#1
I've wrote a song that goes like this


Intro - Bm C#sus2

Verse - Bsus4add9 Asus2 Bsus4add9 C#m9

Chorus - Dminadd9 A5 C5

I plan on improvising over the top and i beleive the intro is in Bm, the verse is in C#m and the chorus is in Dm.

Im currently using Bnatural minor to solo over the intro, C#natural minor to solo over the verse and Dm pentatonic to solo over the chorus.

Im unsure about the intro because the C#sus 2 chord contains notes that aren't in the key of B minor (D# and G#)

Should i use accidentals when these chords come up or can i get away with sticking to the notes of B minor?

Im pretty sure ive got the verse and the chorus correct but im not to sure about the intro.
#3
I'd question that you know what you are doing, in writing these. Do you know what the tonal centers of these mini progressions are?

What you want to do is maybe harmonically determine your tonal center? Where does each section feel resolved and or terminate. Even if you have outside notes in a chord, resolving your melodies along the lines of the chord tones will sound best at the R 3 5 level. My counsel would be to first map the "functions" of your progression, and what the "movement" is - i.e. cadences, key and tonal center. Analyze the chord tones in context of the "key" that you've determined these to be. Find tones which may "cross over" if, there are any legitimate key changes. Identify where each change modulates or is initiated, etc.

Many people come up with something that sounds good to them and expects to find the "perfect single" scales to "improvise" which is code for carpetbombing their same tired "shredding licks" in a desperate attempt to shed their terminal "sameness" to everything they do, not realizing that their biggest problem isn't the Holy Grail X scale, it's themselves and their commitment towards properly learning to understand and identify what they are doing, rather than betting on randomness. While accidents can and do happen, it's usually a better thing to understand and consider many approaches, such as selecting a common pitch between keys at the moment of modulation, or a strategic line meandering towards a leading tone blending into the chord tone at the point of modulation, say a ii chord signaling the pending change being anticipated.

Best,

Sean
#4
Well the intro progression was designed to be in B minor and it certainly does resolve on B minor. The reason why i chose a the C#Sus2 chord was purely becuase i liked how it sounded in relation to the Bm chord. I tried fitting in a dim5 chord and a few others in there instead but it wasn't the sound i was looking for.

The verse was originally planned to be in B minor and i didn't intentionally modulate. it was only later that i realised the progression resolved on the C#minor chord.

I then decided to modulate to D on the chorus just because i liked the sound of the Dmadd9 chord coming in at that ponit.
#5
You're most likely in the Key of A major.

Theory tells me, that in a Vamp - the B to C#m to B is at best, inconclusive so I'd Identify that as a ii iii ii

Your chords for the verse, indicate the ii I ii iii in A - I'm not seeing what I'd Expect to see for a resolution to the tonal center of Bm, which would be an F# or an E. The Dm on the iv is a cool switch you have to account for the possible clash of the F# and F notes, and handle that chord with care.

As for the chorus/key change, Dm alone wouldn't do it to sell me, but the A definitely spells a V-i, so that would sell it for me. I could go with Dm as a i C as a bVII and A as the V. Works for me, but you have to consider places where that could clash, and plan it appropriately - much more of a challenge and the need to respect chord tones, and not aimless playing.

Best,

Sean
#6
Quote by Sean0913
You're most likely in the Key of A major.

Theory tells me, that in a Vamp - the B to C#m to B is at best, inconclusive so I'd Identify that as a ii iii ii

Your chords for the verse, indicate the ii I ii iii in A - I'm not seeing what I'd Expect to see for a resolution to the tonal center of Bm, which would be an F# or an E. The Dm on the iv is a cool switch you have to account for the possible clash of the F# and F notes, and handle that chord with care.

As for the chorus/key change, Dm alone wouldn't do it to sell me, but the A definitely spells a V-i, so that would sell it for me. I could go with Dm as a i C as a bVII and A as the V. Works for me, but you have to consider places where that could clash, and plan it appropriately - much more of a challenge and the need to respect chord tones, and not aimless playing.

Best,

Sean


Im 99% sure that the verse progression of Bsus4add9 Asus2 Bsus4add9 C#m9 resolves on the C#. It doesn't sound like A major at all.

Im playing all these chords as arpegios so i dont if that changes the sound/ makes it harder to identify anything clashing.
#7
Quote by mrbabo91
Im 99% sure that the verse progression of Bsus4add9 Asus2 Bsus4add9 C#m9 resolves on the C#. It doesn't sound like A major at all.

Im playing all these chords as arpegios so i dont if that changes the sound/ makes it harder to identify anything clashing.



Then you have C#m as the key - when I played it just a second ago, I felt that it pulled back well to the Bsus.

I can also hear/feel how I can easily pull back overall to make it feel right on the E as the overall tonal center that feels like it's most resolved, but that's just theory/instinct.

As for your arps, I am not sure that it has any bearing on how that changes what you can do, since the function will still be "felt" - I think you still have to consider chord tones and make sure you know where the clashes are and use them for tension resolution ideas, or else avoid them altogether.

Best,

Sean.
#8
Quote by Sean0913
Then you have C#m as the key - when I played it just a second ago, I felt that it pulled back well to the Bsus.

I can also hear/feel how I can easily pull back overall to make it feel right on the E as the overall tonal center that feels like it's most resolved, but that's just theory/instinct.

As for your arps, I am not sure that it has any bearing on how that changes what you can do, since the function will still be "felt" - I think you still have to consider chord tones and make sure you know where the clashes are and use them for tension resolution ideas, or else avoid them altogether.

Best,

Sean.


I tried pulling back to A major in the intro like this

Bm C#sus2 Bm A

and like you said, it works well and feels kinda resolved on the A.

Could the reason why the verse progression sounds resolved on C# be because the C# chord is the only one implied minor and the other two are ambigous?
#9
Quote by mrbabo91
I tried pulling back to A major in the intro like this

Bm C#sus2 Bm A

and like you said, it works well and feels kinda resolved on the A.

Could the reason why the verse progression sounds resolved on C# be because the C# chord is the only one implied minor and the other two are ambigous?



Not to my ears. I think it feels resolved on C#m is because if it's close connection with E Major, A C#m7 is C# E G# B - E Major is E G# B.

Your B is the V chord of an E Major. E major is very easy to unconsciously "feel" when you've gone to the C#m7, after playing the V.

The A could feel like it works there as well, because it can imply an easy Plagal cadence to the I in E.

If you don't understand all that, then it's well over your head most likely and you need a much more basic starting point. If so, just keep at it, learn what you can for now, and keep things organized and linear, so that you can support knowledge by attaching it to pre-existing knowledge and thus, a foundation.

Best,

Sean