#1
im done with music theory for dummies and i think i absorbed the info in it quite well, i'll still be looking into it as a reference to remember points here and there and check out some things, but i was wondering if theres another book i can get that will help me take it from there and learn further, any suggestions?
#3
Any music book will do. I assume you want to go into intervals/scales/voice leading so any music book that entails that will most likely do the trick. I personally use Tonal Harmony by McGraw for secondary school and that provides a very basic outlook for music theory.
#4
My tutorials at http://lessons.mikedodge.com have some stuff you'd be interested in I'm sure.

But my one-off lessons at http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/one-off-lessons-and-concepts-f2.html?sid=ca8ca06b08e7331069522f0514e39a19 will but your theory knowledge to the test. There's some pretty deep stuff there.

Both of those sites explore application theory in depth. Some theory as well as some concepts, but all application related.
#5
okay guys i'll be checking these out:-) anything else? i want something that picks off where "music theory for dummies" left off
#8
Well it's impossible to know where exactly you stand in relation to music theory.

What do you think you know? Can you apply it directly to music? What do you think you don't know?

I'm under the impression that when learning any topic thoroughly, once you start grasping it you should already know what you need to learn.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by Alijonroth
haha sure, will be reading some parts again but i still feel like theres more i wasnt told u knw?


Well we still don't know what you know....you know?

If I have a progression which goes:

Am D C G E

What key is it in? What scale/s would I use to improvise over it? Identify any out-of-key chords. How should I change my scales to adapt for these chords?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Quote by AlanHB
Well it's impossible to know where exactly you stand in relation to music theory.

What do you think you know? Can you apply it directly to music? What do you think you don't know?

I'm under the impression that when learning any topic thoroughly, once you start grasping it you should already know what you need to learn.



well, the book is really good explaining how to read music, but i felt the part about constructing melodies, using scales, forming chord progressions and music forms was a bit lacking
also the book didnt rlly get into detail about the circle of fifths. it says its very important and has many uses but doesnt get into much detail on how it is used
and the book doesnt mention modes at all or their uses, the only scales explained (very good though) are major,minor,harmonic, melodic...but not how you can use them or go form one to another etc
it also doesnt talk about consonant/dissonant intervals and how to use tension and release between them in music

i know there's more, this is just off the top of my head..it was a very good book though and im trying to implement some of the things i learned from it as much as i can, but i want smth else to take me further
#12
Quote by AlanHB
Well we still don't know what you know....you know?

If I have a progression which goes:

Am D C G E

What key is it in? What scale/s would I use to improvise over it? Identify any out-of-key chords. How should I change my scales to adapt for these chords?



G major, you could improv in G major ,E Minor or other modes of the maj scale, im not sure but i think E maj is out of key, and i dont know the last Question

i learned how to identify keys from an online source btw, its not smth included in the book
#13
Nah Id say thats in A minor. The D would be a chord borrowed from A major (could use melodic minor) and the E chord (major/dominant V) is common in A minor (could use harmonic minor).
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#14
Quote by Alijonroth
G major, you could improv in G major ,E Minor or other modes of the maj scale, im not sure but i think E maj is out of key, and i dont know the last Question

i learned how to identify keys from an online source btw, its not smth included in the book


Unfortunately incorrect in many ways.

Quote by Hydra150
Nah Id say thats in A minor. The D would be a chord borrowed from A major (could use melodic minor) and the E chord (major/dominant V) is common in A minor (could use harmonic minor).


Correct.

And you would play the A minor scale over the progression. Over the D you would use a major 6th accidental (or A dorian scale if you wish) and over the E you would use a major 3rd accidental (or A harmonic minor scale).

Aijonroth, the contents page of the book here:

Part III: Harmony: Fleshing It Out
Chapter 10: Intervals
Chapter 11: Key Signatures and the Circle of Fifths
Chapter 12: The Major and Minor Scales
Chapter 13: Building Chords
Chapter 14: Chord Progressions
Chapter 15: Cadence

Will help you. I think that you may have read the book without applying it to your instrument, and for that reason, you'll have to go back through the book again, this time with the purpose of applying. It's basically the same as me reading a cook book then claiming I'm a chef without cooking anything.

I actually think it's good that modes are not addressed yet, as they require a knowledge of all of the above first.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#15
Read a college text book about music theory if you want something more in depth I haven't read Music theory for dummies though, can't tell you if that would help but my AP theory class has helped me. do what that guy said ^
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Quote by G.Krizzel
Music is just wiggly air. Accept it or leave it.


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#16
Quote by AlanHB

... and over the E you would use a major 7th accidental (or A harmonic minor scale).



Fix'd
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#17
Quote by Hydra150
Fix'd


Woah typo! Thanks for pointing that out.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#18
Quote by AlanHB
Unfortunately incorrect in many ways.


Correct.

And you would play the A minor scale over the progression. Over the D you would use a major 6th accidental (or A dorian scale if you wish) and over the E you would use a major 3rd accidental (or A harmonic minor scale).

Aijonroth, the contents page of the book here:

Part III: Harmony: Fleshing It Out
Chapter 10: Intervals
Chapter 11: Key Signatures and the Circle of Fifths
Chapter 12: The Major and Minor Scales
Chapter 13: Building Chords
Chapter 14: Chord Progressions
Chapter 15: Cadence

Will help you. I think that you may have read the book without applying it to your instrument, and for that reason, you'll have to go back through the book again, this time with the purpose of applying. It's basically the same as me reading a cook book then claiming I'm a chef without cooking anything.

I actually think it's good that modes are not addressed yet, as they require a knowledge of all of the above first.


you are not hearing me, i read the whole book and i did not read it i a hurry...its not about the chapter titles, its about the cotents. and the contents dont tell me anything i can "apply"

intervals: the chapter tells me interval names and how to figure them out on notation, distances between intervals, thats it. i know that!

key signatures and circle of fifths: the chapter tells you what a key signature is, how to figure it out on notation, how to use the circle of fifths to figure out sharps and flats in a key youre in and the relative minor scale

the major and minor scales: how to build major and minor scales and the sharps/ flats variations between natural/melodic/harmonic minor scales, and nothing on which scales go on which progressions! and nothing about modes!

building chords: how to construct triads, and seventh chords, and nothing about in key and out of key chords

chord progressions: the chapter (badly) goes into constructing chords from the major and minor scale then gives tables about common maj and minor progressions, the tables are useful, the explanations are very lacking

cadences was a good chapter, i picked up my guitar and im trying to construct chord progressions using the info i gained from these last two chapters

im not sure if you've read the book or not, but however the heck you guys came up with the key to that progression and the scales to be used over it (and the whole "borrowing" chords from another key thing" that stuff is not included in the book and i know because I READ THE FRIGGIN BOOK! help me out instead of assuming im inadequate...please?