#1
i was just messing around with some basic chords and came up with a nice sounding chord progression. However i later found out that it is the same chord progression as in an already existing song.

But the two version sound different as there is picking in one version and guitar strumming and a different rhythm in the other one.

So does my "song" count as a copy of the other one?
#2
could you tell from listening to one that it's the same as the over? if not then no it's not stealing after all a good artist borrows, a great artist steals
#3
No, it's basically impossible to write a chord progression that hasn't been used before. As long as the other elements of the song (melody, strumming patterns, song structure, lyrics) aren't the same, then it's not a copy. Just similar.
Don't you hate it when you're reading a sentence and it doesn't end how you testicles.

Did you hear the one about the boy with the short atten
#5
Quote by TheKraken
No, it's basically impossible to write a chord progression that hasn't been used before. As long as the other elements of the song (melody, strumming patterns, song structure, lyrics) aren't the same, then it's not a copy. Just similar.

This. You can't really copyright a chord progression, so if the two songs don't really sound alike, you won't get sued.
REGGIE
#6
All right, thanks for the responses!
Makes sense, since there is only a limited number of chord progression and so many more people.
#7
Ever hear a song on the radio for the first time and another song you know pops into your head, and you can basically sing it to this song you've never heard before? That's because the chord progression is probably the same. For example, the ever classic "T Pattern" is used in just about every pop single on the radio. It's what you do with your progression that matters. Fills, lyrics, vocal patterns, lead lines, bass lines etc etc etc