#1
I'm hoping someone is familiar with this course. I have an exam tomorrow morning and i've just been revising and i've come across something that's puzzling me.

In regards to harmonic analysis: say there's a minor chord followed by a dominant chord that is a perfect fifth away. You are supposed to put a square bracket underneath linking the two chords, right?

Now I remember being taught that you are not to put a roman numeral above the minor chord unless it is diatonic to the key you are in. But what if it qualifies for a modal interchange chord?


Thanks.
#2
Quote by ridder
Now I remember being taught that you are not to put a roman numeral above the minor chord unless it is diatonic to the key you are in.


I've never heard about this 'convention'.

If i play a C - Fm progression i would notate it as I - iv in C major, althought iv is not strictly diatonical in C, it functions as a subdominant creating a nice plagal cadance.
#3
i didn't take the course, but my school uses a similar system (well, more or less jacked from berklees system with a bit of more convential classical stuff too).
brackets are for ii-Vs (minor chord to a dominant a fourth up) with an arrow going from the V chord to its resolution--which should be a fourth up (eg, with dm 7-g7-CMAJ7 youd bracket the dm7 and g7 and draw an arrow from the G7 to the CMAJ).
I was taught to roman numeral every chord (but its possible very berklee does things differently)--not using figured bass but the numeral, with chord quality and accidentals if neccesary. (otherwise roman numerals come from the major scale of the tonic chord--even if its in a minor key--for example an AMAJ7 in C minor would be labled bVIMAJ7).
id take all this with a grain of salt, because I'm not familiar with the specific course your taking (meaning check against your textbook/someone in your class)--I'm hoping this can be as helpful as it can be.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)