#1
I need some songs that will help me practice switching chord positions quickly, to help with speed. For example, a song that switches from a so and so chord to another so and so chord relatively quickly (not to fast please). Also songs that require releasing a finger to play another note on the same chord would be great. Thanks in advance!
#2
Let me give you a tip for the future.


Whenever you want to work on something, it's always faster and easier to come up with your own exercise and play it faster.

In your case: take random 6 chords and play them at a comfortable speed, then gradually speed up.
#3
Quote by Zeletros
Let me give you a tip for the future.


Whenever you want to work on something, it's always faster and easier to come up with your own exercise and play it faster.

In your case: take random 6 chords and play them at a comfortable speed, then gradually speed up.


Thanks, will try out.
#4
ascendancy by trivium, smooth string skipping in the verses, good alternate picked rhythms in the pre chorus, pretty good practice song.
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#5
Quote by thesandman34
I need some songs that will help me practice switching chord positions quickly, to help with speed. For example, a song that switches from a so and so chord to another so and so chord relatively quickly (not to fast please). Also songs that require releasing a finger to play another note on the same chord would be great. Thanks in advance!


Wasted years by iron maide, the chorus has some fairly quick chord changes involving power chords and open chords.

Highway to hell
#6
What level are you at? What can you play at the moment?

Dont just take 6 random chords and sitch between them, find some chords that are in a key and practice them - youll be making more musical sense and youll get the feel for playing and understanding chords in a key.

Start with just using I IV V chords in as many ways and keys (if youre comfortable with barre chords) as you can think of. Then introduce the vi chord and get various ways of playing I V vi IV progressions under your fingers. Its good to be able to play these extremely common progressions in every key and position.

However, I suspect that you didnt understand all the roman numeral crap that I just threw at you, in which case you could also use your search for chord progressions as an opportunity to learn some basic theory.


Edit: But since you did ask for examples and not advice Ill offer you this - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOoicpB9HyY

I found it useful when I was trying to get better at switching chords. The entire song is just the chords E D E D A, but it builds up brilliantly in aggression and gradually gets faster.

Edit Edit: And just to elaborate on what I was saying earlier, because Im generous like that, Ill tell you a little bit about progressions.

An awful lot of music can be made up with three chords;
The I (one) chord of the key (the home chord, the one that defines the key of the song, sometimes called the tonic), the IV (four) chord of the key (can be found on the fretboard one string higher than the I chord but on the same fret, for example A is the IV chord of E, C is the IV of G), and the V (five) chord of the key (can be found one string higher than the I and two frets higher, eg B is the V of E, D is the V of G).

The roman numerals indicate which degree of the scale the chord is build off of. Eg an E major scale goes;
E F# G# A B C# D (E)
To apply a roman numeral to each;
E=I F#=ii G#=iii A=IV B=V C#=vi D#=vii (E=I)
In my understanding, when the numeral is lower case the chord built from that degree of the scale is a minor chord and if uppercase then its a major chord.
To work these chords out in any given key you need to understand the formula for constructing a major scale, know the chromatic scale and be able to form triads from a scale, all of which are rewarding to learn and you will find out more if you read the The Crusades articles in the lessons section of this website.

Anyway, I also mentioned the vi chord and the I V vi IV progression. One way of finding the vi chord, which is a minor chord, of a scale is to go two frets higher than the V chord. The usefulness of the I V vi IV progression will now be demonstrated by our friends from Australia http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pidokakU4I
E, B, C#m, A
D, A, Bm, G
A, E, F#m, D
Have Fun
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Sep 20, 2011,
#7
Quote by Hydra150
What level are you at? What can you play at the moment?

Dont just take 6 random chords and sitch between them, find some chords that are in a key and practice them - youll be making more musical sense and youll get the feel for playing and understanding chords in a key.

Start with just using I IV V chords in as many ways and keys (if youre comfortable with barre chords) as you can think of. Then introduce the vi chord and get various ways of playing I V vi IV progressions under your fingers. Its good to be able to play these extremely common progressions in every key and position.

However, I suspect that you didnt understand all the roman numeral crap that I just threw at you, in which case you could also use your search for chord progressions as an opportunity to learn some basic theory.


Edit: But since you did ask for examples and not advice Ill offer you this - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOoicpB9HyY

I found it useful when I was trying to get better at switching chords. The entire song is just the chords E D E D A, but it builds up brilliantly in aggression and gradually gets faster.

Edit Edit: And just to elaborate on what I was saying earlier, because Im generous like that, Ill tell you a little bit about progressions.

An awful lot of music can be made up with three chords;
The I (one) chord of the key (the home chord, the one that defines the key of the song, sometimes called the tonic), the IV (four) chord of the key (can be found on the fretboard one string higher than the I chord but on the same fret, for example A is the IV chord of E, C is the IV of G), and the V (five) chord of the key (can be found one string higher than the I and two frets higher, eg B is the V of E, D is the V of G).

The roman numerals indicate which degree of the scale the chord is build off of. Eg an E major scale goes;
E F# G# A B C# D (E)
To apply a roman numeral to each;
E=I F#=ii G#=iii A=IV B=V C#=vi D#=vii (E=I)
In my understanding, when the numeral is lower case the chord built from that degree of the scale is a minor chord and if uppercase then its a major chord.
To work these chords out in any given key you need to understand the formula for constructing a major scale, know the chromatic scale and be able to form triads from a scale, all of which are rewarding to learn and you will find out more if you read the The Crusades articles in the lessons section of this website.

Anyway, I also mentioned the vi chord and the I V vi IV progression. One way of finding the vi chord, which is a minor chord, of a scale is to go two frets higher than the V chord. The usefulness of the I V vi IV progression will now be demonstrated by our friends from Australia http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pidokakU4I
E, B, C#m, A
D, A, Bm, G
A, E, F#m, D
Have Fun


Thanks a lot that helped a ton.