#1
Practising chords:
How long do you practice chords? and What's your chord practice routine, do you take two chords and switch between them, or you have a different routine?
How long does it take you to get those changes perfectly and at what speed?
I'm just trying to get an idea of where people are at (I do realize everybody learns at different paces).
Thanks!
#2
When I first started out on guitar I would take a chord progression (say, 3-4 chords) and just cycle through them while also practising a particular strumming pattern. At first it would take me perhaps 10 seconds to successfully switch from one to another, but as with all other aspects of guitar- the more you do it, the better you become.

Nowadays I can typically switch between open and barre chords as fast as I'll ever likely need to, but sometimes a new chord will force me to take my time with it. Practise, practise, practise!
#3
I did the justinguitar i minute switching method in his beginner series for a while, go to justinguitar.com and watch them. also, play hotel california, karma police and wet sand, they're good for changes as theres a lot of them.
#4
When I was first starting out, I'd just pick a song which was fairly basic (good examples would be things like Every Rose Has It's Thorn and Knocking On Heavens Door) and practice chords by playing along to those songs. As my playing evolved, the songs I practiced became more complicated.

Don't know if it's the best thing to do or not, but it worked for me.
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#5
Well, how long have you been playing? How you practice chords depends on what you're trying to accomplish.

One method is to use part of your practice time for playing along with recorded songs. I typically do anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour every day.

Another method is using part of your practice time to practice problem chords. You know... those chords you have problems getting in and out of without causing a train wreck. I'm currently taking jazz guitar and some of those chords really contort the ol' fingers. I frequently take time to work on JUST those chords. Practice getting into and out of them. Five or ten minutes a night is all I devote to this type of practice. It doesn't usually take long to build the muscle memory.
#6
I don't know, I mean once one has memorized a bunch of chord shapes, the notion of practising them seems odd. You've internalized them. But there are some "excersizes" of a sort that can be made with chords. Going through inversions up and down the neck would be one of them. Or going through all of the chords that are built off of a certain scale. Or going through the circle of 5ths with II V I's. I suppose if there are certain chord shapes your fingers aren't used to, the only way to practise them is just to keep playing them until you're used to it.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Sep 14, 2011,
#7
What I do is take two chords that I have trouble with and practice switching in between them for 30 min. and every five minutes or so increase the tempo, until I get to a decent speed. Is that a good way to practice, any suggestions?
#8
A fantastic exercise for working on chord changes and improving finger dexterity is Joe Satriani's "Diminished Chord Relay"
#9
I found a song with the chords that i was using and i'd just keep practicing the song. (ex Tom Dooley for D and A chords).
This would at least make practice a bit fun.
#10
Quote by SilverSpurs616
A fantastic exercise for working on chord changes and improving finger dexterity is Joe Satriani's "Diminished Chord Relay"


Amen, brother. That exercise is awesome!
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#11
When i first started i used to play D C G A...

F and Bm were a bitch but they are become very comfortable now. Even C sharp minor..

I pretty much gained very comfortable speed after 6 months. However if i lay off the guitar for a few days it is a little hard when it pick it back up and My fretting fingers sometimes arent as quick until i've practiced a bit.
#12
Quote by KG6_Steven

One method is to use part of your practice time for playing along with recorded songs. I typically do anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour every day.


That's one of the best methods. I keep wanting to do that but I never get around to it. Playing with a metronome or a recorded song is the best way to build speed and discipline.