#2
Sounds like b minor to me but i havn't got a guitar on me atm

edit: after a second listen. sounds like e minor

edit: after a third listen sounds like e major. Can definately recognise the major 3rd.
Last edited by mrbabo91 at Sep 21, 2011,
#3
When learning theory and how things sound, people generally associate major with sounding happy, and minor with sad. This song is a perfect example of how a major key can sound sad.
#4
the key is E.

The chords roughly are:

E - C#m - A - Bsus4 or B

Sometimes their is a D added in between E and C#m, and thus avoid the D# note on this when improvising.

Also sometimes the A chord is normally 4 beats long, but sometimes it's 2 beats long (half a bar) and the other half of the bar is E/G# which is an E Major chord with a G# in the bass.

I cba too fill it out step by step, cause there are so many typical little pop music conventions added throughout the song.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Sep 21, 2011,
#5
Quote by mdc
When learning theory and how things sound, people generally associate major with sounding happy, and minor with sad. This song is a perfect example of how a major key can sound sad.


yes i generally mistook it for e minor because i knew it resolved on e and it sounded sad. It wasnt until i recognised the major third interval that i realised it was e major
#6
tried figuring it out on the guitar
heres some(all) of the keys played?

a b c# e f# g#

input that into some scale finder online and it gave me like 15 different scales hmmm

doesnt emajor have 4 sharps? i dont think he played d# at all
#7
It's not about what "he" plays, it's about the tonal center of the song - where it resolves. That is E major.

At some points out-of-key chords are used. For those you employ accidentals.
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#9
Quote by AlanHB
It's not about what "he" plays, it's about the tonal center of the song - where it resolves. That is E major.

At some points out-of-key chords are used. For those you employ accidentals.



Yup Yup


Especially how the D chord is used briefly, is very common, especially in poppy punk rock and pop.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Sep 22, 2011,