#1
Hi all,
I'm a noob at recording. I have a lite version of Pro-Tools and I can use the basics of it (i.e recording...yeah, that's it...)
I really want to learn how to record, mix and master my songs, but I don't know where to start and there seems to be sooooooo much to learn, I'm just lost.

So, my question is:
Are there any books or dvds that could teach me, step-by-step, the core of recording?
Thanx
Schecter Hellraiser C-7
Ibanez VBT700
Ibanez SZ320
Yamaha Pacifica 112
Crafter D8/N
Peavey Transtube Bandit 112
Peavey Grind Bass 5 BXP NTB
Dunlop Dimebag Crybaby
#2
Quote by /-Vince-\
Hi all,
I'm a noob at recording. I have a lite version of Pro-Tools and I can use the basics of it (i.e recording...yeah, that's it...)
I really want to learn how to record, mix and master my songs, but I don't know where to start and there seems to be sooooooo much to learn, I'm just lost.

So, my question is:
Are there any books or dvds that could teach me, step-by-step, the core of recording?
Thanx

Im in the same boat as you.
But I'm learning a lot from Youtube vids... just do a quick search and youll know what I mean...

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
#3
Quote by MrArarat
Im in the same boat as you.
But I'm learning a lot from Youtube vids... just do a quick search and youll know what I mean...

Yeah, I've been searching a lot on this, but there always seems to be specific things I dont get on each video...Sometimes I get most of it...sometimes no clue at all...
Schecter Hellraiser C-7
Ibanez VBT700
Ibanez SZ320
Yamaha Pacifica 112
Crafter D8/N
Peavey Transtube Bandit 112
Peavey Grind Bass 5 BXP NTB
Dunlop Dimebag Crybaby
#4
Quote by /-Vince-\
Yeah, I've been searching a lot on this, but there always seems to be specific things I dont get on each video...Sometimes I get most of it...sometimes no clue at all...

I don't know much about this, but what I heard is that ProTools isnt for the starter...
Maybe you should change to a more easier software, like Cubase seems to be.
Here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vj16FcI2cBM&list=PL8D630FC4A53DCF8C&index=1

Take a look to that... its so simple...

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
#5
http://books.google.com/books/about/The_mixing_engineer_s_handbook.html?id=fTq2QgAACAAJ
I hope this will help! I did not read those book, I learnt mixing at school so I don't know if those are any good.
#6
Quote by MrArarat
I don't know much about this, but what I heard is that ProTools isnt for the starter...
Maybe you should change to a more easier software, like Cubase seems to be.
Here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vj16FcI2cBM&list=PL8D630FC4A53DCF8C&index=1

Take a look to that... its so simple...


Yeah, maybe I didnt express myself correctly, but what I meant is directed towards probably some more advanced stuff as I already know evertyhing shown in that video. I mean, I can record multiple tracks and that's no problem for me. The real problem I'm having is more on the editing and mastering part, plugins etc.
Schecter Hellraiser C-7
Ibanez VBT700
Ibanez SZ320
Yamaha Pacifica 112
Crafter D8/N
Peavey Transtube Bandit 112
Peavey Grind Bass 5 BXP NTB
Dunlop Dimebag Crybaby
#7
...also, while at it, I'm currently looking for a good sound card for recording. Any suggestions?
Schecter Hellraiser C-7
Ibanez VBT700
Ibanez SZ320
Yamaha Pacifica 112
Crafter D8/N
Peavey Transtube Bandit 112
Peavey Grind Bass 5 BXP NTB
Dunlop Dimebag Crybaby
#8
Focusrite SAPPHIRE
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
#9
Start by learning about, microphones types, microphone placement, what all the different hardware / software processing effects do, what their controls are, how to set gain levels before recording, what the difference is between mixing & mastering bla bla bla...

Recording, mixing, and mastering are 3 different art forms and you can't learn them all in a day. My advice would be to start learning how to record before you mix. Otherwise if you learn how to record badly, your mix's wont sound much better. You can't polish a turd.

+ if you're new to mixing let me tell you it'll take months, maybe years before your ears actually tune in to what's happening. Right now you'll just think louder = better and you won't hear how attack, release, ratio works on compression fully. Or what are good / bad frequencies for each instrument.

My top tip would be to start mixing at LOW levels, you'll hear everything better if you're not in a room with good acoustics. The louder you mix the more of the rooms inherent flaws will pollute the room thus making you hear things that are present in the original source forcing you to make bad choices. It takes lots of practice before you hear the flaws in your monitoring environment and know how to approach these problems during your mix.
Last edited by MrTinkle at Sep 15, 2011,
#10
Quote by MrTinkle
Start by learning about, microphones types, microphone placement, what all the different hardware / software processing effects do, what their controls are, how to set gain levels before recording, what the difference is between mixing & mastering bla bla bla...

Recording, mixing, and mastering are 3 different art forms and you can't learn them all in a day. My advice would be to start learning how to record before you mix. Otherwise if you learn how to record badly, your mix's wont sound much better. You can't polish a turd.

+ if you're new to mixing let me tell you it'll take months, maybe years before your ears actually tune in to what's happening. Right now you'll just think louder = better and you won't hear how attack, release, ratio works on compression fully. Or what are good / bad frequencies for each instrument.

My top tip would be to start mixing at LOW levels, you'll hear everything better if you're not in a room with good acoustics. The louder you mix the more of the rooms inherent flaws will pollute the room thus making you hear things that are present in the original source forcing you to make bad choices. It takes lots of practice before you hear the flaws in your monitoring environment and know how to approach these problems during your mix.

It would be better to treat the room, or use headphones for the EQ before getting the levels right through speakers, because mixing at low levels messes with your perception of the low end in relation to the rest of the mix - and many speakers also perform poorly and not-very-flat when turned down too low, as they can't move the sufficient air for the low end to be audible.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#11
Quote by DisarmGoliath
It would be better to treat the room, or use headphones for the EQ before getting the levels right through speakers, because mixing at low levels messes with your perception of the low end in relation to the rest of the mix - and many speakers also perform poorly and not-very-flat when turned down too low, as they can't move the sufficient air for the low end to be audible.


Very true but I'm thinking from a very low budget angle.
Regards
#12
The type of tutorials you will be finding are either general tutorials for basic features / tips or tutorials focusing solely on a specific advanced technique. If you think you have the basics down, try to narrow your search based on what YOU want to specifically get better at. A good start would be learning how to properly EQ tracks or get the kick drum to not clash with the bass. After that, maybe try to learn more about properly adding reverb to a mix.