#1
hey guys. i've been working on learning the notes for a couple days now and have stayed to the 6th and 5th strings and only whole notes on the first 12 frets so far. now that I feel comfortable with that I thought I'd add in the accidentals but realized it may be double the work if I try to memorize both names. Do you have just a preferred symbol that you use most of the time unless the sheet music says otherwise or something?
Last edited by RicketyCricket at Sep 14, 2011,
#2
All you have to remember are the notes on either side of the enharmonic. A A#/Bb B
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#3
I think it's recommended to learn both names of the enharmonic notes because depending on the key of the music, it may have flats OR sharps in it's key signature and being able to immediately find the note you need would prove very helpful.

If that makes any sense at all?
#5
Quote by RicketyCricket
hey guys. i've been working on learning the notes for a couple days now and have stayed to the 6th and 5th strings and only whole notes on the first 12 frets so far. now that I feel comfortable with that I thought I'd add in the accidentals but realized it may be double the work if I try to memorize both names. Do you have just a preferred symbol that you use most of the time unless the sheet music says otherwise or something?


Why are you trying to learn them and use sheet music? The way you are going about it seems like the long way to me. If you get tired of it, and wonder if there might be a better way...you might want to contact me. I teach things like this for a living. Also Guitar Munky I think will give you free lessons via Skype, so maybe he'll post here with an offer to do so.

If we can help, let me know.

Best,

Sean
#6
Thanks for the help guys. I'll definitely make sure to not just associate them with just 1 of their names then.

@zen: I'm really surprised at how quickly that exercise helped... When I first started I would play a random note and try to figure out what it was but this way is much faster.

@sean: I wanna learn it basically so i can hear a piece of music and have an idea of what's going on, and maybe how I would improve or change it. I'm sure that's a lot easier when you can think change "x" note to "y" rather than saying "that one note". And thanks for the offer but I can't afford lessons, so regardless of how long it takes I'm definitely doing it.
#7
I used certain notes as refference when i learned the fretboard. like the notes on the 5th fret (or 4th on B) used to tune, and the notes on the 12th fret being the same as the open strings, and i memorized the notes for the first 4 frets of each string. after you get started like that the rest kinda comes easy. instead of memorizing thins like "A#" or Bb" i would just sorta think "well i know this is the note between A and B," and sheet music came a while after this and i just sorta looked at the note and then if there was a # its up one fret and a b down one instead of specifically having it memorized as where the #'s and b's are. after a while i figured out the entire fretboard but i didn't bother jumping right into it and memorizing each note on each string one at a time, it sounds pretty boring :p