#1
Hi guys, can you say some chords so I can test myself?

I have studied the basic chords, 7th chords and 9th chords, including 7b5 and m7b9's, and I have done the basic sus2 and sus4's.

I used the cage system.

So could you please build me a test basically by saying the chord and which caged system voicing to play it in, for example:

Bm7b5 C shape.

Or if you like:

Play 2 voicings of Cm7b9 with the root on the fifth string.

Or any other way you fancy really, but don't make it a contest about how can make the fanciest worded question.


Basically, you say the name of the chord, and then I will play it to make sure I have it down in the fingers and memory.

Obviously you wont be able to see if I am right, but I will know.

Please just stick to the chord types I mentioned above.


Thanks in advanced.
#4
Quote by conor-figgy
Umm, Dm7add9.


As a matter of convention, there is no Dm7add9. An add is usually used in absence of a 7th; when you have a Dm7 and "add" a 9, you have the chord D minor 9 - I am imagining that you are just trying to come up with a safe chord that sounded exotic enough, and that's well and good, but there's a brief little mini-theory lesson.

In a minor 7 chord, the 7 is actually a b7 - but it possibly could have been a Dmin/maj7 as well.

D F A C E - Dmin9

Best,

Sean
#8
Quote by Sean0913
G7+5 (one of my favorites from my funk playing days)

Best,

Sean

... to add, TS, play it "stylistically". So don't stick the root on at the 3rd fret E string.... or 10th fret A string... the bass player will be taking care of that stuff. Think in a "band" setting.

Top 3 strings, vital chord tones, think timbre.
#10
id advice you to learn all the notes in each chord you play (if you havent already) and not think about chord shapes, but about which note is in which voice in your chord (for example a CMAJ7 with a B in the bass is easily played B-G-C-E, with the B starting on the 6th string).
chord names:
C major
G7#9b5
D7b5
CM7#11
Gb7b9
F# fully diminished 7
Db min7b5/Eb
A7/Bb
Cmadd11
BbMaj7
Eb7b13
G7sus
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Sep 16, 2011,
#11
Quote by tehREALcaptain
id advice you to learn all the notes in each chord you play (if you havent already) and not think about chord shapes, but about which note is in which voice in your chord (for example a CMAJ7 with a B in the bass is easily played B-G-C-E, with the B starting on the 6th string).


Already on it. But I think its good to know both.
#12
Already on it. But I think its good to know both.

cool. i agree that knowing both can't hurt, but really, if you know how to describe a concept to non-guitarists (for example "root position" over "c shape") you really don't need to worry about shapes--as you can think about it in a way that actually tells you what it is, not just how to play it on your fretboard.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#13
Quote by tehREALcaptain
cool. i agree that knowing both can't hurt, but really, if you know how to describe a concept to non-guitarists (for example "root position" over "c shape") you really don't need to worry about shapes--as you can think about it in a way that actually tells you what it is, not just how to play it on your fretboard.


Well this whole thread is actually for me to prepare for an exam at music school where I will be asked to play chords. We get given shapes to learn (and obviously study what you are saying to).
#15
Quote by hawk_kst
G minor + A major.

If you can play them both at the same time, you will have become the Yoda of theory.

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lol
#16
Quote by TMVATDI
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lol

Right then.... G7 and E major triad at the same time.... or G13b9.

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