#1
Hello,

I want to build a FuzzFace clone.
Let's say I have everything needed, and have a pcb like this:


I put everything on it, but how can I wire them as the schematic says?
Will I need extra cables, or what?
#2
you should make solder paths to connect the components, honestly, i'd rather make an actually pcb, its just easier, but that works too, you just have to be extra careful with the connections you make
#3
Quote by tntero
you should make solder paths to connect the components, honestly, i'd rather make an actually pcb, its just easier, but that works too, you just have to be extra careful with the connections you make


can't i just use some kind of cables to connect them?

how can i make an actual pcb? it seems to be pretty difficult.
#4
the fuzz face has very few components so id say you're much better off using the perf/ what ever that board is. All you have to do is use some wire to connect the parts, or use the leads of the components do do the same
#5
what you see is a vero board. you can use it and you can cut/snap it into a good size if yours is big.

for a fuzz face, PCBs are waste of your time. they're easier if you can't follow where the circuit is going on the board. therefore, for beginners PCBs are nice. but making your own is a hassle.

this is the fuzz vero i use:



it works, it sounds good. it's a positive ground PNP design, so you might be a bit confused at first. you take wires (22~24 gauge would be nice) and run them to the lugs on potentiometers, output jacks, bypass switches, and what not. the red squares on it are cut traces, which are interruptions on the board's strips. the transistor's aren't labeled which way is top, but the collector is on top, then base, emitter on bottom.

BTW, it is NOT a complete schematic. this by itself will not do anything. you have to wire two pots (fuzz and volume) and i didn't care to put those on because i am aware of how they're wired.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


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#6
ECistheBest cool thanks.

That's the schematic I've looked firstly:


If I make it I will post pictures - sound clips.
#7
keep in mind, that circuit is a PNP, negative ground version. not vintage correct, although it does work, and it'll be able to run daisy chained with other negative ground pedals.

keep in mind the transistor, collector base and emitters. the polarity of electrolytic capacitors. and the 0.1uF cap in that schematic, should be either .01uF or .022uF. i favor .022u, but its up to you. and good luck finding suitable transistors.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


UG's Best DIY PedalBoard
#9
out of many transistors, what you're looking for is a "Bipolar Junction Transistor" which basically amplifies signals. out of those, there are two types, an NPN and a PNP. NPN transistor is common with pedals because they conduct basically "forwards" and PNP conduct "backwards"... that isn't the exact phenomena, but it'll serve for this explanation.

according to your layout, you want a PNP. it is wired to work with a PNP transistor while maintaining the negative voltage ground scheme. i think any PNP transistor will work, but there are some transistors that work better than others for this circuit. my layout calls for a PNP transistor too, and it is a positive voltage ground pedal. which is different form many pedals out there on the market. that is one reason the designer of your layout chose to somewhat "flip" the circuit so it works with negative voltage ground. and yes, both layouts work if wired correctly.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


UG's Best DIY PedalBoard