#1
Dear all,
I whish I could afford a decent guitar teacher, but alas... Anyway, I use various books to teach me lead, and I must say that it is going well. With a teacher it would go a lot faster, but I am doing not too bad.

I do have one issue in particular that I would like to understand. The term "Play over a chord". I have heard it a few times. But have no idea what it it is. Can some one please:
1. Explain what is meant by this term?
2. How do I "play over a chord"?

Thank you.

Robbie Zielemans
Sasolburg, SOuth Africa
#2
A rhythm guitarist generally strums chords (a chord is 2 strings or more) then the lead guitarist plays the lead notes over the chords the rhythm guitarist strums.

Any help?
when irish eyes are smiling, you've had to too much to drink cus eyes dont smile, mouths do
#3
Thanks for your reply, but No, not really. After I did some reading, I realised that the lead playes the notes of the chord, bnut does he improvise, does he use the same chords, or is it basicaly up to lead player as long as he uses the same notes?
#4
Quote by BRJ217
Thanks for your reply, but No, not really. After I did some reading, I realised that the lead playes the notes of the chord, bnut does he improvise, does he use the same chords, or is it basicaly up to lead player as long as he uses the same notes?


What ever sounds good. From the sounds of it you're expecting a simple answer from what in reality is some quite complicated chord and key theory.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#5
The simple answer is:

1. Every song is in a key.

2. Every song has a chord progression.

3. One way of creating progression in a solo is by emphasising chord tones - finding common notes between the key/parent scale with the chord played underneath.

But I'm unsure if that'll really help you. Just start learning about keys, scales and chords and one day it'll click.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Quote by BRJ217

I do have one issue in particular that I would like to understand. The term "Play over a chord". I have heard it a few times. But have no idea what it it is. Can some one please:
1. Explain what is meant by this term?
2. How do I "play over a chord"?


It means to play while someone else or your backing track is playing a chord.

This is actually really important. The book is telling you not to play your solos/exercises/etc without accompaniment. By having chords in the background, you give your lead something to relate to.

This is how you avoid solos that are just empty technique.
#7
I think you mean playing changes, which is more of a jazz concept, but can be used in any style. In rock and blues, for example most songs will allow you to stay in one key throughout the solo section, because all the chords will be related.
In jazz, typically there are a lot more chords going by, and they might not be related, there might be key changes, etc. You're following the chords, rather than just playing just one scale, or remaining in one key. This is why jazz is so freakin' hard...which is why I play rock.

A good book that might help you is the Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine
I'd like to help, but not as much as I'd like not to.


"To be successful, you need to be a good musician. To be popular, you just need to be fashionable" - Ritchie Blackmore
#8
Quote by BRJ217
Dear all,
I whish I could afford a decent guitar teacher, but alas... Anyway, I use various books to teach me lead, and I must say that it is going well. With a teacher it would go a lot faster, but I am doing not too bad.

I do have one issue in particular that I would like to understand. The term "Play over a chord". I have heard it a few times. But have no idea what it it is. Can some one please:
1. Explain what is meant by this term?
2. How do I "play over a chord"?

Thank you.

Robbie Zielemans
Sasolburg, SOuth Africa

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1TzEeDmgeA
What he says at 1:40 to 1:44 is really important.
#10
Quote by AlanHB
"They're the most truest parts of the chords".


And he can speak most wellest.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#11
Haha, yes it would've made more sense if I included the part about 3rds and 7ths! That phrase was just stressing the importance of them.

Not sure if this is what the TS is asking about, but hopefully the vid is a benefit and something for future reference anyway.
#12
Hey everybody! i got a question!! ok ive seen and my friends tell me that when u r playing a solo (own solo) you must play the same scale that the chord like if u r playing A you must play A scale that part i understood but... i start learning modes and i get confuse in tsome things like first of all i use as backin track B A C# D because start on B means that is a A Dorian mode soo i start solooing in this mode and using some arpegios and tapping etc.. but not over the same Chords like an A arpeggio over a D chord and some tapping over other Chord that wasnt the correct chord but all around the A scale and really it sound fine to my is like sound pretty good even wasnt over the right Chord. the Question is its obligatory to play the scale or arpeggio over the same scale couse i see that my backing track is based over the A scale B(2) A(1) C#(3) D(4) in the scale. and i play A scale over all the chords and really sounds good so thats my question! please respond it i believe that is because your A scale have maybe all the notes that the Chords i play xD so thanks wating responses!
#13
Dont start learning modes unless your tonal theory is solid. Thet progression is likley not modal, most modal backing tracks will consist of only one or two chords. The key is not defined by what chord a progression starts or ends on but where it resolves to. It is likley that your preogression is tonal with an accidental or two. I havent played the progression yet so I cant judge but really listen to it and let your ears judge where the key centre is.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Sep 21, 2011,
#14
Quote by Skeiknyds
Hey everybody! i got a question!! ok ive seen and my friends tell me that when u r playing a solo (own solo) you must play the same scale that the chord like if u r playing A you must play A scale that part i understood but... i start learning modes and i get confuse in tsome things like first of all i use as backin track B A C# D because start on B means that is a A Dorian mode soo i start solooing in this mode and using some arpegios and tapping etc.. but not over the same Chords like an A arpeggio over a D chord and some tapping over other Chord that wasnt the correct chord but all around the A scale and really it sound fine to my is like sound pretty good even wasnt over the right Chord. the Question is its obligatory to play the scale or arpeggio over the same scale couse i see that my backing track is based over the A scale B(2) A(1) C#(3) D(4) in the scale. and i play A scale over all the chords and really sounds good so thats my question! please respond it i believe that is because your A scale have maybe all the notes that the Chords i play xD so thanks wating responses!

Punctuation mother****er!
#15
Quote by Skeiknyds
Hey everybody! i got a question!! ok ive seen and my friends tell me that when u r playing a solo (own solo) you must play the same scale that the chord like if u r playing A you must play A scale that part i understood but... i start learning modes and i get confuse in tsome things like first of all i use as backin track B A C# D because start on B means that is a A Dorian mode soo i start solooing in this mode and using some arpegios and tapping etc.. but not over the same Chords like an A arpeggio over a D chord and some tapping over other Chord that wasnt the correct chord but all around the A scale and really it sound fine to my is like sound pretty good even wasnt over the right Chord. the Question is its obligatory to play the scale or arpeggio over the same scale couse i see that my backing track is based over the A scale B(2) A(1) C#(3) D(4) in the scale. and i play A scale over all the chords and really sounds good so thats my question! please respond it i believe that is because your A scale have maybe all the notes that the Chords i play xD so thanks wating responses!


Wassup. Your friends are wrong. Those chords also are either major or minor. Find the key, use the scale.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#16
I think ultimately you need to do A LOT of internet research and learn from people who know what they are talking about, a lot of what you claim to know is only half true and there is a lot more too this than you seem to think there is.

For example if I was playing a simple progression of F, C, Dm and Bb then I know that those chords are in the key of F Major, so I could easily play the F Major scale over the top of it and it'd work. Then I could apply modes and all the other kinds of scales.

My knowledge of theory is very limited but I'm pretty sure this is right and is one of the most basic answers that you can get.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#17
ChemicalFire, if you played G Dorian over that progression you would still be playing F major. The chords define the key/mode, and F C Dm Bb is never going to be modal, no matter what you play over it. Perhaps you are mistaking the term modes for scale positions/shapes, which are really just different ways to play the same scale, regardless of what degree of the scale your first finger happens to play.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#18
Quote by Hydra150
ChemicalFire, if you played G Dorian over that progression you would still be playing F major. The chords define the key/mode, and F C Dm Bb is never going to be modal, no matter what you play over it. Perhaps you are mistaking the term modes for scale positions/shapes, which are really just different ways to play the same scale, regardless of what degree of the scale your first finger happens to play.


I thought that's what a mode is at a basic level? I didn't get into any detail about it cuz my knowledge is limited. xD But thank's for the info.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at Sep 21, 2011,