#1
Folks,

Although I play Guitar, my theoretical knowledge is quite limited. Most often I see a strumming pattern described using U and D letters (for up and down strokes). For example, UD DUDP. The problem with this is that it does not capture things such as timing, effect, etc. There is a time period for the repeat pattern. There could also be a pause between two strokes. For example, UD pause UDUD. Also, sometimes some strokes need to be played with muting effect.

Is there some standard language to describe strumming patterns in more detail?

Thank you in advance for enlightening me.

Regards,
Peter
#2
Look up the written notation of the music. as well as learn how the notations of rhythm. It should be to hard to learn. If you have any questions about it you can ask here



Quote by Gunpowder
Thrashturbating? Most metal of all ways to pleasure oneself.
#3
well for timing there is nothing better then note duration. when i say note duration I am talking about whole note, half note, quarter note, eighth, sixteenth. learn the values of all the different note and how to read and play both the note and the rests is vital to learning songs. like everything it just takes practice. keep reading lessons until it just clicks.

all u need to know is how to divide by 2 and you have everything u need to start learning this.

only worry about the 4/4 time scale and then once you figure out how note duration works then move on to other time scales.

for example in a 4/4 time scale 1 whole note would fit in the bar(messure) and it would ring out for 4 beats. 2 half notes would fit. 4 quarter, ect.

http://totalguitarist.com/lessons/rhythm/intro/

check this out too ^

in my personal opinion you will learn that there is not one set way to learn or read music. every skill you sharpen, or utilize will help and make it easier and easier. There are many dimensions to learning a song. memorization capacity, reading notation, reading tabs, well trained ear, knowing note duration, the list goes on.
Blues, classical, metal. Who says you cant love all 3?
Last edited by ThatDarnDavid at Sep 21, 2011,
#4
Pretty much what these guys are saying, learn note duration. If standard notation is too hard try tab, but be aware there's no set way to write a tab so tabs will often differentiate from each other.

I really suggest learning standard notation early though, it'll help you a lot. That's the one thing I wish I learned when I started playing is standard notation.

Don't bog yourself down with theory too early though! There's a lot of it out there and there is such thing as too much. Try to keep your theoretical knowledge a little ahead of your technical skills, but not too far ahead as you'll feel like there's so many directions to go you won't know what to do with it. Get your foundations first.

For technique I suggest nothing but the basics: keep working on your picking, finger placement and dexterity. For theory I suggest learning the major scale, intervals, and concepts of rhythm. Just my two cents
I am the crack in the wall, The eye in the sky.
I am the final slumber, The great divide.
I am the silence in madness, That lies to your face,
My woe is accepted, 'tis the end of your race.
Last edited by Metal_Master_0 at Sep 21, 2011,
#5
Quote by PeterTaps

Is there some standard language to describe strumming patterns in more detail?


As others have said, standard notation handles this quite nicely.

I can't speak for others, but I never think in terms of upstrokes and downstrokes anymore. I suspect that's a tool primarily used to instruct beginners.

And when I'm talking to my bandmates, we'll talk in note durations: "three quarters then three sixteenths" etc.
#6
Quote by PeterTaps
Folks,

Although I play Guitar, my theoretical knowledge is quite limited. Most often I see a strumming pattern described using U and D letters (for up and down strokes). For example, UD DUDP. The problem with this is that it does not capture things such as timing, effect, etc. There is a time period for the repeat pattern. There could also be a pause between two strokes. For example, UD pause UDUD. Also, sometimes some strokes need to be played with muting effect.

Is there some standard language to describe strumming patterns in more detail?

Thank you in advance for enlightening me.

Regards,
Peter


Those patterns do not teach time, they teach imitation. To feel time and understand that D D U U D U - then you have to understand that it's 8th notes and there's a tie from the and of 2 till the and of 3, etc. You can't really "understand" that through this rhythmic shorthand (as I like to think of it) but that shorthand is a way to get up and playing via imitation (without understanding what you are doing or why it works).

Best,

Sean
#7
Quote by PeterTaps

Is there some standard language to describe strumming patterns in more detail?

Yeah, it`s called sheet music
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
#8
Thank you all for your help. I found a few online tutorials on music theory. Here is what I understood:

1. A music sheet contains staffs.
2. A staff contains measures. A measure is the distance between two bar lines.
3. A staff also indicates the number of beats in the measure.
4. A staff also indicates the time value of each note in the measure.

For example, a time signature of 4/4 means there are 4 beats to the measure and the quarter note gets one beat.

I would appreciate your help on some things that are still not clear to me:

1. What is the relationship between a measure and physical time. Is one measure equal to one second? Or, is one beat equal to some milliseconds? If I look at the music sheet and see that a measure has 16 beats, what does it mean in terms of speed of playing? How fast or slow do I play?

2. If a given piece of music has ten measures, are all the measures required to have the same number of beats?

3. I have heard the term beats per minute (BPM). From music theory perspective, is it fundamental that a song has the same BPM throughout?

Thank you once again for your help.

Regards,
Peter
#9
Quote by PeterTaps
I would appreciate your help on some things that are still not clear to me:

1. What is the relationship between a measure and physical time. Is one measure equal to one second? Or, is one beat equal to some milliseconds? If I look at the music sheet and see that a measure has 16 beats, what does it mean in terms of speed of playing? How fast or slow do I play?

At the top of a piece of sheet music there will be a tempo mark, for example ("quarter note symbol" = 60). So that's 60bpm. If the time signature is 4/4, then each quarter note beat will last for the given tempo. In other words, one bar will last 4 seconds. That's a weird way of analysing music, you wouldn't really think of it in terms of seconds, but to answer your question.....

2. If a given piece of music has ten measures, are all the measures required to have the same number of beats?

Generally yes. Although in some genre's this may not be the case.
3. I have heard the term beats per minute (BPM). From music theory perspective, is it fundamental that a song has the same BPM throughout?

Yes, but again, in some genre's this may not be the case. For example, progressive music may have tempo changes throughout the composition.
Last edited by mdc at Sep 28, 2011,
#10
Quote by PeterTaps
2. If a given piece of music has ten measures, are all the measures required to have the same number of beats?

Not at all. I know songs where every measure has a different amount of beats.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#11
Quote by maximumrocker
Look up the written notation of the music. as well as learn how the notations of rhythm. It should be to hard to learn. If you have any questions about it you can ask here


This! except I think he means it shouldn't be to hard to read.
#12
Quote by mdc
At the top of a piece of sheet music there will be a tempo mark, for example ("quarter note symbol" = 60). So that's 60bpm. If the time signature is 4/4, then each quarter note beat will last for the given tempo. In other words, one bar will last 4 seconds. That's a weird way of analysing music, you wouldn't really think of it in terms of seconds, but to answer your question.....


To follow up on this, the best way to envision it is to hear it, and the best way to hear it is with a metronome.