable.

Higher education is very rigid, compared to schools abroad. There isn't much flexibility. The concept of majors/minors doesn't seem to exist here, from what I've seen. You take a particular course, and you have to stick to the related subjects. So, if you've signed up for, let's say, English literature, you can't do a music composition module to add to your credits.

New Delhi is like any big city. You have posh places and shady places. Some people will try to take advantage of you; some people will try to be of utmost help.

Personally, I think you should skip this, and maybe head towards South-East Asia, if your program allows it. But, if you do come here, let me know, and we'll grab a drink. I won't be much help with showing you around though, since I'm fairly new to the city as well.


Well, you can buy bottled water nearly everywhere, so that won't be a problem.

It's probably best to avoid food from street vendors, though.

Nearly anything spicy will probably give you diarrhea, though.



Which college are you studying at?? I live VERY close to Delhi University.

As far as the rigidity goes, you are right. Even the so called "elective subjects", few as they were, were actually allotted to us by the department. We had no choice in "electives".
Quote by SlinkyBlue


The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.
#12
Quote by sage76
Which college are you studying at?? I live VERY close to Delhi University.

As far as the rigidity goes, you are right. Even the so called "elective subjects", few as they were, were actually allotted to us by the department. We had no choice in "electives".


I'm at Venkateswara.

I had to choose between Medieval History and Economics. I chose the latter; the teacher didn't turn up for the entire year, and the replacement teacher taught us for a month or so towards the end of the year. Needless to say, I failed Economics.
#13
Quote by hriday_hazarika
I'm at Venkateswara.

I had to choose between Medieval History and Economics. I chose the latter; the teacher didn't turn up for the entire year, and the replacement teacher taught us for a month or so towards the end of the year. Needless to say, I failed Economics.


South Campus then. Not so close to my house after all..............

Sorry to hear about the failure.

I'll give you some unsolicited advice, though you probably have heard it from someone else by now...still...

It would probably apply to Erik too.

Just buy some standard book everyone else is buying and find out the "important stuff". Usually, topics and questions get repeated and this is how I got through college. Seems like you want to actually learn stuff and that won't happen in class.

My experience in college (sadly) was : do whatever everyone else is doing and do the bare minimum. It was in my free time that I actually did something worthwhile, approached an awesome professor from another college and ended up publishing 5 research papers over the course of 2 years.
Quote by SlinkyBlue


The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.