#1
I've been doing a bit of recording stuff recently, not very good at it, and I've asked for advice here a few times in the past and people have been telling me about making space for all the instruments, and you do it be EQing I think.

But the thing I need to do is make certain chords clear, like, in my mix it's really muddy and just fuzzy so there's no clarity, you can barely make out the chords, and I think you fix this by EQing or something like that right? Like you cut/boost certain frequencies so you can hear the chords, but how am I supposed to know what frequencies to boost/cut? Can someone explain with a bit of detail what I should be doing?
#2
It'll help a lot more if you can post the file so that we can hear exactly what's going on. Is it just that one track that's muddy or is it when you have the entire song playing?
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#3
You can also try emphasizing the notes on the higher strings just by playing those strings. The "mud" is coming from the bottom strings on your guitar. If you want to use EQ instead of playing just the higher strings, then concentrate on attentuating the lower frequencies. In a recording, the bass, piano and guitar can all compete for the same space. Usually the piano and bass win. Try listening to some professional recordings and hear how they treat the guitar and other instruments. Also, there are several good books on the topic of recording that are worth reading. Good luck!
#4
Quote by evening_crow
It'll help a lot more if you can post the file so that we can hear exactly what's going on. Is it just that one track that's muddy or is it when you have the entire song playing?


Have a listen to this http://soundcloud.com/sebyumgoong/post-hardcore-rough-demo-2

And if you want, compare that to what should be heard in my GP tab here https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1426197

To be honest, now that I'm listening to it again, I think the guitar tone is just generally really poor which might be the bigger problem.

KG6_Steven: Yeah I tend to do that actually, emphasising the higher strings that is and is does help a fair bit, but it's still not enough.
#5
maybe cutting around 1kHz or 500Hz and boosting by 7-8 dB around 6kHz. I don't know how it sound but those can help....Also try compressing your guitar! Also one important thing, use a low cut (high pass filter) on ALL tracks. It help cleaning yours tracks.
#6
Also, unless you're using professional studio monitors, it could be your speakers and room environment effecting the sound. Don't forget about those elements, since they play an important part in how you hear the sound. You can also try listening through headphones, or make a CD and try it on different sources. It's not exactly my style, but it didn't sound all that muddy to me.
#7
I checked your file !

Your mix is pretty good mate!

However I understand what you mean, and what you want.

It's the keyboard. High pass from 400 Hz
The symphonizer
#8
remember this... in a recording situation, the way you EQ your guitars is completely different than how you do when you are playing live or how you practice. what you want to do in recording (generally) to get a guitar to stand out is to get the mids as high as possible without it sounding like a cheap radio. that gives your guitar some presence. if you cut the mids, it competes with the bass for lows and looses, and competes for cymbals for highs, and looses a lot of the time.
#9
Quote by User_Name336
remember this... in a recording situation, the way you EQ your guitars is completely different than how you do when you are playing live or how you practice. what you want to do in recording (generally) to get a guitar to stand out is to get the mids as high as possible without it sounding like a cheap radio. that gives your guitar some presence. if you cut the mids, it competes with the bass for lows and looses, and competes for cymbals for highs, and looses a lot of the time.



How do you explain bands like Carcass?

Their tone is one hell of a mid scoop
The symphonizer
#10
1) Sometimes it is better to use two mono tracks at opposing stereo locations - 80L / 80R or 100L / 100R. Also, I generally try to keep reverb width as thin as possible when multiple instruments are playing at once - maybe a width of 10 to get a little more volume without increasing gain.

Think of your 100L-100R range as "bins" that shouldn't really be occupied with the same frequencies between instruments if it can be avoided. That's where sounds get drowned out.

2) Try increasing presence by giving a slight EQ boost to the higher frequencies. This will greatly depend on everything being played, but I generally put a slight increase starting around 5000, peaking at 8000, and then reaching +0 at 10,000, with a low-pass cutting out after that.

You can also try the exact opposite, but just remember that increasing presence only works if the other instruments aren't already boosted there. It's all about picking and choosing which frequencies to boost within their own unique section of the stereo "map."

3) Add a high pass to cut out lower frequencies. Start a slow slope downward at 400-500 and cut out to -20 at 50 or so. Otherwise, the lower frequencies may cause clipping without you even noticing it.

4) Use a filter to help accentuate the EQ settings. In Cubase I like using "Tonic."

5) I also agree with the comments about making sure you are listening to the mix with high quality speakers/monitors. They don't have to be a fortune, but they make a difference. I have a set of Audio-Technica HT50s sitting on my head right now and I feel spoiled whenever I listen to anything through them. You get a really perception of all of the frequencies and locations of the sounds in your mix.

Good luck!
#11
If it sounds fizzy, then you should try notching out some of the frequencies that are making it "fizzy".

If it sounds muddy, try taking out some of the frequencies that are making it "muddy".
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#12
Quote by Sympho
How do you explain bands like Carcass?

Their tone is one hell of a mid scoop

notice the word "generally" in there? i didn't say that was useful or even acceptable in all situations. i felt it would be in this one because they wanted a cleaner mix, and to me the guitars are to blame. they sound like they have their full frequency range and it sounded like the op wanted them to have more presence in the song. the way i see that happening is to eq everything into their own frequency range and bumping the mids higher than they would normally, though not doing that on the guitars through external eq.
#13
Thanks for all the replies, I recorded another demo yesterday and took some advice in, such as putting the mids up the normal, and I'm sure it's helped. I played around a bit with high/low cuts but I was being a bit lazy and didn't really try everything that was said here. But I'll come back to this thread once I properly try EQing soon.