#1
For example, in a song with E Minor, D Major, and C Major.. is it better to play in E Minor and assorted scales like E Harmonic Minor throughout the whole song, never switching the key of your scale..
Or to play E Minor and assorted scales (Harmonic Minor etc) when the E Minor chord is heard, but then when the song switches over to D Major, play in the D Major Scale or any other scale that sounds good over a major chord, and when it switches to C Major, play the C Major Scale?

What sounds better? Which do most of the good guitarists do?
Last edited by robbit10 at Sep 17, 2011,
#3
I think switching scale for every chord would sound schizophrenic, and probably very modal depending on what notes you chose to focus on.

If it were me, I'd generally just stick with whatever the key of the piece was, but by all means experiment. To be honest, you're probably going to be the only one who notices. I'm a bassist, I feel your pain.
#5
Quote by robbit10
For example, in a song with E Minor, D Major, and C Major.. is it better to play in E Minor and assorted scales like E Harmonic Minor throughout the whole song, never switching the key of your scale..
Or to play E Minor and assorted scales (Harmonic Minor etc) when the E Minor chord is heard, but then when the song switches over to D Major, play in the D Major Scale or any other scale that sounds good over a major chord, and when it switches to C Major, play the C Major Scale?

What sounds better? Which do most of the good guitarists do?

Assuming you don't know for sure what key the piece is in, the best thing to do is work out what notes work with all the chords being used. In this case, with E minor (E-G-B), D major (D-F#-A), and C major (C-E-G) we have the notes E-F#-G-B-C-D. If we fill in the remaining notes using relative major/minor chords we get E-F#-G-A-B-C-D. This is the E minor scale, so we can assume that the piece is in the key of E minor, and therefore it will be best to play E minor for as long as the piece can be assumed to be in E minor. If the chords change, the process to determine the probable key can be repeated, and if it's different then you would switch to it at that point.

Quote by Animal_Farm
well in jazz they change up to 20 scales and thats what jazz is

That's not necessarily true. I've played plenty of jazz that stays in one key for the piece, and has most of the soloists using one scale based on that key.
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#7
I have both heard and found that both is acceptable. do what you think fits best.
Blues, classical, metal. Who says you cant love all 3?
#8
You could use the harmonic minor scale but i think playing a sharpened 7th would clash with the d major chord. I may be wrong though.

E minor, e minor pentatonic and e blues would be your safest bet
#9
Quote by robbit10
For example, in a song with E Minor, D Major, and C Major.. is it better to play in E Minor and assorted scales like E Harmonic Minor throughout the whole song, never switching the key of your scale..
Or to play E Minor and assorted scales (Harmonic Minor etc) when the E Minor chord is heard, but then when the song switches over to D Major, play in the D Major Scale or any other scale that sounds good over a major chord, and when it switches to C Major, play the C Major Scale?

What sounds better? Which do most of the good guitarists do?


Are you talking about KEYS or CHORDS? If Chords...Well all of those chords are good for Em, but my question is, why are you using Harmonic Minor? Do you know what you're even doing when you use it?

I don't see a B7 in your progression.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by Animal_Farm
well in jazz they change up to 20 scales and thats what jazz is

That's awfully wrong
#11
To sean0913, why dont you try and answers the dudes question, dont give him more questions to worry about and confuse him when he already is alittle lost, and the reason you dont see a B7 is because it is not there, he didnt put one in it and he doesnt have to, its his choice what goes in and what doesn't, If you really are a 'guitar mentor' then give the guy some help and tell him what he wants to know.
#12
Quote by gary1991
To sean0913, why dont you try and answers the dudes question, dont give him more questions to worry about and confuse him when he already is alittle lost


He could help him more if TS knew was just a little bit more clear...
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#13
Quote by gary1991
To sean0913, why dont you try and answers the dudes question, dont give him more questions to worry about and confuse him when he already is alittle lost, and the reason you dont see a B7 is because it is not there, he didnt put one in it and he doesnt have to, its his choice what goes in and what doesn't, If you really are a 'guitar mentor' then give the guy some help and tell him what he wants to know.


If TS doesn't understand the key difference between the harmonic and natural minor scales, and their functions, then there's a problem. Sean was only asking for clarification, because the harmonic minor has no reason to be played over this progression.

It should be readily known by now that music theory doesn't have quick-fixes and band-aids and most of the "big" posters here (like Sean) understand that comprehension of fundamental theory will help the TS in the long run, much more than telling him what scale to use in this specific situation. Quick fixes only limit the people who use them until they learn to think for themselves. It's kind of a "give a man a fish" scenario.

OT: learn the notes in each chord and get away from thinking in shapes. Go with your instinct and your ears with a little common sense, and think in context of the song, and it'll turn out great.
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#14
Quote by gary1991
To sean0913, why dont you try and answers the dudes question, dont give him more questions to worry about and confuse him when he already is alittle lost, and the reason you dont see a B7 is because it is not there, he didnt put one in it and he doesnt have to, its his choice what goes in and what doesn't, If you really are a 'guitar mentor' then give the guy some help and tell him what he wants to know.



Hey Gary,

Appreciate the thoughts but I am not looking to live up to anyone's expectations (including yours), of what I am or am not, or should be or should not be. I've been here long enough, people can decide on their own by now and that includes you.

I get paid to teach for a living. If you want to presume to understand, and not shoot off in ignorance, look at my Mentoring link, and come at it from an informed user's opinion; it just looks better for you, rather than holding a "clueless" sign.

Have a nice day.

Best,

Sean
#15
You can stick to the E scale, but use target notes over the other chords. So as you switch to the D chord, use a note from the D scale to finish the phrase, but carry on in E. This make what your playing sound really connected to the banking music with out sounding to thought out.