#1
Hello all,

I play guitar, bass, drums, and piano, and I'd like to learn a new instrument. I was thinking maybe sax or trumpet, as they are relatively far from what I already know.

Anyone have any advice for learning either of those, or for that matter, recommend a new instrument to play?

I have a solid understanding of theory, so I'm really only concerned about technique.

No rusty trombone please
#2
I recommend an instrument in which all intonation relies on you such as violin, cello, singing, erhu, theremin, etc.

It will improve your ear to a considerable degree which in turn helps you with all other instruments.
#3
Wind instruments are a completely different ballpark to strings, really. I wouldn't advise pursuing them if you plan on going through any contemporary music routes. I've been playing trombone for...8 years now? and trumpet/french horn for about 5, and they're really pains in the ass compared to the more streamlined instruments (esp without a private teacher).

Orchestral strings like above would do you a world of good, yeah. And you're not a real bass player if you don't have double bass calluses
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Last edited by Hail at Sep 18, 2011,
#5
I've played alto and tenor sax for about 9 years now, I found it helped the discipline to be accurate and technical with guitar, but as Hail said, it's a real pain in the ass without proper instruction
#6
Thanks for the replies. I was intentionally wanting to pursue something far away from what I know, in an effort to challenge myself.

Not too challenging though. Still want to be able to play.

For those of you who already play one of these faraway instruments: how long would you say it would take to get to a basic level of skill? By that I mean you can actually produce a desired note on command. Again, I've got a backing in theory, and I've been playing my other instruments for 10+ years.
#7
Saxophones are awesome. Do it. Do it now.
Not exactly a frequent poster.
#8
Quote by lionelhutz
For those of you who already play one of these faraway instruments: how long would you say it would take to get to a basic level of skill? By that I mean you can actually produce a desired note on command. Again, I've got a backing in theory, and I've been playing my other instruments for 10+ years.

It depends on how much you practice, and how fast you can develop the lip muscles. A year or more isn't unrealistic though, especially for the higher notes.
Ka pu te ruha ka hao te rangatahi.
#9
If you're set on wind instruments then I recommend the oboe. It sounds nice and is certainly a challenge.
#10
try the male organ


seriously
i'd advise not trumpet. the embouchure is KILLER, and if you miss one day of practice its glaringly apparent, and it can take years to get a good sound and range. Sax is supposed to be easy enough (if you work properly and practice daily) and is a beutiful instrument used in all kinds of music. if you have your mind set on brass, I'd advise trying euphonium--which is much easier then trumpet or trombone, and a lot of fun to play (particularly in a concert band), and, as long as you give it 45 minutes a day most days a pleasing sound is quite do-able, as is reasonable technique and range after a year or two.
all the best.
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#11
can i ask....why? if you want a challenge, then try to learn more challenging things. i think you'll find theres a point where learning all these instruments isnt really going to be ver productive unless you get a chance to play each on a regular basis.

i was like you, and actually got a sax, then realized i keep going back to guitar. if you are going to learn a new instrument, make sure you really want to and its going to be something you are actually going to play, not just something you happen to like.

harmonica is a good option as someone said, it can be pretty tough to get good at it. but the plus side is if you play diatonic harmonica, they are all the same layout. so you dont need to practice a whole bunch of different positions and patterns, they are the same on each harmonica. so if you know the major scale on it, just find the key you want and play and you will be in key. its good because it cuts down the amount of time you need to spend on it.
#14
Why don't you get really good at one instrument, instead of trying to dabble in all of them?
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#15
Well if music is just a hobby then there's no need to be extremely good at an instrument unless he wants to be. Maybe TC just enjoys learning new instruments.

edit: oh and TC should learn violin. Violin is my favorite instrument.
Last edited by KeineZeit at Sep 20, 2011,
#16
It's also not impossible to be really good at one instrument and pretty damn good at a couple more, contrary to popular belief.
#18
Quote by Vlasco
It's also not impossible to be really good at one instrument and pretty damn good at a couple more, contrary to popular belief.

Just to add to that, doubling is actually incredibly common at the professional level, particularly for studio musicians and orchestral players. In fact, about the only family where doubling is less likely is strings.
Ka pu te ruha ka hao te rangatahi.