#1
What are the advantages of owning/learning bass? I have been playing guitar for around 2 years and am fairly good at it so i have been looking at getting a cheap bass guitar. However, i am unsure if this is a good idea, having spent some time on a few basses i found them limiting so i would have to go for a 5-string, which sadly raises the price considerably. Is it worth the investment for me? Alternativly i'll put the money towards a new amp

I have looked at the follwing basses, which is least awful?
http://www.woodbrass.com/en/squier-electric-bass-affinity-series-jazz-bass-v-5-strings-black-p26927-af833.html squier affinity 5

http://www.guitarandampshop.co.uk/acatalog/Stagg_BC300_5-BK_5_String_Electric_Bass_Guitar_Black.html Stagg 5string(my current fav cos it has 24 frets and looks nicer than the others

http://www.gak.co.uk/en/peavey-milestone-5-burgundy-red/17471

i play whatever i'm physically able to and my budget is £150 absolute max
Quote by ErikLensherr
It's threads like this that separate grammar Nazis from only mildly anti-Semitic grammar conservatives.
Last edited by teh_goon at Sep 13, 2011,
#2
With a budget of 150 you could easily find a used Squier VM Jazz. Those things rock (literally).
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#3
Quote by teh_goon
What are the advantages of owning/learning bass?

The advantage of learning to play the bass would be that you know how to play the bass. Whether or not its your primary instrument, learning to play it and really appreciate and get involved with it helps to broaden your horizons and will just make you a better, more well-rounded musician.

Whether or not its worth it is entirely up to you. Do you want to learn to play bass? If yes, then it should be worth it. You can't really learn to play bass without a bass.

And out of the 3 basses you listed, I'd put my vote in for the Peavey Milestone.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#4
^ +1

Affinity's and Stagg in general are no-no.

But for 150 you should definitely consider used. Like, as suggested before, the Squier VM Jazz.
Or alternatively perhaps a Peavey Grind 5, Ibanez GSR205, Ibanez SR305.
Maybe you'll get lucky and find one of those.
#5
I almost bought a Peavey Grind, once. Those are good, too.
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#6
Is the stagg really that much worse? I have a stagg strat copy that's pretty good, and the only problems i had were my fault. I say this because features wise and looks wise i prefer the stagg, and looks are pretty important for me and this needs to pull double duty as an attractivwe ornament

i can;t really go used as i'm hoping my mam will pay for most of it and she won't buy me a second hand one/ i can't be arsed checking them out
Quote by ErikLensherr
It's threads like this that separate grammar Nazis from only mildly anti-Semitic grammar conservatives.
Last edited by teh_goon at Sep 14, 2011,
#7
I'd go for the peavey. I've played that bass in a 4 string version and it's pretty nice. If not that, look into an ibanez or a higher end squier (stay away from affinity series).

And in regards to your thread title... Do you want a bass? Yes. Yes you do.
ESP/LTD F-50
1989 Kramer Showster
Rogue RADH Acoustic
Fender CD-60 Acoustic
Washburn XB-100 4 string
Peavey Millenium AC BXP
Fender Rumble 150
Crate BV60H Head
Crate BV412 Cab
Vox AD15VT
#8
Quote by teh_goon
However, i am unsure if this is a good idea, having spent some time on a few basses i found them limiting so i would have to go for a 5-string,




In my opinion, you should at least start with a 4 string. A big part of bass is muting the other strings that you're not playing, and more strings just makes it harder. Also, one you start learning, you'll realize that there's a lot you can do with a 4 string, and 5 strings don't really add that much. Also, if you ever get into slapping, the strings are a lot closer together on a 5 string which makes it way harder.
Last edited by Donkey_Punch at Sep 14, 2011,
#9
Well, being a guitarist and a bassist, let me ask, what amp do you have now?

I've used affinities nearly my entire bass playing experience out of necessity or otherwise and it suited me fine as is, and mods over time just make them better. My current one I stripped of paint and finish to find a beautiful 2-3 piece body underneath and I'm giving it a stain finish. the hardware works, but a investment of $50-$100 I guess euros would get you a swell bass.

Also, lots of guitarists come to this page asking for advice about basses and always say the idea of a 4 string is limiting, and you need more strings. BASS IS NOT GUITAR, go to any concert, and you're going to see 4 stringers probably 8/10 times and 9/10 of those guys will be playing a Fender P or J bass or some iteration of it. More strings do provide an extended range, but they require a sizeable amp to sound good, cost more as mentioned, and aren't there to be wanked around on like a guitar. Bass is about the groove, there is melody, but you generally are not there to shred if you are, you're better off sticking to guitar.

But again you'd need a bass amp, not a guitar amp. And To that extent, what guitar amp do you have, if it's at all groan worthy or not gig worthy I suggest you improve that before you get into a whole new instrument
#10
i have a £100 ss amp, a chord, i have plans to upgrade but it will take around a year.
i don't have or plan to buy a bass amp, altough i could get a hideously cheap sx shitbox amp for about £20 or something of my sister. would this be worth it bearing in mind the true awfulness of the amp/ guitar's pickups weighed against being able to use it with my fuzz pedal?

Also, as perhaps i should have put in the op, i already play guitar, keyboard, ukulele and harmonica to a certain extent and on top of my going to uni soon, playing bass would have to have a significant advantage to my musical skills/be really fun to be worth the time invested in it. I know i would enjoy having a bass, i'm just not sure if it's worth the money

In my opinion, you should at least start with a 4 string

Does it really make that much difference? without wishing any disrespect to bassists, i have played bass before and found the fundamentals virtually identical to guitar, and i found it strangly uncomfortable/limited somehow without a fifth string, and this was not just a rubbish cheap bass. Thanks for the advice thou, this was something which hadn't occured to me, how much closwer together will the strings typically be?
Quote by ErikLensherr
It's threads like this that separate grammar Nazis from only mildly anti-Semitic grammar conservatives.
Last edited by teh_goon at Sep 15, 2011,
#11
Quote by teh_goon
how much closwer together will the strings typically be?

A few millimeters. The string spacing at the bridge averages around 19mm for your usual 4 string, and you're looking at around 17mm for your usual 5-er. Ibanez SR 5 strings run a little tighter, around 16.5mm IIRC.

It doesn't seem like a lot, but for some people it can make a huge difference.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#12
that dosen't sound problematic, i'll have to try one first of course, but it dosen't sound liek a problem
Quote by ErikLensherr
It's threads like this that separate grammar Nazis from only mildly anti-Semitic grammar conservatives.
#13
Quote by teh_goon


Does it really make that much difference? without wishing any disrespect to bassists, i have played bass before and found the fundamentals virtually identical to guitar, and i found it strangly uncomfortable/limited somehow without a fifth string, and this was not just a rubbish cheap bass. Thanks for the advice thou, this was something which hadn't occured to me, how much closwer together will the strings typically be?



The only reason you found it limiting is because you're coming from guitar. I thought the same thing too, but once you start learning you realize there is a lot you can do with a 4 string.

One more thing, generally you need to look harder and pay more for an amp that will actually be able to make the low b string sound good.


Quote by askrere

Also, lots of guitarists come to this page asking for advice about basses and always say the idea of a 4 string is limiting, and you need more strings. BASS IS NOT GUITAR, go to any concert, and you're going to see 4 stringers probably 8/10 times and 9/10 of those guys will be playing a Fender P or J bass or some iteration of it. More strings do provide an extended range, but they require a sizeable amp to sound good, cost more as mentioned, and aren't there to be wanked around on like a guitar. Bass is about the groove, there is melody, but you generally are not there to shred if you are, you're better off sticking to guitar.



Also, listen to this guy. If you want to sit there and just put out a wall of notes, bass is not for you.
Last edited by Donkey_Punch at Sep 15, 2011,
#14
Quote by askrere
Well, being a guitarist and a bassist, let me ask, what amp do you have now?

I've used affinities nearly my entire bass playing experience out of necessity or otherwise and it suited me fine as is, and mods over time just make them better. My current one I stripped of paint and finish to find a beautiful 2-3 piece body underneath and I'm giving it a stain finish. the hardware works, but a investment of $50-$100 I guess euros would get you a swell bass.

Also, lots of guitarists come to this page asking for advice about basses and always say the idea of a 4 string is limiting, and you need more strings. BASS IS NOT GUITAR, go to any concert, and you're going to see 4 stringers probably 8/10 times and 9/10 of those guys will be playing a Fender P or J bass or some iteration of it. More strings do provide an extended range, but they require a sizeable amp to sound good, cost more as mentioned, and aren't there to be wanked around on like a guitar. Bass is about the groove, there is melody, but you generally are not there to shred if you are, you're better off sticking to guitar.

But again you'd need a bass amp, not a guitar amp. And To that extent, what guitar amp do you have, if it's at all groan worthy or not gig worthy I suggest you improve that before you get into a whole new instrument
funny... Ive been playing (guitar) for about 2 years. First year was all learning chords and simple stuff on an acoustic. I picked up a Gibson Les Paul for Christmas (Studio version) and didnt play it very much because I was totally intimidated and frustrated with my level of suck. I started playing with a buddy of mine who plays guitar and I went out and bought a bass. I picked up a really nice Fender Jazz bass for $600 and a 30w fender bass amp. I played it for like a month then realized I really wanted to play guitar after all and just needed to work through the suck.

I rarely play the bass for fun, but I LOVE having it. I have a nice looper and will play some simple bass lines with my little drum kit plugged in and I have myself a custom backtrack to jam too. Its also great when friends hang because there is another instrument to jam too. Sometimes it just cool to play with.

That being said I suck.. I dont practice and I dont think about playing bass.. its a great instrument though and the little playing I do do probably makes me a better guitar player.
he of tranquil mind
#15
append^ I also bought it during a time when I had some extra cash on hand. I wouldnt get one now though if I didnt have one, I would buy a 12 string acoustic electric, but I still love having that bass and I will never get rid of it.
he of tranquil mind
#16
I am not suggesting if you play guitar you can't play bass, I was saying if you want to play bass, be mindful you're not playing a guitar. regardless I'm mostly giving him advice on his question, But also suggesting that for him spending his money on a cheap bass won't broaden his horizons as a musician in university, like having a solid guitar amp and already knowing how to play will.

Also cause the TS said this, YOU DO NOT USE A GUITAR AMP FOR BASS. Also why buy a bass, at any cost then go out knowing you're going to play it through the wrong amp or a self admitted POS amp.