#1
Hi friends, I have found a cheap Les Paul copy in my locality which I really liked after playing it for half an hour. The guitar is quite new and in good condition, but there seems to be a little problem. When I try to full bend the notes of 15th fret using 2nd, 3rd or 4th string, the string touches the 16thy fret, as a result the sound becomes mute. it only happens in 15th fret, rest are alright. Is this thing repairable? How can I do it myself? Will raising the bridge solve this, or do I need to do anything else?

The guitar has a tune-o-matic bridge with stopbar. thanks.
My Guitar Rig:

> '09 Ibanez RG1570 Mirage Blue w/ DiMarzio John Petrucci Set
> ESP LTD V-50 Black
> Line 6 POD X3 Live
> Dunlop DB-01 Crybaby From Hell
#2
You'll need to either sand the fret level with the rest or have a tech do it for you. If only that fret has a problem this might be a relatively inexpensive repair. Buying the materials to do it yourself with probably be at least $100. Paying someone else to do it will run you between $75 and $200 depending on how many frets actually need to work fix the problem and how much they charge to set the guitar up again after.

If the guitar is already in a store tell them that you'll buy it if they will fix the bad fret first. Given the terrible market for used guitars in the USA right now, they'll probably do it.
#3
sand the frets? I think I can do this. but what if I slightly raise the action/bridge?
My Guitar Rig:

> '09 Ibanez RG1570 Mirage Blue w/ DiMarzio John Petrucci Set
> ESP LTD V-50 Black
> Line 6 POD X3 Live
> Dunlop DB-01 Crybaby From Hell
#4
Raising the action will fix it and if you don't mind the higher action then go for it. But even if you wanted high action anyway you should still have your frets levelled. You can't really just sand a fret down, that'll only make it rougher and to make any real difference you'll spend ages doing it and wear through a lot of sandpaper. Those frets are solid, hard metal. Having the frets properly levelled and crowned is the best plan but that will cost you, you'll need to take the guitar to a proper guitar tech to get it done.
#5
I'm assuming that your looking to purchase this from a retail store, if so the store should really take care of the problem before they sell it.

If it was me I would buy as is only if the seller knocks the cost of the repair, time and trouble off the price, walk away if they wont deal, no matter how much you like the guitar, there are always plenty of nice guitars out there.

Leveling a single fret is very simple, there are vidio examples on the net on how to do it.

Before anything check to make sure the high fret is seated all the way in, using a piece of wood like the end cut of a 2x4, place it over the fret and using a plastic tipped hamer give the wood 3 or 4 firm hits, if you only have a heavy carpenters stlye hammer then use lighter hits. Using a short straight edge (so it only spans three frets with the offending fret being in the middle) check to see if it worked, if not than go to plan two.

Take a small block of wood about the same size you were using but flat with no dents and using 220 - 208 sandpaper, carefully start removing the high spot on the fret, frequently checking with the straightedge.

Despite what someone else claimed here, sandpaper can be used to level frets, many luthiers and techs use it and it doesn't leave file marks.