#1
When recording guitars, ive noticed that I sometimes get a "warbly" sound, mainly when strumming power chords. The best way I could describe it is almost like a tremolo effect, or a very quick volume swell at the beginning of each chord, and I have no idea whats causing it. My recording setup is running a cable from the line out on my Vypyr 30 to the input on my Line 6 GX, I use no amp sims in POD Farm, just the EQ. No noise gate, compression, or anything. It sounds fine when I'm just playing, I only get the warbly effect when I play back my recording. Here's the best example I have of what's going on, but this was recorded using the amp sims on the GX, not the Vypyr. Skip ahead to about 2:10 in the recording titled "Nerves Are Shot": http://artists.ultimate-guitar.com/diamondsarentforever/

Anybody know what could be causing this? Any help is greatly appreciated
My Gear:
PRS SE Custom 24 7 string
Schecter C-1 Custom
Jackson SLSMG
Line 6 POD HD500X

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#2
Without seeing the set up I have no ideal but honestly it sounds sweet for that particular part in the song, good stuff man
#3
It's compression from the kick drum. Notice how everything levels out after the double bass drum parts stop.
What I'm guessing is happening is you have a compressor on the final mixdown to bump up the overall mix but it's messing with the levels on the whole mix when it's counteracting those kick drum spikes.

I suggest doing a few compressors on drums, and then don't do a heavy compression at all on the final mix.
#4
Yea, sure does sound like the kick pumping the mix throughout, especially on the double kick parts. Almost sounds like guitars are side-chained to the kick during the 2:10 part.

If you're going to use heavy compression/limiting on your 2 buss, you need to clip the snare and kick if you want to keep them loud but not have them pump the master comp/limiter.
#5
Would I be wrong to say that is the Haas effect? (please correct me if I am wrong)
#6
Only briefly skimmed the Haas effect wikipedia page, but no, I don't think this is the Haas effect.

What's happening in the recording (or what it sounds like, at least) is there's a compressor on the master track that is being triggered by the kick, so once the kick hits, the entire mix is being compressed down to a lower volume then releasing back to normal volume only to be compressed again on the next hit, thus creating the tremolo effect.
#7
Thanks for the replies guys! The compression thing does make sense, and in that song I do have compression on the final mix. However, I just recorded a cover of Watch the World Burn today and it does the same thing in certain parts, and I haven't even mixed it yet. So you think if I put some compression on the drum track (which is a straight rip from Tuxguitar btw, so I cant just do it on the bass drum), that it should clear everything up?

EDIT: Okay, so I found a kick drum compressor in Live and threw that on the drum track, and it does seem to help a little bit. However, if I set it to where all the warbly effect is gone, the drums are too quiet, but if I make the drums as loud as they need to be, then the unwanted effect comes back Are there and tips someone would like to share to make the guitars sort of "override" the drum track (or something like that)? Also, one more quick question. Im thinking of getting some drum programming software, would I have this same problem with it?
My Gear:
PRS SE Custom 24 7 string
Schecter C-1 Custom
Jackson SLSMG
Line 6 POD HD500X

My SoundCloud
Last edited by --{matt}-- at Sep 12, 2011,
#9
Well I think it's just simply 'cause of incorrect settings of some of your processor (this 'Vypyr 30' or Line 6 GX), or because of you connected them directly to each other (in sequence).
'Cause as far as I understand by 'warmbly' you meant that slow-attack sound. Or some error in hardware compression i think.

Try to record guitar and drums apart of themselves. I think this might solve the problem.
It's an a hardware compression error. Your POD just can't deal with the drums and guitar playin' simultaneously. Hope this helps.
Last edited by PavelD at Sep 13, 2011,
#10
Put http://www.gvst.co.uk/gclip.htm on your drum track, lower the clip and raise the gain. This will take down the peaks while raising the volume, so your track will sound louder, while actually taking up less headroom.

Another tip for you is to mix at low volumes. Instead of having all your tracks as close to clipping as possible, just select all your tracks at once, lower the volume faders so your master track is peaking around -6, and then mix there, making sure the master never goes above -6. If you can get everything balanced at this point, just put a limiter on your master track with a threshold of -6db and an output of -0.3db and you'll have decent volume and a balanced mix.
Last edited by Odirunn at Sep 13, 2011,
#11
Quote by Odirunn
Put http://www.gvst.co.uk/gclip.htm on your drum track, lower the clip and raise the gain. This will take down the peaks while raising the volume, so your track will sound louder, while actually taking up less headroom.

Another tip for you is to mix at low volumes. Instead of having all your tracks as close to clipping as possible, just select all your tracks at once, lower the volume faders so your master track is peaking around -6, and then mix there, making sure the master never goes above -6. If you can get everything balanced at this point, just put a limiter on your master track with a threshold of -6db and an output of -0.3db and you'll have decent volume and a balanced mix.

Thanks man, that's great advice! I tried it and its pretty much exactly what I'm looking for. I'll have to play around with it some to get a good sound, but that helps out a lot!
My Gear:
PRS SE Custom 24 7 string
Schecter C-1 Custom
Jackson SLSMG
Line 6 POD HD500X

My SoundCloud
#12
Don't compress the master mix, compress the guitar and bass only. Leave the master alone. Otherwise you'll get this problem, and unless you're a sound engineer, and know how to work around this, then don't attempt, cause I've been trying for years and can't find a decent way around compressing the master.
#13
The key to compression on the 2 buss is to have only have the slightest bit of compression; It's more to help the mix glue together than to compress peaks for the sake of getting move volume during mastering.
#15
Quote by lextexrex
If you are using Live 8, there is a limiter that you can just put on the master track. It actually works surprisingly well.

I'm actually using Live Lite, the version that comes with the Line 6 POD GX Do you know if its on this version as well?
My Gear:
PRS SE Custom 24 7 string
Schecter C-1 Custom
Jackson SLSMG
Line 6 POD HD500X

My SoundCloud