#1
Hey guys, I have some questions, again lol.

I found that Adobe audition is easier to use than Cubase or Sonar, so I'm sticking with this one...
My question is about recording the guitar.

I have an amp, and i use pedals.

I believe there are 2 ways of recording my guitar:

1) Use my At2020 mic, put it close to the amp, play as usual and record what goes trough the mic.
2) Using the Line Output Jack of my Amp, connecting it to the Guitar Jack, and recording trough the Tascam.

Which are the Pro's and Con's of each of those methods?

Thanks!!

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
#2
Recording through line you will not get the sound of the speakers, which actually is a big factor in the sound of your amp. But the real pro with this method is that you won't get unwanted background noise, such as footsteps and stuff like that.

By using the mic you will get the sound of your speakers, not just the amp as with the line. Unfortunately, every mic also sounds different so the mic itself will change the sound a bit.

So both techniques have pro's and con's, that's why I'd say test them both and see which way you prefer. Someone else might use the other technique, but there is no such thing as right or wrong.
#3
i would record whitout an amp , yust efect or on tje amps output jack ,
it hass less hiss and disturbances but you nead to make a bigger
echo or use amp modulations or it will sound dry

i use audition too , it's awsome

tryed the mic way to , you get really good soung , yust too much hum and
you nead reallyquiet room
#4
Mmm I see.... I guess I should try to test both ways and see what I find the most suitable for what I need...
Thanks!

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
#5
I'm gonna go ahead and debunk the myths (some of which are posted here).

You don't need a quiet room - you're playing through an amp, so just turn it up and you don't have to worry about the background noise unless you're bad at editing out the quiet parts/are a major-level producer, in which case you wouldn't be asking.

You shouldn't rely on playing through effects pedals - unless it's a very specific effect (digitech whammy, cutom effect, etc.) you can recreate it in the digital domain with plug-ins that will most likely sound better than your pedals (unless they're pro-level gear, which most people with low budgets here do not have... I'm talking MXR Phase-90, Tubescreamer, original Crybaby/Vox wah etc.) and recording 'clean' signals will allow you to adjust the level of the effect to better-suit the mix when you have everything else recorded.

Either way, to get a good sound will take you a lot of practise - if you choose to use amp sims (the 'easier' route, for a low budget hobbyist) you will still have to learn how to use them properly, and to get a good sound from them. Nothing good comes without practise in audio engineering.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#6
Hey man, you are saying that I should record my guitar clean, and then add the distortion effect via software?
Which software should I use to do so with Adobe Audition?
Can I apply the effect once I recorded the track?

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
#7
Quote by MrArarat
Hey man, you are saying that I should record my guitar clean, and then add the distortion effect via software?
Which software should I use to do so with Adobe Audition?
Can I apply the effect once I recorded the track?

Not quite, when I said clean I meant clean from effects, i.e no chorus/phaser/flanger/delay/reverb/etc. Distortion is used as less of an effect and more the basis of a tone these days, so I'd use distortion but not anything else. If you are using your effects unit for distortion (and by that I presume you have a multi-effects unit) then really you should still be taking the signal from the amp and not the pedal - the pedal-only signal will require you to simulate the speakers in your DAW to make it sound remotely nice.

Basically, if you have cheap equipment then unfortunately it will be hard to get a good sound using it - in that case, an amp sim may be better because you don't have to rely on your equipment (except for the guitar) to get your tone.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#8
Sorry, I'm having trouble understanding you.
I have several Boss pedals, an amp, and a guitar.
What you are saying is that I dont use the pedals, that I plug my guitar to my amp, and from my amp output jack plug it to the interface and then with some software use the sound from my guitar and apply effects like chorus, reverbs n stuff from the software?
if so, which soft do you suggest I should get? That POD one or Guitar rig one?

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
#9
Just in case, here is my gear:

Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Acoustic Guitar
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DD7
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
High End Computer (Audacity & CUBASE LE)
Netbook

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
#10
Yeah, close enough - I'm just saying that (ignoring anything that gives you your distortion sound) you should not use pedals, and should go straight into your amp. Then you take a line-level output from your amp (not your speaker output unless your amp is very small, which it could work with) and plug that into your interface's instrument input (or a line-input if your interface has one). Then apply effects in your DAW. I'll let someone else suggest them, as I rarely need to do it outside of plug-ins Logic has (and Logic is Mac-only).
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#12
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Yeah, close enough - I'm just saying that (ignoring anything that gives you your distortion sound) you should not use pedals, and should go straight into your amp. Then you take a line-level output from your amp (not your speaker output unless your amp is very small, which it could work with) and plug that into your interface's instrument input (or a line-input if your interface has one). Then apply effects in your DAW. I'll let someone else suggest them, as I rarely need to do it outside of plug-ins Logic has (and Logic is Mac-only).

Great! I understand you now! Thanks for all the help you gave me!
I think I will try Guitar Rig, as I saw on youtube that most people use that with Adobe Audition and get good results...

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic
#13
Quote by CrossBack7
Depends on what effects you want. Most DAWs have at least basic ones for each built in that you can tinker with. I have a bunch of Wave ones that were expensive as hell but sound great.

I'll check what I have with Audition, but i will surely end up getting Guitar Rig... what do you think about guitar rig?
Thanks for the reply.

My songs
My Band songs

Gear:
Vox PathFinder R15
Epiphone G-400
Accord Strato
Acoustic Guitar
POD HD 300
Boss MT2
Boss CH1
Boss DS1
Tascam US-122 MKII
AT 2020 mic