#1
started getting into a bit of a rut practice wise so i have started learning where the notes are on the fretboard, my practice routine is normally scale warm ups then chord changes, strumming, picking technique and so on, i have been playing on and off for about 2 years with some advancement but not enough, i feel i should practice more, although i do practice every day, sometimes i just get board, so what will i gain from learning the notes on the fretboard and is there anything else i should do, i know a good few songs to play along with but soloing is a problem, i listen to classic rock and prog but have been getting into heavy metal recently, megadeath, matallica and maiden, should i practice theory or should i maybe have a few lessons with a teacher to guide me, thanks.
#2
learn everything up to the fifth fret, then the twelfth. after the fifth fret its pretty easy, and by focusing on only the first 5 at first its a lot less to try and grasp on.

oh and learn the intervals (half steps, whole steps).

a good site is musictheory.net to help out, but its still reliant on you learning it yourself as its really only full of basic music theory lessons and practice tools for stuff like this
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#3
even if you are self taught you should visit a guitar teacher once every 3 months or so and just let them watch your technique and criticize, etc.
#4
People learn differently, and I don't know the fretboard by heart, but I think it's not worth it to undertake a process which only has the sole purpose of learning the fretboard. I think you'll get there, eventually, if you study scales. How is this? Well, when I learn scales, I find it very useful learning where each root note on the fretboard is. So, if it's the C Major scale, I start by learning every C note on the fretboard - from there it's pretty easy to figure what notes around it belong to the scale and which ones don't. Knowing a few notes like this, by heart, will cover quite a lot of the fretboard, and from there, it's a lot easier to start filling in the gaps. Also, by this method, you'll learn loads of scales, and therefore have a better chance of understanding chords, chord progressions, and general musical theory.

Either way, good luck. I can just imagine how knowing the fretboard well will help one kick some serious ass when improvising.
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#6
I did it by note cards.

I wrote down a fret number on the front and then put the corresponding note (in actual notation) on the back. It was about 3 days of about and hour a day going through them and I had them all down.
#7
Quote by scguitarking927
I did it by note cards.

I wrote down a fret number on the front and then put the corresponding note (in actual notation) on the back. It was about 3 days of about and hour a day going through them and I had them all down.


How well did that work when it came to just looking at the fretboard with no cards?
#9
thanks for the replies guys, i like the fretboard exercise and it's fun too, "is that a bit odd" but it does work as does playing to a beat on the metronome and sounding out the notes, once again thanks for the tips.
#10
theres a game online called fretboard warrior, a ball goes on the neck and you need to identify the note....

also has version for iphone and probably android.


but the natural notes are pretty easy for me to remember... I can't do it with speed yet, but I can think of the sequence easily up to the octave....

basically every note skips a fret except BC and EF, they are always together....than in the spaces, are the sharps and flats.

so for the 6th and 1st strings

ef-g-a-bc-d-e