#1
I have a 4 year old little boy, that has been diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). I know most of you are thinking, what?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensory_processing_disorder

I had never heard of it before, but apparently it's fairly common. For the most part, my son is pretty normal, but he has his moments that are really difficult.
Just wondreing if any of you guys (or girls), have this condition, and if you could tell me what it's like as you get older.

Thanks.
I'd like to help, but not as much as I'd like not to.


"To be successful, you need to be a good musician. To be popular, you just need to be fashionable" - Ritchie Blackmore
#2
Never heard of it. Sorry to hear that man. This probably isn't the right place to post to be honest. There will be some dick who will try and make a joke about it.
#3
I feel is pain obviously not the same pain he feels though, as our feelings are completey different but....

No I am sorry to hear about that, if you say your son is pretty normal then your son should be fine

chin up

Edit: I made a joke but then related to the topic
Quote by lambofgod127
btw im in hs and im almost 18 so if u do think she was flirting with me dont say that its wrong im almost a grown man.




༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽ WE ARE ROB ༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽
Last edited by slash_GNR666 at Sep 14, 2011,
#4
I know it's not the same, but my sister is autistic, so I kind of understand where you're at (I'm the overprotective older brother :/ )
What I do know is that the key to coping with special needs is to remember that they're not doing anything deliberately, it can be unbearably frustrating sometimes, but the only way to help them through what they're going through is to be calm and kind.

SPD sounds a little less like this though, maybe he'll have irrational fears associated with it (Unpleasant coping with noise for example) It might come into play there? I'm sorry man, I hope it's not too hard on the little guy.
Music is an art form that celebrates potential. So long as you're looking for it, you'll always find it.
#5
Does that mean he can see sound and hear colour etc?

Wikipedia didn't give much help What's the difference between people with SPD and people without?
#6
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Does that mean he can see sound and hear colour etc?

Synesthesia.
#7
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Does that mean he can see sound and hear colour etc?

Wikipedia didn't give much help What's the difference between people with SPD and people without?



Basically everything is intensified. Something that might seem a little loud to you, will be super loud to him.
If you break his routine at all, it can cause a major breakdown. Transitioning from one thing to another can be rough, for example, if we're playing at the park, we have to tell him 15-20 minutes in advance that we're going to go home. If we just stop what were doing...it can be a disaster.
I'd like to help, but not as much as I'd like not to.


"To be successful, you need to be a good musician. To be popular, you just need to be fashionable" - Ritchie Blackmore
#8
Quote by Mr.Pink101
I know it's not the same, but my sister is autistic, so I kind of understand where you're at (I'm the overprotective older brother :/ )
What I do know is that the key to coping with special needs is to remember that they're not doing anything deliberately, it can be unbearably frustrating sometimes, but the only way to help them through what they're going through is to be calm and kind.

SPD sounds a little less like this though, maybe he'll have irrational fears associated with it (Unpleasant coping with noise for example) It might come into play there? I'm sorry man, I hope it's not too hard on the little guy.

I'm in your sig, when did I call you a pretentious twat? You seem like kind of a nice guy

Anyway, on topic, I haven't got much knowledge on the subject, but much like Mr Pink here I have at least some experience of psychic ailments. If you say he's normal, that's fine, if he's a bit of an oddball that's fine too. If he can still enjoy what life has to offer then that's really all that matters. Best wishes to you and your son!
REGGIE