#1
Now before anyone mentions anything about using the searchbar,
yes i've already done my fair share of research but was wondering if anyone
had any personal tips on how i can improve my newbish mixes?
mainly right now im just recording (and trying to improve) a heavy bright guitar tone and a softer crunchy also bright guitar tone and using ezdrummer for the drums for right now till i attempt to record my actual drummer.
I'm looking for a more professional sound something very tight and not so "live" session sounding.
i know this is very vague question with a horrible description of what im actually going for, but if anyone can give me tips or ideas on how to improve my recording quality or anything sort of help i would deeply appreciate it.
thank you.

EDIT: i just posted a recording on my profile so you can get an idea of what my tone is like right now im still trying to improve it so don't bash me too bad.
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Last edited by aeromakesmusic at Sep 15, 2011,
#2
What are you using to record & mix on?

Without knowing specific problems, it's hard to provide any specific advice other than to keep practicing - my first few mixes weren't that great but I got the hang of it eventually.

If you're using software, are you sure your PC has the processing power & good enough sound card to get the quality you'll need? If it's a multitracker have you thoroughly read the manual so you know you're getting the best out of it?
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#3
Quote by GaryBillington
What are you using to record & mix on?

Without knowing specific problems, it's hard to provide any specific advice other than to keep practicing - my first few mixes weren't that great but I got the hang of it eventually.

If you're using software, are you sure your PC has the processing power & good enough sound card to get the quality you'll need? If it's a multitracker have you thoroughly read the manual so you know you're getting the best out of it?

Im
using reaper as my DAW and recording with a alesis multimix 4 usb mixer as my interface for my guitar to PC connection. and for my guitar tones im using a floor pod plus to get my distortion,cleans,low break up tones.I did try using a nick 8505 amp and some impulses for a while but found that i got a sound pretty identical to it using my floor pod plus so i just stuck to that since it used up less processing power for my pc.
any tips/advice?
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#5
Quote by Odirunn
Posting clips so we can hear what you've got will be most helpful.

I just posted a recording of what my recordings are coming out like on my profile.
check it out and tell what it needs please?
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#6
WFT did I just listen to? Was a mess, no structure to it, guitars everywhere... I'd start with simple Verse, Chours Verse songs to get your double tracking and mixing skills up to par, then start trying to do the crazy progressive psychedelic stuff.

First, record two tracks of your rhythm guitars, pan both hard left and hard right, high pass them at around 50-100hz, run bass guitar up center, run drums up center, run lead up center, high pass lead at 50hz higher than your rhythm guitars, then boost mids.

That's a simple way to get a decent recording without getting into compression and the such.
#7
Quote by ethan_hanus
WFT did I just listen to? Was a mess, no structure to it, guitars everywhere... I'd start with simple Verse, Chours Verse songs to get your double tracking and mixing skills up to par, then start trying to do the crazy progressive psychedelic stuff.

First, record two tracks of your rhythm guitars, pan both hard left and hard right, high pass them at around 50-100hz, run bass guitar up center, run drums up center, run lead up center, high pass lead at 50hz higher than your rhythm guitars, then boost mids.

That's a simple way to get a decent recording without getting into compression and the such.

lol I'll take that as a compliment thank you.
anyways thanks a lot for the tips and about compression how should i go on about using compression on my guitars to get better quality?
i know you probably don't want to explain everything like this to a newb like me but
would this help making transitions smoother like from riff to riff? or what would i need to do in order to get smooth transitions from part to part on songs like from a chorus to a verse?
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#8
Don't worry about EQing, compression or anything like that just yet. Just get use to getting your levels right. You only really need to use such effects to correct any imperfections in the sound.

EQ is to correct any imperfections, like too much boom, masking frequency's, cutting unwanted noise and rumble that muddy the instrument. etc...

Compression is just to keep your levels in check, for example: you might get 1 snare hit that's louder than the other snare hits. So using a compressor will keep it in check giving a more level sound.

Limiters are for increasing the volume of the source or to stop something clipping.

EZ Drummer sounds great as it is, you don't need to do any processing to it. Hence the name, it's already been pre processed. If you want a tighter sound lower the Drum Room Microphone and make the kick and snare levels slightly more prominent.

Guitars, just pan one hard left and the other hard right and have the bass in the centre just sitting below the level of the kick. If you can get a good balance without using all the effects plugins you're on the way to getting a good sound.
Last edited by MrTinkle at Sep 15, 2011,
#9
Quote by MrTinkle
Don't worry about EQing, compression or anything like that just yet. Just get use to getting your levels right. You only really need to use such effects to correct any imperfections in the sound.

EQ is to correct any imperfections, like too much boom, masking frequency's, cutting unwanted noise and rumble that muddy the instrument. etc...

Compression is just to keep your levels in check, for example: you might get 1 snare hit that's louder than the other snare hits. So using a compressor will keep it in check giving a more level sound.

Limiters are for increasing the volume of the source or to stop something clipping.

EZ Drummer sounds great as it is, you don't need to do any processing to it. Hence the name, it's already been pre processed. If you want a tighter sound lower the Drum Room Microphone and make the kick and snare levels slightly more prominent.

Guitars, just pan one hard left and the other hard right and have the bass in the centre just sitting below the level of the kick. If you can get a good balance without using all the effects plugins you're on the way to getting a good sound.

thank you for your post i'll be sure to keep this in mind.
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#10
Quote by MrTinkle
Don't worry about EQing, compression or anything like that just yet. Just get use to getting your levels right. You only really need to use such effects to correct any imperfections in the sound.

I'm probably coming across as a bit of a d!ck (and don't worry lockwolf, I'll let you take the job back in a minute ) by correcting most of your posts, but I think you have the right ideas but don't fully understand all of the impact some of your knowledge has to other aspects of engineering, and I don't want anyone else to be improperly informer by it.

For every scientific aspect of recording/mixing, there is also the creative and artistic aspect you still need to consider. Most of what you said is about being 'technically perfect' to the original sound... not something we often want, creatively, as our analogue world is also far from perfect (acoustically, but also philosophically *ahem*).


EQ is to correct any imperfections, like too much boom, masking frequency's, cutting unwanted noise and rumble that muddy the instrument. etc...

EQ is also necessary to shape the elements of a mix to give a heightened sense of clarity, and to bring elements out to the forefront when they need to shine, but also pull them back when they are required to make up the background (like the focus of a camera lens).

Compression is just to keep your levels in check, for example: you might get 1 snare hit that's louder than the other snare hits. So using a compressor will keep it in check giving a more level sound.

Compression is also used by most top-level producers as an effect to impact on the sound and tonality, and to add punch. It isn't just to balance levels, as automation does this far more naturally (so would be better from a technical viewpoint, in an ideal world). If you're after perfect recreation of the original source, automation > compression every time... unless you're fat and lazy, and can't be bothered to go through and automate the levels.

Limiters are for increasing the volume of the source or to stop something clipping.
Limiters do not stop clipping - they just introduce soft-clipping before the theoretical maximum level of digital audio (0dBFS). On their own, limiters don't increase volume - they just reduce peak volume, by chopping off the top of the waveform so it cannot breach a specified output level. With the addition of make-up gain, they can be used to re-boost the level towards where the peaks would have been, thus allowing you to raise the RMS level while keeping the peak level in check.

EZ Drummer sounds great as it is, you don't need to do any processing to it. Hence the name, it's already been pre processed. If you want a tighter sound lower the Drum Room Microphone and make the kick and snare levels slightly more prominent.

Personally, I find EZDrummer to be one of the worse drum programs - I am always quick to notice programmed drums on many amateur recordings these days, as are most people, but it only becomes hard when the person using them is experienced, and typically are using better samples and better programming. I would never leave a drum program un-altered though, as you will want to process a lot of things after the preset processing applied by Toontrack and the other companies I forget the names of.

Guitars, just pan one hard left and the other hard right and have the bass in the centre just sitting below the level of the kick. If you can get a good balance without using all the effects plugins you're on the way to getting a good sound.

Can work, in metal especially, but there is no 'go-to' formula for a good guitar sound, and in terms of mixing there are negatives to panning out wide with single tracks (can give horrible results when played in mono, which is still something you should take into account for translation to other systems) and can hide phase issues across the mix if you instantly pan out wide and ignore the transient balance.
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#11
Quote by DisarmGoliath

I'm probably coming across as a bit of a d!ck (and don't worry lockwolf, I'll let you take the job back in a minute ) by correcting most of your posts, but I think you have the right ideas but don't fully understand all of the impact some of your knowledge has to other aspects of engineering, and I don't want anyone else to be improperly informer by it.

For every scientific aspect of recording/mixing, there is also the creative and artistic aspect you still need to consider. Most of what you said is about being 'technically perfect' to the original sound... not something we often want, creatively, as our analogue world is also far from perfect (acoustically, but also philosophically *ahem*).



Basically my post was a dumbed down version of what you elaborated on. The reason being most people will get into the habit of button tweaking with out actually knowing what they're doing which isn't good practice. Espeshialy if you bombard them with tones and tones of info.

I think its a good start for new mixing engineers to take baby steps to start with, basic microphone placement, setting levels and getting a balanced sound with out using the extra tools. Then once they get the hang of it, start learning how you use these tools to correct, or craft a sound.

You're very much correct with your quotes
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#12
if the arrangement and performance isn't there good luck getting a mix that sounds good. you can't fit 10 pounds of crap in a 5 pound bag
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#13
Also highly worth considering - what speakers are you mixing on?

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