#1
I know schools only been going on for like a week, but I just wanted to say a couple things about it for anyone else considering it. if you really love music enough to want more than just play guitar, then its really a positive decision I think, and its not quite as unapproachable as a lot of people make it seem.

yes, crane, berklee, juliard, eastman, pretty much any good school requires you to be fairly educated and skilled before you can get in to study there, but community colleges are another option. my college has a fairly decent program with a partnership with crane so I could always at least transfer there. if you actually have the talent, then school will provide you all the things you need to learn and practice at this level. no competition to get in, inexpensive as far as college goes, and if you know nothing of playing classical it is not a problem.

theres some fairly good players who've been here awhile, a great classical teacher (hes really awesome, surprisingly for this small school) and Id say its realistic that if you have the ability to keep up with the curriculum, youd surely be more than good enough to pass an audition for a decent 4 year school after you gain some background in seriously being a musician.

I cant say that I'll end up doing well or not, but so far I dont feel too intimidated by it, I learned the first ensemble piece and it didnt go over that awfully. Im able to keep up with the theory classes and im learning proper classical technique (but its not coming overnight, its happening. I can almost make it sound like something, a lot better than ever before)

a good enough guitar to start could cost about $275. I have a cheap yamaha my teacher thinks is great for this level, its not a dog, it may not sound professional, but it certainly has pleasant tone if played properly. one of my classmates has some luthier made $8k guitar thats pretty sick. a footstool is like $20, and you'll probably want a $20 cheap music stand.

yes you have to read music, and yes you have to write it and take classes in all sorts of things aside from your instrument, but I find it very supplemental. Im learning to read pretty fast because im immersed in it all the time. and I feel like learning it all together makes the most sense probably, and definitely would make a more capable musician out of someone.

if you plan to be serious practicing is going to be your life probably. Im trying to get into a schedule. Im probably going to need time for music theory homework, about 30min-1hr aural skills/singing, At least some practice time for chorus (although im not too serious about it as long as I pass), 1hr to practice ensemble pieces, (we do quartets), and probably an hour or two for my guitar lessons. thats a LOT of practicing. I also have keyboard harmony homework, but thats an easy requirement for me at least.

and classes can run late (probably because we have a small program and they want class and performance times to be roughly similar). half the week im here from 11am to like 10pm. so im finding that if I want to be serious im going to have to cut out my social life and screwing around to do it. if your not serious about college, id say its not a good idea. but I find it exciting that even if the pieces im doing are simple now, I am going to get a chance to perform them. maybe im weird but I think its pretty awesome :p.

pretty much all I wanted to say was that a good start really is available to pretty much anyone. your not stuck getting private lessons until your good enough to get into a school, and can probably GET private lessons and the education youd need to get a into a better school right now. its not unapproachable or anything really, its just a really bad life decision if you want to make money, or are really not able to do it for some reason (but id imagine anyone could learn with enough interest,determination, and perhaps at least some spark of talent, or id at least like to think so).

yes, I have a hard time at times, Im not really sure if I personally will end up succeeding in it, but im feeling more confident every day. I actually really have fun doing it as well, so im kind of not thinking it was a bad decision anymore personally. I feel way more comfortable with myself. but if thats not an issue for you perhaps its a bad idea just because you could make more money somewhere else haha.

edit:

oh, and to everyone who always says "GET A TEACHER FIRST" bs. you dont need to. unless you plan on trying straight to get into a prestigious school or conservatory. if you end up getting a teacher who isnt serious, your going to develop bad technique and it would take longer to retrain you than it would to do it in the first place. so thats not necessary. it might help a lot if you had a good one, but not necessary at all. Im getting my first classical lessons here, and its not going badly at all yet, and my teacher sees no problem or incapability to follow so far, so thats just my 2cents on it.
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Last edited by spiroth10 at Sep 15, 2011,
#3
Im currently going to one of those schools in that conservatory strain that was mentioned. If anyone wants some advice on how to prepare an audition for that sort of thing, hit me up
#4
Yup, community colleges can provide a great education in music, and for a lot less money. You might not be able to brag about it like some people tend to do when they go to a prestigious conservatory, but if that isn't one of your goals it doesn't really matter.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 15, 2011,
#5
I have been studying Music at my community college for the last 2 and half years.

Though, I had previous knowledge from highschool in music theory, and from learning on the internet. There was still a bunch of stuff to be covered (modal borrowing, Aug6th, 12 tone, etc etc.) , and you can literally get that same knowledge at a community college, then spending a lot more at a uni.

Personally, for me going to a CC (community college) has helped a ton, mainly due to the fact that I dont have the dorming college campus distractions. I can actually focus on practice, and my music writing.

Another, thing become great friends with your music teachers. They can help recommend great teacher at other school so you know what your in for when you transfer. As well as they can help you anytime while writing, even if your not taking any classes with them.

Con: Staying at home can be a burden for a lot people. You want to get out, away from home because you have been there for 18 years. I agree, I think i need to get away. But, if the situation aint right your going to have to live with it.


Being a music major (performance/education/therapy etc) is a lot of work (If you love it, it shouldnt be ). So, just be prepared, and if anyone has any questions ill try to help out



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#6
Let us know how it goes by the end of the semester. First weeks aren't anything, lol, let's see whats changed after mid terms. I'll bet your tune/"wisdom" of what you wrote...changes. You're barely wet.

I have had every one of my Academy Students that went on, THANK me for preparing them so well, because the horse and buggy way that they were faced with in college, would have frustrated them to no end. Good thing for them, they already knew it and could spot the folly in such a clunky educational approach.

A teacher can't give you a bad technique - only you can - time, consistency and how you commit to your own development. Less X-Box, more metronome.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 15, 2011,
#8
I am going to major in music and i noticed that to get into the musical program that it says i have to do an audition and play a piece using modes. Now, excuse me if i'm wrong, but isnt the whole point of going to college and majoring and music to LEARN that stuff?! do i really have to play modes just to get in? I know all the modes and how they are made up and stuff, but im not good enough yet to be able to play somthing in a certain mode and know it.
#9
Quote by ThrashKing
I am going to major in music and i noticed that to get into the musical program that it says i have to do an audition and play a piece using modes. Now, excuse me if i'm wrong, but isnt the whole point of going to college and majoring and music to LEARN that stuff?! do i really have to play modes just to get in? I know all the modes and how they are made up and stuff, but im not good enough yet to be able to play somthing in a certain mode and know it.



You're looking to apply to a uni? All you have to do is play a couple of songs, do a couple of scale runs in whatever they tell you, play X progression. That's how it is at mine. It's not as bad as you seem to think
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#10
I am going to major in music and i noticed that to get into the musical program that it says i have to do an audition and play a piece using modes. Now, excuse me if i'm wrong, but isnt the whole point of going to college and majoring and music to LEARN that stuff?! do i really have to play modes just to get in? I know all the modes and how they are made up and stuff, but im not good enough yet to be able to play somthing in a certain mode and know it.


yes, but the program your entering is designed to turn out professional performers and has rigorous performance requirements throughout the program. they do not want to accept someone who they don't think has a reasonable chance (with a lot of hard work and a good education) of obtaining a professional level of chops on their instrument, or worse, not be able to prepare adequatly for their performance exams.
oh, and to everyone who always says "GET A TEACHER FIRST" bs. you dont need to. unless you plan on trying straight to get into a prestigious school or conservatory. if you end up getting a teacher who isnt serious, your going to develop bad technique and it would take longer to retrain you than it would to do it in the first place. so thats not necessary. it might help a lot if you had a good one, but not necessary at all. Im getting my first classical lessons here, and its not going badly at all yet, and my teacher sees no problem or incapability to follow so far, so thats just my 2cents on it.


getting a teacher before college can only help more--and if you know good musicians, they can usually direct you to a good teacher (worse comes to worse, go to some gigs and ask the players if they teach). especially in new york state (which has the classical capitol of america and jazz capitol of the world). by the way, you say your near crane? are you going to tc3 by chance?
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Sep 15, 2011,
#12
nah ACC not really close by but we have a transfer program/partnership with them.
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#13
berklee has an online school. I always am telling myself i might do that just for fun once I finish my degree at the university i attend. i went to a big state school and majored in music (classical guitar) for awhile, then i had a kid and decided to switch to business management because it would get me graduated faster and i would have more opportunities for a reliable job. another example of kids ruining your dreams.

strange enough my only means of money right now is teaching guitar lessons lol.
Blues, classical, metal. Who says you cant love all 3?