#1
Hey all. I'm new to intervals and I'm trying to learn scales. I know that the intervals for Minor Pentatonic are R, Minor 3rd, 4th, 5th, Minor 7th. What is it for Major pentatonic?



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#4
It's the same thing, just from a different starting note. For example, the minor pentatonic scale shape that starts from the 5th fret is an A minor pentatonic scale. However, if you play the same shape exactly at the same frets, but play the 8th fret, the scale would be a C major scale.

This due to the fact the A is the relative minor of C.
#5
Wait... According to Sean, I just forget about the 4 and 7. But according to felakutihimself (hereafter referred to as Fella) the shape stays the same and it depends on the note. I don't understand Fella's explanation.
"This due to the fact the A is the relative minor of C."


Okay, So... Sean. The Pentatonic Major is Root, Major 2nd, Major 3rd, Perfect 5th, and Perfect 6th. There are no half steps except for the march from Major 3rd to Perfect 5th (it's three half steps, so one step and one half.) -- I understand now. Thanks, Sean. By the way, I might soon come into enough money for your first lesson.



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Last edited by SkittlesR at Sep 23, 2011,
#6
I'm hoping Sean would correct if I'm wrong. But I basically meant what you said exactly.

From what I know, the relative minor of a major key is 3 semitones below it, hence, A is the relative minor of C major. So if you play the regular A minor Pentatonic scale, but start from the second note of the scale (C), You would have a C major pentatonic.
#7
Well... Fella, it's easier the way that Sean explains.



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#9
Quote by SkittlesR
Wait... According to Sean, I just forget about the 4 and 7. But according to felakutihimself (hereafter referred to as Fella) the shape stays the same and it depends on the note. I don't understand Fella's explanation.


Okay, So... Sean. The Pentatonic Major is Root, Major 2nd, Major 3rd, Perfect 5th, and Perfect 6th. There are no half steps except for the march from Major 3rd to Perfect 5th (it's three half steps, so one step and one half.) -- I understand now. Thanks, Sean. By the way, I might soon come into enough money for your first lesson.

Major 6th.

Alright buddy, glad to see your getting familiar with intervals and scales now. Good job!

Btw, even though his input was brief, what he said is important to grasp.

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Start on the second note you wrote.
Last edited by mdc at Sep 23, 2011,
#10
Major sixth? I thought that it was just sixth. I was told it went Perfect fourth, aug 4th/flat fifth, perfect 5th, sixth, minor 7th, major 7th, octave.

Also, why is
Start on the second note you wrote.
important? It made no sense to me.



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Last edited by SkittlesR at Sep 23, 2011,
#11
Tonic---Minor2nd---2nd---Minor3rd---Major3rd---Perfect4th---Aug4th/Diminished5th---5th---Minor6th---Major6th---Minor7th---Major7th

Natural Minor has flattened 3rd,6th,7th
Harmonic Minor has flattened 3rd,6th

If you take the Minor Pen and use the Minor 3rd interval as the tonic you get-
Tonic---Major2nd---Major3rd---Major5th---Major6th<--- the major Pen scale
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#12
Quote by SkittlesR
Major sixth? I thought that it was just sixth. I was told it went Perfect fourth, aug 4th/flat fifth, perfect 5th, minor sixth, major sixth minor 7th, major 7th, octave.

Also, why is important? It made no sense to me.

So you now know the shape of the major pentatonic scale. Start on the second note of the minor pentatonic scale you learned a short while back. you will see that the two scales are related, in that they contain the exact same notes.
#13
Quote by SkittlesR
Major sixth? I thought that it was just sixth. I was told it went Perfect fourth, aug 4th/flat fifth, perfect 5th, sixth, minor 7th, major 7th, octave.

Also, why is important? It made no sense to me.



It goes: Perfect Fourth, aug4th/b5, Perfect Fifth, minor sixth, major sixth, minor seventh, major seventh, octave. You must have been misinformed or have heard wrongly

In regard to the 'start on the second note' of the same shape advice, this is because any major key has a related minor key which uses exactly the same notes. When you play the notes C D E F G A B C with C as the root, your ear hears the following pattern of intervals (spaces) between the notes - T T S T T T S - this is the major scale (T = tone; S= semitone). If you play the same notes but start on the A, with A as the root note, you hear a different interval pattern - T S T T S T T - the minor scale. This is the basic concept of 'relative major and minor' and explains why you can use a minor pentatonic scale shape to play a major pentatonic scale if the starting note (root note) is changed.

Having said all that, Sean's explanantion was really good and I recommend you think of it that way for the time being, but I hope some light has been shed anyway,

#14
CBannerman, you've shed much light on the subject. I thank you.



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#16
And all that has been mentioned or tripped over I go through in our online courses, you won't be lacking anything.

All the Intervals in a Major scale are considered Major except for the Unison (the 1 doubled) the 4th 5th and the Octave, which are known as Perfect. EVERY other interval, in a Major scale is ONLY a Major Interval, i.e. the 6th is Major - you can also call it a 6th without naming it as "Major 6th", and its assumed to be Major by default.

See? Easy.

Our understanding of all music theory begins and is based upon the Major Scale (there are those who love to say its the chromatic, and at that point, I agree to disagree, and not split hairs over it)*

* Major, unless you are referring to it in a Minor key, at which point, those in the know will usually assume the 6th is a b6, unless it's referring to a Dorian Scale, but...if you understand that...fine, if not, don't go following this down the rabbit hole until you have sufficient foundation and practice with the basics, this information is put there to ward off any helpful "corrections". Don't let this * throw you. The information is solid.

Best,

Sean