#1
Hey guys!
Im going to begin to look for rock/metal bands to join in my area. Basicly, i was wondering, what things i would need, technique wise, gear wise, so on so forth.

I used search but didnt really find anything, so hopefully i can get lots of info here, and maybe someone else will down the line.

I know i will need a bass (duurrr), but i also have an AmpegBA115 (has D.i. out). Would there be anything else i would need gear wise?

Also, what techniques should i know, ive been playing bass for a few months, and im working on my 3 finger technique (so far it is up to 1/8 notes at 150b/m), and my fretting technique (fingertips, not flats of fingers - problem carried over from guitar and only recently pointed out to me). Other then that im ok, as far as im concerned.

It would also be nice to hear things that i should look for and be carefull of when joining a band, and even some past experiences!

I would love to learn, and I think joining a band is the next thing i need to do to improve my playing (and keep my interest).
Thanks!!
Quote by thunderbritches
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#2
1) instrument
2) means of connecting your instrument to the provided gear(cables), if you rent a rep space
3) whatever you require to comfortably play(picks, pedals if you WISH to)


It depends on the band, most music styles do not demand much, but some do


Talk to the band, ask what they want and tell what you offer
Last edited by Zeletros at Sep 14, 2011,
#3
You just need gear that goes loud enough to go over a drum set, basicly get what sounds good to you and you should be fine. You don't need to invest hundreds/thousands of dollars in the start since you will have to search for a good sound in the band.

Technique wise there is no priority, just go out and make some music, you'r playing will improve automaticly!
#4
An amp that gets louder than a drum set
Transportation or the practice space.

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#5
Sweet, so far im good gear wise then
The amp is loud, but for some venues i can just use a DI.
Got my P plates (aussie) on fridays (ahhhhh the freedom of driving on your own)

So now it is just practice more till i find something then i guess?
Quote by thunderbritches
I would still call him a regular musician...just a very irregular person lol

Warwick Pro Series Corvette
Hartke HA 3500
Genz Benz LS410
#6
Quote by Cantplay4penuts
Sweet, so far im good gear wise then
The amp is loud, but for some venues i can just use a DI.



I mean you could do that... if you wan't absolutely Zero control over your tone at all and risk the possibility of there either NOT being a DI available or their being no feedback monitors. These sort of places DO exists, especially if you're playing outside.

I'd recommend saving up and buying an Ashdown MAG300 or a similarly Watted amp and a Cab, you only need one to start with.
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#7
The most important thing is being a nice person and getting on with the band you want to join. And if they've got stuff written, learn it before you turn up.

If you can't play the songs, then you probably shouldn't really be auditioning in the first place.
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#9
Quote by ChemicalFire
I mean you could do that... if you wan't absolutely Zero control over your tone at all and risk the possibility of there either NOT being a DI available or their being no feedback monitors. These sort of places DO exists, especially if you're playing outside.

I'd recommend saving up and buying an Ashdown MAG300 or a similarly Watted amp and a Cab, you only need one to start with.


when i use the ampegs DI, the amp still uses it's speaker, so i can always use that as a "moniter" or something like that, but as for being heard at the back, with the p.a. (if there is one), i am up to the mercy of the sound desk dude.

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Quote by thunderbritches
I would still call him a regular musician...just a very irregular person lol

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Hartke HA 3500
Genz Benz LS410
#10
Quote by JustRooster
Bring hard lemonade. Always worked for me.

Fixed.

seriously, don't be creepy, ask about things (Does this tone sound a little too trebly?) make dumb jokes.

You'll do fine.
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#11
In my experience with professional bands, if you are planning on doing live shows, it really does not take much equipment at all. Preferably, using as little equipment as possible is ideal. In reality, all I or anyone else ever needed was simply the bass guitar itself, the instrument cable, the amp (and it's speaker cables if required) and it's power cable. That's it. Most venues have a way of setting everything else up for you, so it's really not much a hassle. Of course, if you play certain shows, then you may need to at least have a DI cable for their PA if they even have one.

As for techniques, it really depends on the band you are going to play in and what you expect to play in it. I've found that honestly, as long as you can just finger/pick bass, then you are golden. Any ability to play slap, tap, etc is all just icing on the cake, but if you can do those things, then I strongly encourage figuring out how to throw them in.


tl;dr
Bass, amp, self = all you need.
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#12
As a few others have mentioned, when joining a band, a good attitude is more important than gear. You could show up with a truck full of gear, pre-prepared groupies and Fat Bob the roadie, but without the right mindset, it's a waste.

You can show up with your broken Squier, dodgy cables and almost blown amp, and if you guys get on, those problems can be overcome. (Be it lending/renting/chipping in etc).
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#13
Quote by ToolBass_dude

You can show up with your broken Squier, dodgy cables and almost blown amp, and if you guys get on, those problems can be overcome. (Be it lending/renting/chipping in etc).


That's exactly right. I wouldn't want some guy with all this gear who can play extremely well but is a total d*ck. I'm sorry, but that's just me. Because in the long run, you will be spending so many hours with these people and if you all can't get along it will break apart, mark my words. A good personality and respecting others will get you far.
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#14
Thread = tl;dr.

What you need to be in a band:

1. A solid quality bass guitar, good enough so it can withstand knocks and scrapes and still work. Squier VM/CV/Deluxe, Ibanez GSR, Yamaha BB, Warwick Rockbass, etc. >£200 price range if new.

2. At least 3x as many watts as your guitarist's amp and enough to be heard over the drums. 300w is a safe bet and usually cheap enough too. Ashdown, Peavey, Kustom, Harke and Laney are good brands to look at.

3. Either a few good quality cables or a load of cheap and disposable ones.

4. An electric tuner, god damn it get an electric tuner. **** you if you're in a band and don't use an electric tuner. A drum machine is good for writing basslines too, best to get something with a tuner and a drum machine too like a Zoom multi effects pedal.

5. Patience and understanding. Singers are dicks, lead guitarists are dicks, rhythm guitarists are bitter and drummers are retarded. God knows what you might be so bear that in mind.

6. Be prepared for the band to break up before you get a single gig.

Its all very well saying a good personality will overcome shit gear, then again that's total shit. Having been in a band with people using the cheapest shit they can find (not out of poverty but out of cheapness) it is ****ing infuriating; they sound like crap, can't keep in tune, can't play properly because of the setup.
Last edited by Spaz91 at Sep 17, 2011,
#15
Thanks everyone! I have pretty much all the stuff mentioned, except my amp being underpowered (watt wise, im not sure if it could cut through better then some other amps or what but thats not something that is able to be judged i here i guess). I cant really comment on how others see me either, but im not a dick haha.
Thanks for all the help and advice.

I also hope this answers other peoples questions. The search feature is neato
Quote by thunderbritches
I would still call him a regular musician...just a very irregular person lol

Warwick Pro Series Corvette
Hartke HA 3500
Genz Benz LS410
#16
your amp being underpowered can be a real issue. i had to upgrade from a 600 watt with a 15" speaker to a 1000 watt with an 18" can and 2 10's to be heard clearly over our very loud (but very good) drummer, who's a heavy hitter. we were playing metal and sort of punk. on the other hand, my 600 watt setup was enough for rock and hard rock with other drummers, and we played a show where i used another bass player's 200 watt rig and you could hear the bass fine, probably due to the location. so it really depends on the type of music and individual band.
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#17
Be able to play with a drummer. That means both timing (locking in and whatnot), and having an amp that's loud enough (300W is the minimum most people recommend). Other than that, be willing to work with other people, and make sure it's not you who's making the band sound bad (keep bass in tune, don't scoop mids to harsh, etc.)