#1
I was just wondering what people's experiences with guitar teachers were/are like. I never had one and owe my knowledge of guitar playing to the internet; specifically this site. I would call my overall abilities mediocre and I have been playing for 4 years. I feel as if I hit a wall last year and my playing abilities have not progressed since. Several friends informed me that it is extremely sad that I only know one scale by heart, and that that is something I should really be working on.

When I sit down and play, I usually play along to music I like for a warm up and then try to put my own material together. I would like to learn to be able to write good music over my rhythm playing. What do your guitar teachers have you do, and do you feel you have benifited from them?
#2
My first guitar teacher discussed politics with me and explained the idea of "fretting notes."

My second guitar teacher taught me "Mary Jane's Last Dance" and booked me five gigs with his band.

I don't think either one of those was quite normal.
Money beats soul every time.

Money beats soul...every time.

Money...beats soul...every...goddamn...time.
#4
My guitar teacher was the most influential person in my life musically. He turned me on to so much good music and really made playing guitar fun for me. Although, we didn't go too far into music theory and such. He only really taught me for about a year and a half and after that we just jammed. He's now one of my dearest friends and I couldn't imagine what my life would be like if I hadn't met him. Granted he was only five years older than me and most teachers are probably old farts, so it was easier for us to get along. So for me the decision to get a teacher was the most important decision of my life.
#5
Quote by xevious1
My guitar teacher taught me scales, modes, how to create interesting rhythms, how to combine different techniques to create a great solo, he helped me refine my techniques and play cleaner.

best investment ever.


Quote by abacus!
My guitar teacher was the most influential person in my life musically. He turned me on to so much good music and really made playing guitar fun for me. Although, we didn't go too far into music theory and such. He only really taught me for about a year and a half and after that we just jammed. He's now one of my dearest friends and I couldn't imagine what my life would be like if I hadn't met him. Granted he was only five years older than me and most teachers are probably old farts, so it was easier for us to get along. So for me the decision to get a teacher was the most important decision of my life.


Where did you guys find your guitar teachers?
#7
I've said this a few times, but I'll say it again. While my guitar teacher has been quite significant in my ability progression, in retrospect, he's not a very good teacher. Nonetheless, he's still better than me at guitar (obviously) and theory.

I took lessons with him for about a year. He asked me what type of music I listened to on the first lesson. I told him I listened to mostly metal. For some reason, he decided that the only way to play metal was to play a lot of Metallica songs. He had me photocopy a few Metallica tab books and we started from there. It got so bad I didn't feel motivated to practice at all, because while I did listen to some Metallica, I found some of the songs quite unpleasant.

Only occasionally he did give me other songs, such as Flight of the Bumblebee (which, by the way, is really fun to play), and we worked on Erotomania by Dream Theater, though not much, and I learned the whole song by myself because it was interesting, and not because he pushed me to.

Also occasionally, he'd teach me a little theory, but because my theory was pretty horrible at that time, while I understood most of it, I'd forget them the minute I get home.
#8
It depends on your goals. You want to shred and be a virtuoso? check out Tom Hess Online or George Bellas Instructional DVDs. If you like rock and metal Tom Hess is the guy for you. Leading online expert. I have taken lessons from him and will continue them. They are excellent and will help you with the EXACT problems you stated.

If you sign up put my name in there as to who referred you - mikesocarras.

If not there are other great instructors out there. you have to keep searching.
Last edited by mikesocarras at Sep 14, 2011,
#9
Quote by mikesocarras
It depends on your goals. You want to shred and be a virtuoso? check out Tom Hess Online or George Bellas Instructional DVDs. If you like rock and metal Tom Hess is the guy for you. Leading online expert. I have taken lessons from him and will continue them. They are excellent and will help you with the EXACT problems you stated.

If you sign up put my name in there as to who referred you - mikesocarras.

If not there are other great instructors out there. you have to keep searching.



*checks join date,


Are you an ad-bot or something?
#10
Quote by Zeletros
*checks join date,


Are you an ad-bot or something?


I was kinda thinking the same thing
#11
My teacher was my dad's friend's nephew. I just asked my parents if i could take lessons and they asked around to see if anyone knew how to play. If you can't find anyone then go to your local music shop and see if they have some teachers.
#12
My guitar teacher was simultaneously my music theory teacher and the head of the music department at the college I went to. I definitely benefited from it. For the guitar lesson portion, I was shown chords and their inversions, how to voice lead with them, given lead sheets of jazz standards to comp to and play solos over, made to site read some classical guitar pieces for two guitars, introduced to the notion of planeing, asked to write modal pieces, and more.
#13
I'm mostly self taught, but I did have a couple of lessons right at the start where I was shown the basic chords, how to hold & tune a guitar and the major & pentatonic scales.

About 15 years later I realised I hadn't actually progressed in my abilities for a few years, so I had a couple more lessons (with Rob Chappers) who in the space of a couple of lessons gave me enough that I'm still developing myself today.

I'm sure if I'd been having lessons constantly throughout the past 20 years I'd be a lot better than I am now, but then if I'd practiced constantly during that time I could probably say the same thing.

Teachers are good, so long as you find the right one. However, despite that and even though I'm the first to admit that I'm not the best guitarist out there by a long way, I'm proud of the fact that I'm mostly self taught.
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#14
Quote by Zeletros
Never had any teachers on any instrument I play.


Best investment ever

#15
I've been teaching for over 20 years. My goal with every student, is to get them to the point where they have proper technique, understand what it takes to play in the style they want to play, and be able to continue learning on their own (know how to practice).
I also try to expose them to as much music as possible.
Not everyone wants to learn theory, scales, or how to read, so I don't force it on them.

You can learn a lot on your own from books and the internet, but you won't know if you're doing something improperly, such as hand positioning, fingering, etc. A good teacher should help you avoid/correct mistakes, as well as provide you with information.
I'd like to help, but not as much as I'd like not to.


"To be successful, you need to be a good musician. To be popular, you just need to be fashionable" - Ritchie Blackmore
#16
A good teacher is worth more than you can imagine. I can't tell you what to expect because a good teacher will tailor their teachings to what the student needs. What makes a good teacher for one person is often different to another so it's difficult to recommend anything.
#17
I am learning guitar by my teacher's help. He really did so well. I awe him my ability in playing guitar.
#18
Quote by mikesocarras

If you sign up put my name in there as to who referred you - mikesocarras.


Not adbot but close enough
#19
A good teacher will inspire you and improve every aspect of your playing. A really useful thing is just there's a expert taking a long view on your playing and can give you advice from a perspective decades ahead of yours.

Like, "It's a good idea to get both salaried and self-employed teaching work as it helps you with your tax and state pension". Never would have found that out.
#20
I owe it to marty schwartz :P i had two guitar teachers who done nothing for me and wasted alot of my time and money. Since im quite experciened at piano, i decided to try the guitar again, thanks to my music sheet knowledge and marty's scales explaintion, ive done far better in a year than i did with my guitar teachers