#1
Well sad to say, I've never used pedals. So can you tell me the basics. Should I just go and buy some to experiment? Also I need info. on pedalboards like, how do I keep the pedals powered, how do I set up pedals on the pedalboard etc... Lastly I've heard when you run a lot of pedals your guitars signal gets weakened and there a pedal (or box) you use to amplify the signal to its original state, can you tell me the name of that?

Thanks for your help.
#2
Yeah there are those ampliflying things, they are called buffers, you can find them online for cheap.

Well you could let us know what you listen to and play so we could rec. some pedals. some pedals might not be around you to play and try out.

I don't ahve a pedalboard, i just keep them next to each other on a slab of wood.

you can power your pedals with a daisy chain or spend a lot more to get a good power supply like the Voodoo Labs PP2 and Trex Chameleon to name a few.
#3
There are so many to choose from, just randomly buying a few pedals to experiment may not help you much.

I'd recommend getting a multi FX unit which will include most of what you need to play around with, then you can decide in the future if you want to stick with that or move on and purchase individual pedals once you've determined exactly what you're after.

I use a Boss ME50 which serves me well as it acts as 3 separate effects pedals plus an expression pedal. It also has patches which are pre-programmed groups of effects, however I never use these so can't comment on them.

I'd definitely recommend the ME50, they can be purchased fairly cheaply off ebay these days. The Digitech RP335 is another one which is worth investigating.
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#5
Quote by GaryBillington
There are so many to choose from, just randomly buying a few pedals to experiment may not help you much.

I'd recommend getting a multi FX unit which will include most of what you need to play around with, then you can decide in the future if you want to stick with that or move on and purchase individual pedals once you've determined exactly what you're after.

I use a Boss ME50 which serves me well as it acts as 3 separate effects pedals plus an expression pedal. It also has patches which are pre-programmed groups of effects, however I never use these so can't comment on them.

I'd definitely recommend the ME50, they can be purchased fairly cheaply off ebay these days. The Digitech RP335 is another one which is worth investigating.

Digitech rp355 +1.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#6
well there are multi effects and individual units. generally mutil effectsthe best bang for your money, but sometimes dont offer the best tone or cant be customized. for example a boss unit is all BOSS. other individual units you cna have however many brands you want.

if your muti effect breaks our done. if 1 pedal breaks, well, just take it off your board.

pedals are powered b 9 volt, cheap systems like a 1 spot which are perfectly fine, or more professional systems like the DC brick which offer the best protection against surges and the "cleanest power". most people i know use a 1 spot for 4 bucks and its just dandy.

cheap pedals can "suck" tone by having poor components. good hand made medals keep the tone completely intact. Some pedals are true bypass meaning when off there is no interferance. the tone goes straight through. in a long signal chain, this can cause frequency loss.

Some pedals use buffers that try to electronically keep the signal in tact as well as keep the signal boosted well through the signal chain. bad buffers color tone, good ones dont.

cheapo pedals like behringer arent made well. good ones are made to last years or even decades and give studio quality sound - thats why some costs 200, 300, 400, heck even 500 dollars a pedal.

some pedals are tube driven so instead of digitally reproduced distortion, it is actually natural tube distortion.

to account for LONG cables (do effect signal loss), or crazy complicated setups, peole can put a clean boost in thier setup. and pedal with a buffer and a level control as the last pedal in the chain will essentially do the same thing. you just turn the level up a tad. essentially all these pedals have mini amps inside them and can boost the signal.

great pedals dont effect volume on or off. most pedals out there, well, they do. and if you run 6 of them together, all work differently. so people put level control on them so that your volume doesnt change 8 different ways every time you click pedals on. you can tweak all your pedals to be on the same volume.

its like saying, my stereo has a volume, my TV has a volume, and my computer has a volme. now, make them all play music/videos the same volume.....well you tweak all teh volumes right?

oh yeah "clean boost" just means it imposes gain but does not clip. so it just makes volume louder, but doesnt make a distortion type noise. essentially a overdrive pedals is a boost, but it makes the amplifier clip or something and gts a good overdriven sound.

i dunno, im no expert. its something like that. one is clean and one makes it dirty. electronically, i am not sure. ask an electronical engineer.
#7
Don't buy Behringer. I'm not a snob but they're made completely from plastic and feel fragile. I had a Behringer tuner and quickly bought a better one. This is the best bit of advice I can give!!