#1
hey, been playing for about 3 months and realized the way i hold a few open chords is way different than the way i hold barre chords. For chords like Am or E I hold the neck resting on my palm and my thumb is mostly hanging over the top with the first knuckle from the tip of the thumb making contact with the neck. For barre chords the only thing making contact with the neck is the tip and bottom of my thumb. Until now it hasn't caused problems but I'm noticing progress on my switches from F to open chords is really slow. I'd much prefer to switch to the right habit now rather than later. Thanks a lot for any help.
#2
I think I know what you mean, and I do the same. No worries, I gather it's pretty common. If you have gigantic hands, you can do barre chords with your thumb over the neck (Hendrix did), but I've never met anyone who does.

Thumb behind the neck for barres, thumb over the neck for open chords. Hey, it works.
Quote by Kensai


Awesome guy right here
#3
Quote by Joeval
you can do barre chords with your thumb over the neck

I do that, i find it way more comfortable to play like that.

I generally have my hand wrapped around the neck all the time (i think it's called baseball bat grip or something like that)
#4
The way you're playing is perfectly normal.

If you want to do switch faster you just have to practice it.

Also, if you want to go from open E or A into a chord more quickly you can use the finger positions you use on barre - for instance instead of holding the open chord with your index middle and 4th finger you can hold it with your middle 4th and pinky finger.
#6
Dont worry about where you are after 3 months, just like everyone else you are really nowhere. You think you can play barre chords, but almost everyone knows where you are.
I tell this to new players and get slammed, but playing guitar is a lifelong thing.
There are no progress tests.
Play to have fun, learning any instrument is not a job.
Get a good instructor to teach you music theory, this will go a long way.
I can promise you in a year you will look back and feel like a dope for posting this.
#7
I'll feel like a dope for making sure my technique is correct? O.o You seem to have misunderstood my post. And what do you mean I may think I can play barre chords? I'm not saying i can play them all but of course i can play a few including F...
#8
All barre chords are the same, you can play one you can play all.

i'm not quite sure what you mean about difficulty thou. Say you thumb-fret frist fret low E for an F chord, there's no reason why you can't thumb Fret 3rd fret low e as well for a g chord say
Quote by ErikLensherr
It's threads like this that separate grammar Nazis from only mildly anti-Semitic grammar conservatives.
#9
Quote by teh_goon
All barre chords are the same, you can play one you can play all.


Nonsense.

This is a barre chord.

-13-
-13-
-19-
-17-
-15-
-13-
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#10
I meant all regular barre chords, someone whose just learning probably won't be using that sort of chord. That chord actually isn't that hard either
Quote by ErikLensherr
It's threads like this that separate grammar Nazis from only mildly anti-Semitic grammar conservatives.
#11
Quote by teh_goon
I meant all regular barre chords, someone whose just learning probably won't be using that sort of chord. That chord actually isn't that hard either


It's significantly more difficult than the standard E, Em, A and Am shape barre chords.

Also, in my experience, most people struggle to get the high E string to ring clearly when playing the chord I posted, particularly when transitioning to that chord quickly. If you can manage it easily, good for you.

My point was saying that "all barre chords are the same" is a totally misleading and fallacious comment.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#12
Switching just takes practice like all things, just practice the "hendrix" grip into the standard grip back and forth. It will become second nature eventually and in fact serve you very very well in the future being able to do a thumb over the top for a root.
I learned bold as love (JM version) recently and i cant say how much it improved my playing and creativity, really was a well worth time refining unorthodox techniques.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#13
Quote by RicketyCricket
hey, been playing for about 3 months and realized the way i hold a few open chords is way different than the way i hold barre chords. For chords like Am or E I hold the neck resting on my palm and my thumb is mostly hanging over the top with the first knuckle from the tip of the thumb making contact with the neck. For barre chords the only thing making contact with the neck is the tip and bottom of my thumb. Until now it hasn't caused problems but I'm noticing progress on my switches from F to open chords is really slow. I'd much prefer to switch to the right habit now rather than later. Thanks a lot for any help.


When you're trying to change from C (an open chord), to the F barre at the first, the fastest way to do it is to use the "Hendrix grip" that others have described. (The thumb frets the low E string to F)!

However, this hold is its most effective only on barre chords formed from the E major open voice. It doesn't work as well for barre chords formed from the A major open form, and it doesn't work as well for chords that will be modified. An example of this would be turn the F barre into F7, or F sus4. Here the textbook hold would work the best.

If you don't get into the habit of dropping your wrist well under the neck when playing most barre chords, you also miss the opportunity of playing some single note runs while maintaining the barre on a given fret.

In short, the "Hendrix grip" limits your mobility quite a bit. It works well, but once you apply it, it limits your options.