#1
This seems hopeless, im trying to play bubble toes by Jack Johnson and I cant seem to train my fingers to move in time from G to C. anyone know any practice exercises that would help with chord progression in general. Or should i just play it at a slower tempo a million times and try to go faster little by little.
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#2
Quote by Cloudkicker
Or should i just play it at a slower tempo a million times and try to go faster little by little.

This, but not the last bit. The speed will come naturally, never force it. Don't even try to do it to a set tempo, just concentrate on placing your fingers accurately. Speed is a by-product of accuracy.
Last edited by mdc at Sep 21, 2011,
#3
Quote by mdc
This, but not the last bit. The speed will come naturally, never force it. Don't even try to do it to a set tempo, just concentrate on placing your fingers accurately. Speed is a by-product of accuracy.


This. the tempo will come to you in time. just practice shifting your fingers into the right position don't worry about the tempo it'll happen.
#4
Quote by mdc
This, but not the last bit. The speed will come naturally, never force it. Don't even try to do it to a set tempo, just concentrate on placing your fingers accurately. Speed is a by-product of accuracy.

This. Whenever I'm learning a song with a chord progression i've never seen, my first reaction is "... ****..." then i go " oh, this isn't so bad."
^^^ I was like that when I first did G to C, now it's like "wow, why did that seem so hard?"
#5
Quote by Cloudkicker
This seems hopeless, im trying to play bubble toes by Jack Johnson and I cant seem to train my fingers to move in time from G to C. anyone know any practice exercises that would help with chord progression in general. Or should i just play it at a slower tempo a million times and try to go faster little by little.


One mistake a lot of beginners make is to try to hold the first chord for the full duration, and as a result they get to the second chord late.

Instead, leave the first chord early. Give yourself enough time to get to the second chord on the "one" of the measure. This will make your song sound better while you work on getting the time it takes you to switch down.

Are you playing a four-finger G or a three-finger G? (eg: 320022 or 320003?). I prefer the four finger G, but while you're developing your coordination the three-finger might work better, since you can use your pinkie on the high string, middle finger on the low E, which leaves your index finger free to hover over the first fret of the B string for the C chord.
#6
Another thing to consider, is how well do you know the C and G chords? Can you play them infallibly? Do you ever have to think, or adjust where your fingers are?

If so, that will greatly limit your ability to use them in a progression. Personally, I find when I have troubles with a progression, it's actually troubles with one (or sometimes more) of the chords themselves in the progression, and I step back to make sure I have the basics down.

With chords, I'll do simple things like just moving the hand in to position, posing the hand in position until it's relaxes (training muscle memory) things like that.

It just seems like so often when I have trouble with something, it's the previous 'steps' I need to work on. Once those are good, the current one isn't as much of a problem.
#7
You can make both the G chord and the C chord with one, or two fingers:

G chord

3
0
0
x
x
x

C chord

0
1
0
x
x
x

I show these chords to my absolute beginner students. You can add another finger if you want too! Using less strings and less fingers makes the whole thing easier for you. Later, when you get used to playing with less strings, you can easily add more
#8
1. Grab a metronome

2. Set it to about 25bpm


3. do this


G   G   G  G   C  C  C  C

1   2   3   4   1  2  3   4



The bottom number will be the click. After you play the last G move into the C chord and make your movements as SMALL as possible. Once you are completely comfortable at this speed, increase it by 3bpm.

Once you've made decent progress, lets say 50bpm. Leave that exercise for a while. come back to it the next day and you should find the change a lot easier.

Key ponts.

Slow down

Make movements as small a possible ( dont let your fingers flail away from the fretboard )

Increase speed only when you are 100% comfortable
#10
Quote by HotspurJr
One mistake a lot of beginners make is to try to hold the first chord for the full duration, and as a result they get to the second chord late.

Instead, leave the first chord early. Give yourself enough time to get to the second chord on the "one" of the measure. This will make your song sound better while you work on getting the time it takes you to switch down.

Are you playing a four-finger G or a three-finger G? (eg: 320022 or 320003?). I prefer the four finger G, but while you're developing your coordination the three-finger might work better, since you can use your pinkie on the high string, middle finger on the low E, which leaves your index finger free to hover over the first fret of the B string for the C chord.


Helpful advice for me also thanks!
#11
how are your barre chords? G and C are on top of each other and very quick to go from one to another. G is E shaped barre chord on the 3rd fret and C is the A shaped barre chord on the 3rd fret
G C
3 3x
5 3
5 5
4 5
3 5
3 3

If you practice these shapes that transition might be easier.
he of tranquil mind
#12
Quote by mrbabo91
1. Grab a metronome

2. Set it to about 25bpm


3. do this


G   G   G  G   C  C  C  C

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4



The bottom number will be the click. After you play the last G move into the C chord and make your movements as SMALL as possible. Once you are completely comfortable at this speed, increase it by 3bpm.

Once you've made decent progress, lets say 50bpm. Leave that exercise for a while. come back to it the next day and you should find the change a lot easier.

Key ponts.

Slow down

Make movements as small a possible ( dont let your fingers flail away from the fretboard )

Increase speed only when you are 100% comfortable



This is good, but I would highly recommend switching chords more like C - G - C - G - C - G

The reason you don't want to play 4 strums on G and 4 on C is because say in 5 minutes you practice this exercise, you have changed chords maybe 100 times.

But if you play C - G - C - G, instead of C - C - C - C - G - G - G - G.... you have now changed chords 400 times in those same 5 minutes. You get MORE practice, in less time.
#13
Quote by maltmn
You can make both the G chord and the C chord with one, or two fingers:

G chord

3
0
0
x
x
x

C chord

0
1
0
x
x
x

I show these chords to my absolute beginner students. You can add another finger if you want too! Using less strings and less fingers makes the whole thing easier for you. Later, when you get used to playing with less strings, you can easily add more

I never heard of that, nor is it in my chord book but they sound just like G and C. Are they looked down upon because of the ease or what?
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#14
Cloudkicker , believe me we've all been there , and after a couple of weeks you WILL OWN these chords , just keep practicing , trust me on that .
PS : English is not my first language
#15
LOL I'm not sure why they aren't used. In my book, they're on page 5

The reason they sound like G and C is because they have all the notes that those chords have:

G chord = G B D
C chord = C E G

0 = E
1 = C
0 = G
x
x
x

3 = G
0 = B
0 = D
x
x
x

haha

If you want to simplify chords without knowing what notes you need... Take the full chord shape, and cut out the lower strings... You can use 4 strings, 5 strings... or 3 strings.

For example... here's an F-chord:

1
1
2
x
x
x

or

1
1
2
3
x
x

or

0
0
2
3
3
1

(yes you can also remove the high strings from the equation if you want... it can make your chords sound really cool!)

Here's C with an open B string

0
0
0
2
3
x

The A chord with open B string

0
0
2
2
0
x

Experiment and write down the new chords you discover!!! Try using these chords in your own music too!
Last edited by maltmn at Sep 22, 2011,
#17
Quote by maltmn
3 = G
0 = B
0 = D
x
x
x

That's not a D note on the 3rd string

It's a G.

Nevertheless, you could add the open D-string there.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#19
Just fancied taking a very simple progression and experimenting with open/closed voicings and inversions. I love the possibilities the guitar presents.

-----
-------8-
-0--12-5-7
-10-9----5
-7-----7-
----10---7
#20
Quote by mdc
Just fancied taking a very simple progression and experimenting with open/closed voicings and inversions. I love the possibilities the guitar presents.

-----
-------8-
-0--12-5-7
-10-9----5
-7-----7-
----10---7


Cmaj
Gmaj
Cmaj
Gmaj


I like what you did there
#21
Here's a good exercise for getting better at changing chords:

Pick a chord (for example G major), then pick another chord (it helps if it's in the same key sig....maybe C major). And practice changing from one chord to the other.