#1
So i am stuck trying to understand how to go about learning to sing what I hear, as I have bought the Jazz guitar structures book and it is a suggested way to practice which seems like it would help greatly. I like how the book uses sight reading and has a cd to play the stuff in it as well which greatly helps with knowledge and ear training. So if anyone can send me a link or explain how i can sing what i play that would be greatly appreciated.

Also it says sing what you play because the lines you can sing are the lines that are really a part of you and it goes on to say that it will greatly reduce the time spent trying to incorporate ideas into my musical vocabulary
"
Every band that is favored in the genre sells-out and commercializes... That's just the way it is :/"


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#2
E G B A- I sing: E G B A.
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#3
I'm a little confused by the question.

What is it that you can't do? If I play you a riff, you can't sing it? Why not?
#4
Well as far as I know, when you play a chord, for instance a c major chord you have a c major scale whit seven notes in it, therefore you can only sing those notes, by using a melody made of it that is well fitted into the melody or chord progression you're having on the guitar/piano/whatever...
#5
You need to spend a little more time on your posts. I honestly still don't understand what your problem is.

Because honestly - just because you have a C major chord doesn't mean you're in a C major scale. Just because you're in a C major scale doesn't mean you can only sing those seven notes. And I don't understand at all how that issue is related to singing what you hear.
#6
You guys are incompentant especially Hotspur JR Blacklodge is not me that is another guy, why are you saying rewrite what i say when thats not me! Also there is solfage where you sing the vocal range of the notes. Can you sing a riif? I cant sing it cause what am i supposed to sing?
"
Every band that is favored in the genre sells-out and commercializes... That's just the way it is :/"


ESP SV standard
Ibanez RG7321
#7
Ok, I'll keep this simple. Intro to Master of Puppets is E D C# C.

I sing: E D D# C.

Crazy Train main riff is F# F# C# F# D F# C# B A G# A B A G# E. Guess what notes I sing?

Notes are notes, you can play them on a guitar, on a piano, on a washtub bass, or you can sing them.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#8
Quote by monobrow7
You guys are incompentant especially Hotspur JR Blacklodge is not me that is another guy, why are you saying rewrite what i say when thats not me! Also there is solfage where you sing the vocal range of the notes. Can you sing a riif? I cant sing it cause what am i supposed to sing?


You're calling me incompetent and you're the one who doesn't know how to sing what you hear.

Open your mouth. Breath out. Vibrate your vocal chords.
#10
thank you ulfe you acctually provided a real example that was helpful now i understand.
"
Every band that is favored in the genre sells-out and commercializes... That's just the way it is :/"


ESP SV standard
Ibanez RG7321
#11
So you basically try and keep your vocal chords ringing out at the same pitch till it sounds unison with the note is that correct?
"
Every band that is favored in the genre sells-out and commercializes... That's just the way it is :/"


ESP SV standard
Ibanez RG7321
#12
Quote by monobrow7
So you basically try and keep your vocal chords ringing out at the same pitch till it sounds unison with the note is that correct?


Yes. Easier said than done.

EDIT: Why choose the name monobrow? Are you famous for your single eyebrow?
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
Last edited by soviet_ska at Sep 15, 2011,
#13
Yes, you have to match the pitch that you hear with your voice. This is something that you can improve upon by doing ear training/aural skills exercises.
Start off easy with simple pitch matching. Play a note and then sing it. Adjust yourself if you are off. Repeat until you are fairly good at it. I'd suggest starting off using notes that are diatonic to one scale, and once you get that down, then do it with random notes. After that, I'm sure there are good guides out there. Try singing major/minor scales up and down (play at the same time sometimes too in order to check yourself), try singing major and minor triads, try singing melodies etc. Just work your way up. All it takes is a bit of practice and you'll be able to sing whatever you hear. Solfege can be a great help for this and I'd suggest looking into it, especially if you ever plan on sight singing. An important skill to develop is your skill at audiating (is that it?). It is your ability to hear notes and intervals in your head without singing or playing anything. I think that this is a very versatile skill and will come in handy in many different situations whether you realize it or not.
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#14
For me, the whole concept of singing what you play is a way to play what you hear. Even if I am not singing while playing there should always be a melody in my head sounding just like the guitar does. That's the goal at least, maybe I'll get there, maybe not.