#1
I've started singing my own stuff, however, when I start playing and singing I can't really hear myself well (I usually just play with the amp turned off so I can hear myself).

The quiet notes only really apply to high notes (I've been working on relying less on falsetto), is it normal for some singers to have this? or are most singers supposed to be able to fill up the Albert Hall with just their voice?

Is it possibly a confidence issue? I've been told I have a good voice, but when I hear it on its own I feel very self-conscious and that in-turn causes me to screw up a little.
#2
An acoustic guitar can sometimes be pretty loud. But that should've be a big problem as long as its not amplified.
A powerful voice is something gained through practice and vocal experience. So if you're a beginner and never have had a job where you're used to using your voice, it might lack this power.
And yes, confidence could also be an issue. Never hold your voice back, it will only strain your vocal chords more. I know it can be a struggle overcoming the fear of ones own voice, but don't hold back your voice.
#3
Projection is a byproduct of either brute force or good technique.

Consider a golfer....

Golfer 1 has no technique. He beats the living daylights out of the ball and cranks it, oh, about 100 yards.

Golfer 2 merely has more power, but still no technique. He, too, beats the f**k out of the ball and cranks it almost 200 yards.

Golfer 3 has excellent technique. He casually approaches the ball, hardly swings the club with any apparent effort at all, and the ball sails off 300 yards into the distance.

Which golfer do you want to be?

A singer with good technique should be able to fill a small theater with his voice without amplification.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Quote by Crazyedd123
I've started singing my own stuff, however, when I start playing and singing I can't really hear myself well (I usually just play with the amp turned off so I can hear myself).

The quiet notes only really apply to high notes (I've been working on relying less on falsetto), is it normal for some singers to have this? or are most singers supposed to be able to fill up the Albert Hall with just their voice?

Is it possibly a confidence issue? I've been told I have a good voice, but when I hear it on its own I feel very self-conscious and that in-turn causes me to screw up a little.
Lack of confidence and conviction in the note you're singing can certainly lead to off pitch and "swallowed" notes. It is unfortunate that the less confident you are, often leads to a poorer performance. The natural tendency that most of us share, (other than susceptibility to stage fright), is the more unsure we are, the more we suppress our singing volume.

However, every vocalist on the planet relies on quite a bit of reverb to fill out their vocals. It's like taking a stone church interior, or your shower to sing in with you while you perform.

Most people have chosen a guitar that, to them, sounds very well. The larger truth is, no matter how good the singer or the guitar, room acoustics can make, (or most often), break you.

If we're dealing with small audience acoustic performance, you might check out something like Peavey's "Ecoustic 208" amp: http://www.zzounds.com/item--PEVECOU208


This has a separate channel, usable for vocals, (2 clean channels) with reverb and delay. This could be just the thing to place at ear level to use as low level sound reinforcement and monitor all in one. This also would allow you to bring the natural level of your vocals and the guitar into balance easily.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 18, 2011,
#5
^ The notion that a singer "needs" something extra added to their voice, I find bothersome. A great singer will sound great, regardless of the room, or the quality of the microphone or whatever.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Quote by axemanchris
^ The notion that a singer "needs" something extra added to their voice, I find bothersome. A great singer will sound great, regardless of the room, or the quality of the microphone or whatever.

CT
And that's why practically every recording ever made has either delay or reverb in the vocals, and all modern concert venues involving musical performance have intensive design work regarding their acoustics before a single shovel full of soil is moved.

A great singer will sound better than a not so great singer in the same environment, period.

A great singer can made to sound "greater" through electronics and venue acoustics. Most "great singers" take advantage of these options.

I used to get the biggest kick out of watching beach movie/ musicals. It's was always such a trip hearing the echo chamber as everybody broke into song, standing in front of the ocean on a wide open expanse of beach.

Besides, the OP has already copped to the fact that he may not be a "great singer". So what's your point?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 19, 2011,
#7
Lack of confidence and conviction in the note you're singing can certainly lead to off pitch and "swallowed" notes. It is unfortunate that the less confident you are, often leads to a poorer performance. The natural tendency that most of us share, (other than susceptibility to stage fright), is the more unsure we are, the more we suppress our singing volume.


That's really true. I suffer this in my lessons with my teacher. I'm so freaking afraid of not hitting the note correctly, I stare at her and the piano key and lose all power in my voice. It really annoys her (she knows I can do better).

So on that one I just gotta say try not to be scared. You can't really practice on your voice when you're not putting 100% into what you're doing. I know I'm one to talk (it's something I need to work on as well)... but it is the truth.
#8
Thanks for the replies, I'm definitely not a pro singer, but I compose my own music and most of the time I feel like adding some vocals to the songs.

Apparently Thom Yorke had issues with his voice, during Radiohead's early years, he would ask the engineer to turn down his voice in his own monitor so he didn't have to hear it!

OT: However, I've recently been singing with just my vocals, this is so I can 'face my demons' and actually get to grips with what my voice sounds like. Although, even if my voice sounds good to me, I might think it sounds terrible when I record it. We can't always win I guess.
#9
What's my point?

Quote by Captaincranky

However, every vocalist on the planet relies on quite a bit of reverb to fill out their vocals.


My point is that, though something like reverb is often a nice enhancement to a voice, to suggest that a vocalist *relies* on reverb to fill out their vocals is entirely untrue.

A good singer will sound like a good singer - even without a stitch of reverb.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
I agree with everything that axeman has said above. The problem is projection.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
Quote by axemanchris
What's my point?


My point is that, though something like reverb is often a nice enhancement to a voice, to suggest that a vocalist *relies* on reverb to fill out their vocals is entirely untrue.

A good singer will sound like a good singer - even without a stitch of reverb.

CT
Yes, that's true. We're probably on the same note, just a slightly different pitch as it were.

A vocal with reverb will be fuller than one without. To try to compete in a commercial environment without adopting the tactics of one's peers would IMO, be a bit self defeating.

Not everybody has the projection of a trained opera singer, and there is such a class of vocalist termed a "lyric soprano".

I don't think it's harmful to suggest reverb and amplification for someone. As to whether that would be a "crutch" or a "tool", becomes a "you say tomato, I say tomahto" sort of paradigm.

I agree wholeheartedly that a bad singer will just be worse turned up. But, a decent singer with a softer voice could benefit from some electronic help, if only for the ability to better monitor him or herself.
#12
Okay. Fair enough then. 8)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.