#1
so ive had a strat for about a year and i noticed the other day that when i bend one string, all the other strings go out of tune, which makes it impossible to bend one string and then play a different string cause the second string is playing the wrong note. this never used to happen to me, so im just wondering why its happening all of a sudden and how to fix it cause its a pain. the only reason i can think of why it would start happening all of a sudden is that the springs holding the bridge are losing tension..is that correct? and if so, is that normal to happen after having a guitar for a year?
#2
Hey depends on how well you have been taking care of the strat..had mine for like 2 years and it's fine! Have you had your strings lowered? I would personally take it down to your local guitar techy...give it a quick chEck up...
#3
It's cuz your trem isn't blocked. It happens on any guitar with a trem system. It happens because the bride is suspended and not locked in, and moving the string changes the tension slightly on the rest of the bridge, causing the other strings to fluctuate tuning when bending. It can be fixed b blocking off the trem. That's the only real solution.
#4
Quote by Dio10101
It's cuz your trem isn't blocked. It happens on any guitar with a trem system. It happens because the bride is suspended and not locked in, and moving the string changes the tension slightly on the rest of the bridge, causing the other strings to fluctuate tuning when bending. It can be fixed b blocking off the trem. That's the only real solution.

This is the reason. There are some trem products that supposedly get rid of this effect but I'm not quite sure.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#7
i read on another forum that if i put 5 springs in it could fix it, i only have 3 in right now..is that true? if so, where can i get 2 more of those springs?
#8
Quote by pointblankpb10
i read on another forum that if i put 5 springs in it could fix it, i only have 3 in right now..is that true? if so, where can i get 2 more of those springs?


any guitar store.

5 springs will clamp the bridge flat to the body. You will likely lose the use of the whammy bar, but the guitar will stay in tube SO much better. It will also stay in tune (nearly) if you break a string (especially if you break a thinner one).
#9
There's a easy way to fix this on a Strat. All you have to do is tighten your strings in the trem rout (in back) to the point that your bridge sits flush with the body of your guitar, then tighten just a little bit more. What this will do is allow you to bend, hit other notes, and stay in tune so you can keep on pitch.

This works because the string tension is keeping the bridge in the same place, flush with the body. The downside is that you will only have the ability to bend your notes one way with the trem. I set up all of my strats like this, and I don't have tuning issues.
#10
Usually if you press the trem down, and let it come back up naturally, it'll settle the tuning and bring it back in tune.

You just got to know how to use a strat trem.

Or you can cut a wood block and stuff it in the trem to block it, or 5 springs will do(tis what I do).