#1
I posted a while ago about recording and the info I got was really helpful, however, I'm looking in a slightly different direction.
I'm running cubase 5 on my laptop, and my band are after doing a few demo tracks to show to our old music teacher in Canada.
I was wondering what kind of mic would be good to get. I need one suitable for vocals, and sticking in front of a bass / guitar amp. I was also wondering how to get a semi-decent recording from cubase (I'm an amateur with the program).

thanks guys! you're always a great help!
Nat.
#2
My favorite all purpose MIC is the Audio Technica AT4040, it will do vocals and can be used to close MIC or far MIC a guitar or bass cab. Sadly I cant help you with cubecase though, don't really know anything about it.
#3
sm 58 - vocal
sm 57 - vocal/guitar
DI - bass (I don't recommend mics for bass)
If you want recording with a computer, you need to get an audio interface to convert analog signal into digital signal)
#4
The gold standard used in many studio and live applications today is the Shure SM-57. This microphone has been around for years and is primarily used for miking instruments, however it's also a great vocal mic. It does not require phantom power. I can't say how well it works for bass cab applications, but they work quite nicely for guitar cabs, miking guitars and vocals.
#5
Make sure you're EQing all of your tracks properly, first off, and invest in an interface (a box you can plug mics and guitars to) Try getting Battery too, it's a VST plugin for drums. There's also a MIDI drum sequencer built into Cubase 5, you just have to create a MIDI track, and under the plugins and shit on the left of the screen find Beat Designer. it'll be in a drop down menu. Also just watch a lot of youtube videos online on how to use the programs. Learn the whole thing

Also, Berkely School of Music has free online courses, and one of them is for EQing in ProTools, but the same principals apply in Cubase.

This website has proper EQ settings for achieving better quality sounds --> http://www.crazypellas.net/producer-talk-107/a-guide-giving-you-frequencies-for-the-sound-you-want-when-eq-ing-53269/

As far as mics go, I use an Audio Technica Condenser mic for amps and such and a Baby Blue (not sure the brand) mic for vox.
#6
Quote by KG6_Steven
The gold standard used in many studio and live applications today is the Shure SM-57.


The SM-57 is about as much a gold standard in recording as the Whopper is to the burger industry. Everyone has had one. Everyone knows what it tastes like. It's better than a Big Mac, and when you're in a hurry and want something half-decent, it will fit the ticket.

That does not mean it is the best burger, or that it even represents a universal standard of quality.

I would say the gold standard for studio mics would be the U87. Like the SM57, pretty much any pro studio has one. Any pro engineer has worked with them, and will know what they sound like. And they make pretty well everything sound gold. Mind you, at about three grand, it should.

There are other, arguably better mics still (AEA 440, for instance, which rings in at five grand), but they're a little more esoteric and therefore not "familiar" enough to most people.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Thanks guys, this has been a big help! I'm curious as to these mythical "boxes" for converting the analogue audio to digital.
I'm sure I can figure out the cubase recording "stuff".
I'm working on the (very, very) cheap, and what would be the cheapest semi-decent box that I could get? and the only access at the moment that I would have to a shure mic, would be to steal the one they leave unattended in the school music rooms (on account of my being 15).
cost will always be a problem for me, so yeah, cheep and cheerful!
thanks for the help again!
#8
I wish you would have gotten on here sooner. We might have advised that you buy Reaper instead of Cubase (though I love Cubase), which would have saved you a difference of about $450, and then you could have gotten a really decent mic and interface.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by axemanchris
The SM-57 is about as much a gold standard in recording as the Whopper is to the burger industry. Everyone has had one. Everyone knows what it tastes like. It's better than a Big Mac, and when you're in a hurry and want something half-decent, it will fit the ticket.

That does not mean it is the best burger, or that it even represents a universal standard of quality.
Well bloody said. The SMs are popular for reasons of durability and consistency, they're not magical über-mics. They're designed to sound good at live gigs, while rejecting feedback and still being durable enough to survive the rigours of the road.


Let's make one thing clear.
THE SM58 IS NOT A GOOD RECORDING MIC.


You wouldn't enter a Formula One race driving a high-performance rally car, you wouldn't try and run a 100m Olympic sprint wearing high-tech mountaineering boots...and you wouldn't try and get studio-quality vocals with a handheld dynamic microphone.

The right tool for the job, folks.


To answer the original question though: get one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Behringer-C1U-Condenser-Microphone-Cardioid/dp/B001QXCYZY



It's cheap ($50), it's foolproof (plugs straight into your laptop's USB port) and sounds much, much better than an SM58/57. Problem solved. You can spend a bit more for a bump up in quality, but this is as cheap and easy as it gets.
Last edited by kyle62 at Sep 23, 2011,
#11
so, just whack the behringer C1-u into my laptop, and there it is, everything's sorted?
any tips and that for recording, I'm such a novice, I'm going to be reading tutorials for the next few weeks, but I already have a place to record with absolutely amazing acoustics!
also, Of course I paid for cubase!!! *winks*
#12
Quote by kyle62
Well bloody said. The SMs are popular for reasons of durability and consistency, they're not magical über-mics. They're designed to sound good at live gigs, while rejecting feedback and still being durable enough to survive the rigours of the road.


Let's make one thing clear.
THE SM58 IS NOT A GOOD RECORDING MIC.


You wouldn't enter a Formula One race driving a high-performance rally car, you wouldn't try and run a 100m Olympic sprint wearing high-tech mountaineering boots...and you wouldn't try and get studio-quality vocals with a handheld dynamic microphone.

The right tool for the job, folks.


To answer the original question though: get one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Behringer-C1U-Condenser-Microphone-Cardioid/dp/B001QXCYZY



It's cheap ($50), it's foolproof (plugs straight into your laptop's USB port) and sounds much, much better than an SM58/57. Problem solved. You can spend a bit more for a bump up in quality, but this is as cheap and easy as it gets.



This microphone is perfect for vocals & this mic is simply plug & I have windows 7. I didn't have to install nothing exept for the aios driver so I could use it with adobe audition 3 which is great. I get professional studio sound from this mic its just crystal clear. I don't have the pop filter yet so when I get that I know I'll love it more. Get this Mic if you need a good mic but have little money to spend on one this will do the job.


#13
Quote by kyle62
Let's make one thing clear.
...THE SM58 IS NOT A GOOD RECORDING MIC.

You wouldn't enter a Formula One race driving a high-performance rally car, you wouldn't try and run a 100m Olympic sprint wearing high-tech mountaineering boots...and you wouldn't try and get studio-quality vocals with a handheld dynamic microphone.

The right tool for the job, folks.


Sometimes, a 58 will be the right tool for the job, though. To use your analogy, it won't win a formula one race, but if you're mountain climbing, it might be just the thing!

I can't imagine anyone having any issues throwing a 58 or two at some toms - especially floor tom - now and again. (as a for instance)

Also, I had a singer that I recorded whose voice sounded strident through everything I threw at her - my LDC, a large-diaphragm dynamic, my own favourite live vocal mic, etc. Finally, as a last resort (yes, a last resort), I threw a 58 in front of her and it was absolutely bloody fantastic.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
^ yep there is never a "universal" mic if you will. There are so many variables that go into it that even if you have the "proper" suggested mic for a certain type of recording. It may not be right for that certain situation.
#15
Quote by scguitarking927
^ yep there is never a "universal" mic if you will. There are so many variables that go into it that even if you have the "proper" suggested mic for a certain type of recording. It may not be right for that certain situation.

Very true. I'd say a LDC is the best compromise - they make most things sound good.
A good dynamic can potentially sound great with the right singer (following from what Chris said, female voices can work really nicely with the '58, it beefs them up a bit!), but a good preamp chain is important.


One slight point that didn't occur to me in my rant was that condenser mics pick up a lot more room sound than a dynamic. So if you're recording in a really horrible sounding room with lots of reflection, you could look at a high-end dynamic.
Personally I'd rather just find some way of temporarily treating the space, but it's worth bringing up. Condenser, condenser, über alles...