#1
Hey, UG community. My brother and I are interested in taking up classical guitar and learning music theory along with it. We both have solid understanding of some basic music theory (major/minor scale construction, triad formation, 7th chords, key signatures) and we've been trying to learn more, but we haven't found a lot of help on the internet. So, what books would you musicians recommend to a couple of newbies? Any helpful guidance is greatly appreciated.

Oh, and before someone brings it up, our schedules are air-tight with school and other extracurricular activities; so a personal instructor, who we realize would be best to learn from overall, is out of our way.

EDIT: Did some looking on amazon.com, and found a few books: "Classical Guitar for Dummies", "Classical Guitar 2000" by Charles Duncan, and "The Art of Classical Guitar" by Charles Duncan. Anyone come across these books before?
Last edited by BigJellybean at Sep 11, 2011,
#2
My preferred book for people to self-teach is Solo Guitar Playing by Frederick Noad.

I feel that it leaves out less important things than most other books available, even if it is itself not complete. It is also extremely easy to follow. It does not cover music theory.
#3
I'm studying classical guitar in college. The books that we use are:

Technique-
Giuliani's 120 studies for right hand development
Diatonic major and minor scales- Segovia
Slur, ornament and reach develpment exercises- Aaron Shearer

Studies-
Carcassi's twenty-five melodious and progressive studies (op.60)
Fernando Sor's twenty studies for the guitar (segovia edition)

I bought the Charles Duncan books, they're ok but I think that you're better off with the other books I listed

Oh, and if you have any more questions regarding classical guitar, just ask
#6
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
I'm studying classical guitar in college. The books that we use are:

Technique-
Giuliani's 120 studies for right hand development
Diatonic major and minor scales- Segovia
Slur, ornament and reach develpment exercises- Aaron Shearer

Studies-
Carcassi's twenty-five melodious and progressive studies (op.60)
Fernando Sor's twenty studies for the guitar (segovia edition)

I bought the Charles Duncan books, they're ok but I think that you're better off with the other books I listed

Oh, and if you have any more questions regarding classical guitar, just ask



I wholeheartedly agree with this selection of books, but only if a teacher is present to direct the student through them until they become self-sufficient.
#7
I'd get a teacher at least to show you proper technique, a book can't do that, and technique is a huge part of classical guitar.
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#8
Quote by iancmtaylor
I'd get a teacher at least to show you proper technique, a book can't do that, and technique is a huge part of classical guitar.


Perhaps over the Summer when we don't have school to worry about. Too bad school just started.
#9
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
I'm studying classical guitar in college. The books that we use are:

Technique-
Giuliani's 120 studies for right hand development
Diatonic major and minor scales- Segovia
Slur, ornament and reach develpment exercises- Aaron Shearer

Studies-
Carcassi's twenty-five melodious and progressive studies (op.60)
Fernando Sor's twenty studies for the guitar (segovia edition)

I bought the Charles Duncan books, they're ok but I think that you're better off with the other books I listed

Oh, and if you have any more questions regarding classical guitar, just ask


Thanks for the list! I will definitely look into these books.
#10
All of those books are sheet music without instruction, just so that you are aware.
#12
That's much of the battle, now I hope that you are also comfortable with creating your own technique. Depending on what editions you buy fingerings could be absent. I recommend editions with fingerings to at least give you an idea of how others would play the music.
#13
Quote by Vlasco
That's much of the battle, now I hope that you are also comfortable with creating your own technique. Depending on what editions you buy fingerings could be absent. I recommend editions with fingerings to at least give you an idea of how others would play the music.


Take this advice;

If you don't fret correctly, some notes won't ring out long enough as intended, which is just not nice.

You probably won't notice it, because you're too occupied with playing itself, unless you really listen for it throughout your practice.

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#14
Yes, and many non-classical players converted to classical have a hard time using their fourth finger on the G (as a common example I'm using a G chord) so that the third can cover the D while the first and second run melodies.