#2
Quote by jkielq91
Hi,

Could some one explain to me what Comping and Vamping means?


And please no sarcastic google it comments, as I did and was still a bit unsure.


Though its probable simple really.


Vamping is when you stay on one chord or note for a long period of time (many bars). For example, if an instrumentalist was to play say an Fsharp7 chord for 8 bars, then they would be said to be vamping an Fsharp7 chord.

Comping is the chords, rhythm and countermelodies that the rhythm section use to accompany some other instruments solos. In it's most basic, it is just root position chords played whilst someone is taking a solo.
#4
Quote by jkielq91
Hi,

Could some one explain to me what Comping and Vamping means?


And please no sarcastic google it comments, as I did and was still a bit unsure.


Though its probable simple really.


Essentially, comping is shorthand for "accompaniment" where you are playing rhythms for someone else that is soloing, usually, i.e. you are the chord guy and they are improvising or playing a solo, or maybe singing, "Comping" as a term is usually found in the Jazz idiom, and it has an art form in and of itself, implying some style and movement, for example instead of Fm7 the Comp guy might play Fm7 to Fm6 as an embellishment, he may play a different inversion each time up the neck. I go through all that to say this, that Comping MAY include more than playing the chords of a song over and over - that's oversimplification, and so it should be understood that usually, there's some nuance and reharmonization perhaps that is taking place with the "big" picture of the tune in mind.

To a smaller degree, some blues player refer to their accompaniment as "Comping", but that term really finds its home in Jazz, as it tends to be far from static. By static I mean the same chords played the same way each pass through the section. Jazz guys can play alllll sorts of ways from basic to crazily "out there", whereas Blues "comping", may tend to be much more predictable and similar.

A vamp is not the same thing - a vamp is usually a short progression, repeated back and forth. For Example F to G and repeating that. Usually in a Vamp you see 2-3 chords. Am G to F and back to Am G F would be a vamp for example. Many times its created for the purpose of an extended improvisation, or exploration of a Modal idea, where the tonal Center remains felt or easier understood, throughout, for example Em to Fmaj7.

Unless you are getting into jazz, my question is, why do you want to know what Comping is? Are you compiling a series of abstract, unrelated knowledge bits, or do you have some tangible idea of what your going to do with it?

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 15, 2011,
#5
Quote by Sean0913
Essentially, comping is shorthand for "accompaniment" where you are playing rhythms for someone else that is soloing, usually, i.e. you are the chord guy and they are improvising or playing a solo, or maybe singing, "Comping" as a term is usually found in the Jazz idiom, and it has an art form in and of itself, implying some style and movement, for example instead of Fm7 the Comp guy might play Fm7 to Fm6 as an embellishment, he may play a different inversion each time up the neck. I go through all that to say this, that Comping MAY include more than playing the chords of a song over and over - that's oversimplification, and so it should be understood that usually, there's some nuance and reharmonization perhaps that is taking place with the "big" picture of the tune in mind.

To a smaller degree, some blues player refer to their accompaniment as "Comping", but that term really finds its home in Jazz, as it tends to be far from static. By static I mean the same chords played the same way each pass through the section. Jazz guys can play alllll sorts of ways from basic to crazily "out there", whereas Blues "comping", may tend to be much more predictable and similar.

A vamp is not the same thing - a vamp is usually a short progression, repeated back and forth. For Example F to G and repeating that. Usually in a Vamp you see 2-3 chords. Am G to F and back to Am G F would be a vamp for example. Many times its created for the purpose of an extended improvisation, or exploration of a Modal idea, where the tonal Center remains felt or easier understood, throughout, for example Em to Fmaj7.

Unless you are getting into jazz, my question is, why do you want to know what Comping is? Are you compiling a series of abstract, unrelated knowledge bits, or do you have some tangible idea of what your going to do with it?

Best,

Sean


I am about to begin studying Jazz at college (not on a jazz degree, its at the final term of a one year guitar course, so basics and standards), the words are coming up more and more and I had to fix my understanding.

I actually thought a vamp just stayed on one chord, so its a good job I asked.


Thanks for the great reply.