#1
Basically, I'm here because I've got a dilemma...

I'm going for a music audition next week to get into a course at university, where I have to play a few pieces of music (along with a theory test).
So, I'm looking for help here for a couple of reasons...

Firstly, I'm planning to look at a couple of chord charts that will require me to play them through once, then solo over it a second time.
Does any one know of any good ones? And does anyone think that would be acceptable?

Secondly, does anyone know what exactly a performance like this would want to show to the 'judges'?
I'm assuming they'd want to see musical fluency, sight reading, rhythm and timing, but is there anything else I should know of?

Thanks to anyone that can help with this...
#3
Try to play things that go over a wide variety of techniques within the same song, and not just the same skill played numerous ways.

My tiny tidbit.


Also, if this were a vote for me thread he'd be in the negatives >_>
People in the pit take my post way too seriously.

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#4
Take 5 or Birdland.
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#5
since it's jazz, pretend that you hate distortion more than Mr. Turner hates Dinkleberg.
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#7
Quote by tyler_j
Basically, I'm here because I've got a dilemma...

I'm going for a music audition next week to get into a course at university, where I have to play a few pieces of music (along with a theory test).
So, I'm looking for help here for a couple of reasons...

Firstly, I'm planning to look at a couple of chord charts that will require me to play them through once, then solo over it a second time.
Does any one know of any good ones? And does anyone think that would be acceptable?

Secondly, does anyone know what exactly a performance like this would want to show to the 'judges'?
I'm assuming they'd want to see musical fluency, sight reading, rhythm and timing, but is there anything else I should know of?

Thanks to anyone that can help with this...


Blues For Alice and Autumn Leaves are two good ones.
If the "judges" are anything like my examiners then this may help:

Soloing:
Example: If you are just playing G blues or a G pentatonic scale over a G chord or using only those scales because the whole piece is in the key of G, they will not be too impressed.
Find other scales (blues, pentatonic, harmonic minor, natural minor, bebop, lydian b7) that will work well over the chord to add some more flavor to it. Don't keep things strictly diatonic because it can get quite boring after a while, but don't go so off track that it sounds like you don't know what the hell you're doing.
Too, if they hear you changing scales with the chord changes then that should work in your favor.
Using different rhythm patterns can also work nicely to bring more life to your solo. Using combinations of triplets, duplets and all the other "-lets" as well as using a combo of different note values and lengths can add more interest for your solo. Don't overuse some rhythm patterns (like using triplets at every turn), but rather using some rhythm patterns strategically and cause some "eyebrow raiser" moments - which people love. Also using dynamics and different articulation in your solo can bring about a new vibe to it.
Articulation and technical things can also go here. Use bends, staccatos, accents, trills, hammer ons and pull offs, tremolo picking and so on and so forth.
Now the trick is you use all of these things in conjunction with each other to come up with a killer improv solo. Lots and lots of practice to keep your audience entertained and not to nod off to sleep because they can predict exactly where your solo is going to.

Prepared playing:
If you are playing chords then makes sure you know the chords well, and perhaps know a couple different voicings. Be spot-on with your timing - play things where they should be and don't speed up or slow down (or try your best - metronome [or backing track!]) Be able to play the chords cleanly and fluently. If there are any band hits, nail those.
Pay special attention to dynamics and articulation (if any) and to the style description. If the style is swing then so some nice comping. If they style is bossa nova then play a clave rhythm pattern or something. Be rhythmically appropriate.
^ that's only really for chord slash notation. if you have written out rhythms then go by that.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. Good luck!
#8
The ideal unaccompanied jazz guitar performance involves mostly chord soloing, in which you play the melody along with the chords using voice leading that make it possible to address the melody line and the bass line, with bits of melodic improvisation in between melodic inactivity. You can arrange most ballads/mid swings from the Real Book to be played this way. Two times through the chorus is usually enough.


Like this but not nearly as good
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyjQv52Nzno

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Last edited by Xiaoxi at Sep 24, 2011,