#1
While practicing Saturday for a show later that night, I was running low on sticks. To fix this, I started taping together both the broken ones, and the ones that looked like they were close to breaking (it reinforces them, to make them last longer). After doing this, I discovered that if the duct tape is wrapped thick, you can actually use the taped part to get a sound similar to that of a mallet, which makes it perfect for fade-ins and such on the cymbals.

So, does anyone else have any tricks of their own to contribute?
#2
I don't ever take the strap off my guitars, so when I put the strap on I put a piece of tape around the end that covers/closes the rest of the hole. My straps never accidentally come off while playing and it's way cheaper than locks.

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#3
Quote by jthm_guitarist
I don't ever take the strap off my guitars, so when I put the strap on I put a piece of tape around the end that covers/closes the rest of the hole. My straps never accidentally come off while playing and it's way cheaper than locks.


Thats a pretty cool idea, but I have a very very nice leather strap, and I don't want to put tape on it. =/
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#4
Quote by jthm_guitarist
I don't ever take the strap off my guitars, so when I put the strap on I put a piece of tape around the end that covers/closes the rest of the hole. My straps never accidentally come off while playing and it's way cheaper than locks.


All locks are only as strong as thier mounting points. While that may stop the strap falling off, I wouldn't trust it entirely. I know people who've had that problem though, and would appreciate that tip.

I often just use a 2p coin with a hole drilled in it as a lock to stop the strap coming off, on top a strap pin that's screwed to the guitar with a huge screw. I've yet to have one fail on me yet.

EDIT -
As this is the drum forum, I'll talk drumming for a bit.
I've always tapped up the ends of new stricks, with electrical/insulation tape. Not the actual tip, but the 5 or 6 inches beneath it. I've found that makes my sticks last a lot longer. When the tape gets a bit worn and starts to tear from rimshots, etc, just re-tape it. I imagine poor technique is what kills my sticks so fast, but I have found this prolongs the life of them for me, atleast.

If you can't afford a high hat clutch, but want a closed high hat while using double kick, I have another tip (It dosen't work perfectly). For a show I did ages ago, I kept a capo clamped on my high hat stand, and if you can drum reasonabley with one hand for a few seconds, you can move it from the stand, and clamp it to the hats. Then do the same when you remove it. It worked aright with my old capo (I keep it just incase I need it for that again .), different capo designs might not work so well.
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Last edited by Carl6661 at Sep 13, 2011,
#5
Quote by Carl6661
As this is the drum forum, I'll talk drumming for a bit.
I've always tapped up the ends of new stricks, with electrical/insulation tape. Not the actual tip, but the 5 or 6 inches beneath it. I've found that makes my sticks last a lot longer. When the tape gets a bit worn and starts to tear from rimshots, etc, just re-tape it. I imagine poor technique is what kills my sticks so fast, but I have found this prolongs the life of them for me, atleast.

If you can't afford a high hat clutch, but want a closed high hat while using double kick, I have another tip (It dosen't work perfectly). For a show I did ages ago, I kept a capo clamped on my high hat stand, and if you can drum reasonabley with one hand for a few seconds, you can move it from the stand, and clamp it to the hats. Then do the same when you remove it. It worked aright with my old capo (I keep it just incase I need it for that again .), different capo designs might not work so well.
Damn; that second tip's pretty creative. What kind of sound did it get? Like, completely closed, or kinda washy?
#6
If you want cheap splash cymbals, look for cracked cymbals on ebay. I've gotten cracked zildjian a custom crashes and cut them down into splashes. they sound pretty damn good for what they are
#8
If you're good with tin snips, use those. First cut trace a circle with the diameter you want, then cut it as perfectly as you can. Then just use a file to smooth out the edge.

If you don't want to do that, take it to a shop. They'll cut it down perfectly on a lathe for less than the cost of buying high quality splashes.
Last edited by Donkey_Punch at Sep 16, 2011,
#9
I wonder if I can convince a friend to do it as his project for his metals class....