#1
hi
I am about to perform live,only a few songs(guitar and singing)
my question is this; I play a GRETSCH 5120, but i'm only struming,not lead. Should i leave my AMP settings plain, or should i put some reverb or chourus, or both on.
this is a new experience for me, i've sung before ,but never played guitar and sung.
I'm fairly nervous, so any advice at all would be extremely helpful
THANKS--ROB
#2
What kinda music are you going to play? What amp are you talking about? I would probably leave the chorus alone and perhaps put on a bit reverb.
#3
little bit of reverb to thicken up your chords, but no chorus. though obviously this is just personal preference, why not use trial and error to find your sound?
#4
More importantly, make sure to set your EQ correctly, and make sure you have plenty of mids. What sounds good when playing in your bedroom won't sound the same live.
#5
Quote by Frank_Black
More importantly, make sure to set your EQ correctly, and make sure you have plenty of mids. What sounds good when playing in your bedroom won't sound the same live.

Oh yes this indeed.
#6
thanks.
i play 50's and 60's music.
and yes i should find my own sound with trial and error, but its my first time and i'm nervous.
plenty of Mids, is there an easy reason for this, be gentle with me i am a novice
thanks
#7
Quote by Jyrgen
What kinda music are you going to play? What amp are you talking about? I would probably leave the chorus alone and perhaps put on a bit reverb.


hi, i play 50's and 60's music and i use a LINE 6 iv amp
i probably should also buy a decent accoustic guitar, but i thought the Gretsh would be good for both lead and accoustic, being a hollow body. do you have any thoughts on this.
#8
Quote by Frank_Black
More importantly, make sure to set your EQ correctly, and make sure you have plenty of mids. What sounds good when playing in your bedroom won't sound the same live.


why lots of MIDS. Is there an easy explanation
#9
Quote by robbie.a
why lots of MIDS. Is there an easy explanation

Guitars are a Mid tone instrument. The mids make it cut through better.
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#10
either a little bit of reverb or nothing at all, regarding FX for '50s and '60s rhythm guitar tones.

i think often people get misled by this "plenty of midrange" thing everyone talks about here - the mids are important because they are the range of frequencies where the fundamental frequencies of most of the notes you can play on a guitar belong, so the mid control on your amp kind of control how prominent your guitar is in the mix. not enough mids and you'll be difficult to hear, too much and your guitar will over power the sound. but when you're playing rhythm, i'd recommend that you cut them back a little rather than boost them, just don't turn them down so far that nobody can hear you.

what amp are you using, actually? on most amps i use i have the mids at around 3 or 4 most of the time for my rhythm tones, but most of my amps have quite a lot of midrange already. it depends on the amp, really.
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#11
Quote by robbie.a
hi
I am about to perform live,only a few songs(guitar and singing)
my question is this; I play a GRETSCH 5120, but i'm only struming,not lead. Should i leave my AMP settings plain, or should i put some reverb or chourus, or both on.
this is a new experience for me, i've sung before ,but never played guitar and sung.
I'm fairly nervous, so any advice at all would be extremely helpful
THANKS--ROB


There are alot of unknowns here - floor or stage? Moniter? Thru a PA?


If your playing with a band then the other members will help you will your set up.

If your playing unaccompanied then go in early with a friend there to help you with a sound check plus it with alleviate some of your jitters.
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#12
Quote by robbie.a
why lots of MIDS. Is there an easy explanation


Guitars are mid-based instruments. But also, the bass takes the low frequencies as well as some of the drums, the cymbals often take the treble, high frequencies. If you want to be heard turn up those mids dude!
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#13
try without chorus or reverb first. adding too much from the start can make the sound mushy and it makes it harder to mix everything well. once you're mixed up, you can determine whether you need anything else added to thicken the sound or not.

another thing to keep in mind: the louder you play, the less bass you need on your eq (this is due to loudness contours- look them up!!). plus, if there is a bass and drums, you'll need mids and highs to cut over them, so don't add too much bass as it will, again, make things hard to mix and sloppy sounding.

otherwise, just do what sounds good. if it works in practices and jams, it'll work live. if it isn't broken, don't try to fix it or you will go wrong somewhere