#1
hypothetically, what would i need for this?

i am horribly underinformed, and i'd like to record my band instead of paying for some guy to record us. and it might be cheaper in the long run to have a home studio.

so, what do i need?
#2
A computer, preferrably not a laptop, as it must be powerful, a good sound card. Software for recording/mixing/effects. A microphone, some VSTi= virtual instruments, for example for drums.
#3
so i dont need like any mixing table or anything like that? just mic straight into awesomecakes computer?
#4
Quote by Cheesepuff
so i dont need like any mixing table or anything like that? just mic straight into awesomecakes computer?



You don't need it, you can use it if you want to record many instruments as once, or a full band.

The computer mustn't be really that "awesome", just a decent processor and a decent soundcard, and software.


Mic SHOULD be good though.
#5
if i were you i would get a small mixing board because it would allow your entire band to play at one time, then go from the board to a interface of some type, then the interface to the computer. Some people dont like to record all members at once but i find it to be easier when your playing with someone. I would say 99% of people record 1 instrument at a time. So yea a computer (perferably desktop), recording software (Pro tools is a good choice), a small mixing board (4 or 6 channel makie or peavey would be good), some microphones (shure sm57's or sennheiser e609's work well for guitar), and finally your band and instruments. good luck, hope you can record some good stuff.

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#6
so ok, so i need a mic and a soundcard. whats a good soundcard i can get? this is a laptop btw guys.

i plan to record one at a time (because recording together is hard while also following a clicktrack), so the mixing board i guess won't be needed...

my processor is 2.10ghz is that good enough?
#8
I've got a quad-core, 4GB RAM desktop, can't remember the sound card but it's some Creative 5.1 card, i got pro tools LE with the mbox2 mini and it seems to cope, sometimes it lags a little bit, but for the most part it runs smoothly.
I'm not sure if a laptop with a single processor would be good enough, it says as long as you have a minimum of 2GB RAM it'll run, but you may have some processing issues.
#9
I recommend you buy a desktop computer(not a laptop)

Why?

Because

1) Laptop in-built sound cards aren't really good
2) You might not be able to replace your laptop sound card
3) 2.1 ghz is not good
#10
You also have a choice between using your computer (which probably wasn't designed for it therefore may not have adequate processing power & soundcard etc) or buying a purpose built multitracker.

For someone taking their first steps into recording, the multitracker can be the easiest way to start, they can do everything that the software options can and you know you don't need any special interfaces etc.

They can also be purchased reasonably cheaply off ebay etc. and resold if you decide you don't want to continue recording.

The main manufacturers to look for are Tascam, Zoom, Fostex, Yamaha, Korg and Boss.

Some also have built in drum machines so you wouldn't even need to look elsewhere for that.
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#11
@Tune my fork
dual core

@Cold Reader
my ram is 1790MB apparently

@GaryBillington
how do multitrackers work? I am the ultimate recording noob
#12
1st thing - 1790MB probably isn't enough RAM to fully utilise a software recording package, so you'll either need to upgrade our computer (as well as buying all the required interfaces) or get a multitracker.

Essentially all DAWs (Digital Audio Workstation), whether software or multitracker, work in the same way. You plug in your instrument, set the input level so you don't get any clipping (a basic description of this is distortion of the signal to be recorded), then you press record and play whatever you want.

The DAW will store this to the track you selected for it, then you repeat the process as many times as you need to for all the different parts you are recording (e.g. for a basic recording, drums, bass, guitar and vocals would use 4 tracks).

Once you're done, you set each track with an appropriate playback level, add any effects you require, then create your final mix. Obviously all the various options have their own ways of doing this, but that's essentially what happens for any of them.

You should also consider what you plan to do with the recording though. If you want to record your band just for your own use, a home recording set up would be a fun way to do this.

If you're hoping to use it as your official demo CD, you really should consider getting a pro studio to do it for you. Recording is a skill like any other, it takes time and practice to master it. Your first attempts won't be good enough to use as a way of selling your band.
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Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#13
What operating system are you running on your computer? 2GB of RAM and a Dual Core processor is just fine for home recordings on Windows XP. I'd imagine on Windows 7, it'd have a bit more trouble, because it requires a lot more RAM just to run the OS than XP does, but RAM is extremely cheap to upgrade - You can get 8GB for $50.

Also - Unless you're planning on tracking directly into your sound card (and not an interface), the sound card has nothing to do with how good your computer will be for recording, since the interface will replace it.
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#14
Thank you MatrixClaw, was just about to mention the whole soundcard thing. I honestly don't see the point in buying a soundcard.

You need an interface, probably a better computer, a DAW, mics, monitors. Are you going to be recording accoustic drums? What's your budget? What style of music are you (primarily) focussing on?
Last edited by mh.666 at Sep 17, 2011,
#15
For 1000 $ you can get a pretty good laptop fo recordinz
The symphonizer
#16
Quote by Sympho
For 1000 $ you can get a pretty good laptop fo recordinz

For $1000, he can get a top of the line laptop with a Core i7, 8GB of RAM and 1GB dedicated graphics
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#17
Then mate I really feel down now. Payed 1200 $ for a 4 GB RAM
The symphonizer
#18
Quote by Sympho
Then mate I really feel down now. Payed 1200 $ for a 4 GB RAM

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=286121&sku=H24-17063

Even has a Blu Ray drive


Hell, for $400, this is better than practically any desktop in its range:

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=1126317&sku=A180-156312
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
Last edited by MatrixClaw at Sep 17, 2011,
#19
Quote by GaryBillington

If you're hoping to use it as your official demo CD, you really should consider getting a pro studio to do it for you. Recording is a skill like any other, it takes time and practice to master it. Your first attempts won't be good enough to use as a way of selling your band.


^ Best advice so far in this thread.

See, Cheesepuff, you are falling into a trap that most of us have fallen into who take up recording. We do so with the intent or the expectation that we will be able to make a great sounding demo in our homes for not much money.



.... then reality kicks in....

First, you're going to spend (even without factoring in the cost of a computer or software) at least a couple of grand to get something that will produce decent results with live drums. Let's see....

8-input interface - $600 (a quite conservative estimate)
monitors - $600 (pretty conservative.... I'd, personally, be wary of anything less than this)
voal mic - $250 (conservative)
drum overheads - $100
3 SM57's - $450 (for guitar amps, toms, snare, etc. - not ideal, but it will get you going)

There's your two grand. You have no cables, stands, DI boxes, headphones, extra plugins, etc.

Now consider that your new "studio" is, essentially, a new "instrument." How long does it take a person to produce results that make people who aren't related to you or your friends say "hey man, that sounds really good!" ? Five, ten years, maybe?

So, in order to achieve your goal using this approach, you are looking into spending at least $2000 and spending five years learning and practicing recording. (at the expense of what??)

By comparison, you can go to a project studio for probably $200-300 a day and spend two days working with someone who has probably $5000-$10000 worth of gear and already knows how to get good results.

Amount spent = $500. Amount of time spent = 2 days.

Your call.

I'm not trying to dissuade you from pursuing recording, if your interest is, indeed, getting into recording. A person who wants to take up guitar seriously will spend a couple of grand and a few years developing his craft. A person who wants to fart around on recording for a weekend to see if it works out will not make (and should not make) that kind of investment.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

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#20
I would agree with axemanchris that in a perfect home studio those are the things you'd have, but saying that I've done some passable mixes with just a DI box, a reamp box and decent pair of studio head phones.

Start with what you can afford and work your way up.
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