#1
Just as I finished the lengthy journey or restringing my guitar and adjusting the truss rod and I discovered a cut (for lack of a better word) on one of the frets. If I bend the b string down or e string up at that fret the string sort of scratches against it and "Goes inside it" Is there any thing I can do (short of getting a new fret)? It seems like it could cause the strings to break.

#3
Quote by ethan_hanus
How deep is it?


Not very there a little resistance when the string goes over it, it doesn't get stuck inside and it isn't deeper than the b string.
#4
Quote by MegadethFan18
Not very there a little resistance when the string goes over it, it doesn't get stuck inside and it isn't deeper than the b string.


I would try and ignore it, it'll be more of a pain in the ass to get it fixed than to just get used to it probably.
#6
i think it should be fret wear? you should take it as an indication that you're playing a lot of guitar and the guitar deserves to be given a fret dress.

even if you take a sandpaper or steel wool and make it go away, that fret would be shorter than the other frets and it'll create buzz. you must lower ALL the frets to compensate lowering that one. you should have your frets leveled (lowered to equal height), crowned (given a round top to ensure small area of contact to eliminate some buzz), and polished. that's mostly a luthier job, but it's not hard with the right tools though.
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#7
Quote by ECistheBest
i think it should be fret wear? you should take it as an indication that you're playing a lot of guitar and the guitar deserves to be given a fret dress.

even if you take a sandpaper or steel wool and make it go away, that fret would be shorter than the other frets and it'll create buzz. you must lower ALL the frets to compensate lowering that one. you should have your frets leveled (lowered to equal height), crowned (given a round top to ensure small area of contact to eliminate some buzz), and polished. that's mostly a luthier job, but it's not hard with the right tools though.


Yeah I though sanding it would make it uneven although it is so tiny it may work. Pretty sure it's not fret wear I haven't been playing it much of late due to truss rod issues (although I have had the guitar 2.5 years). I think must have done something that caused the "cut" because I don't think it was there before I changed the strings.

As far as creating a buzz goes the way I set up my guitar cause loads of buzz. If the frets ain't buzzin' the actions too high for me.
#8
it is fret wear, but it is fairly isolated (usually its wider). something like that can be caused by a high fret or poor set-up which can result in constant but minor contact between the string and the fret. looking at the frets around it, it looks like it might be a high fret. it could also have been caused by hitting the string into the fret quite hard, but I think that that would be extremely unlikely (I've done it once, I crashed into a drum kit).

don't sand it down or anything like that, that would be stupid; your whole set-up would be thrown right off for good. either perform a fret-dress yourself, or pay a reputable shop to do it for you (the whole guitar will feel better anyways)
#9
EDIT: The original post here had info pertaining to how a fix a much deeper and severe cut. Oops
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Last edited by Flux'D at Sep 17, 2011,
#10
I have a fret like that on one of my RGs, it has never really given me a problem....
#11
You could try filing it so the little peak that got mashed up becomes flat with the surface...You'll still have that small valley, but the string wont have any sharp edges it would catch on...you should do this very very very very cautiously.
#13
You could just have that one fret replaced and filed down to match the others.
#14
You can polish that out without having to worry about the other frets buzzing considering the size of it.
#15
That does not look like normal fret wear to my eyes. It looks like the guitar fell face down and the strings were pushed into the fret wire.
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#16
Quote by Bhaok
That does not look like normal fret wear to my eyes. It looks like the guitar fell face down and the strings were pushed into the fret wire.


Thats what I thought at first as like I have said it wasn't there at the start of the week before I tried to change the strings, I maybe dropped something on it. I might try file it as it isn't that big/deep.