#1
Hi everyone,

Does anyone know of an effect or technique, in Cubase, that would allow me to pan a channel based on the pitch/tone? I'd like a certain acoustic section to pan the lowest notes left and the highest notes right, without having to use DAW Automation.

Is there any simple way to achieve this, or is it going to require a LOT of multi-tracking?

Thanks!

*edit* after doing some research I found a lot of people use two opposing tracks - 100%L and 100%R with equally opposing EQs. I tried this and it worked to some extent, but not well. Are there any VSTs that actually do it based on an algorithm? Just wondering... I realize there's a hell of a lot more going on than just a "note." There's a whole "spectrum" of frequencies that have to get processed...
Last edited by CV334 at Sep 24, 2011,
#3
Quote by ethan_hanus
Do you want a program that can separate each note from a chord and pan them? That's almost impossible.

I highly doubt there is a program that will do it, you'll just have to do it manually with the write function.


Not a chord- that would be a mess... Single notes at a time. I was thinking of some kind of LFO function based on pitch that would pan to a side. When I read about opposing EQs, it made sense. The problem is that when I tried it, everything rang out on the high-frequency side and resonated on the low side. It wasn't ideal.

I'm thinking of making 5 tracks with total filters except for a frequency range- maybe 0-1000, 1000-2000, 3000-4000, 5000-6000, 6000+

It'll probably sound weird but it's worth a shot.
#5
Quote by ethan_hanus
A phaser maybe? It shifts the pitch from side to side, maybe with a slow shift?


Hmm... I'll toy with that... Thanks for the idea!
#6
Quote by CV334
without having to use DAW Automation.


Just stop being lazy and do this, as much as it might suck you should see the amount of automation professional producers put on some things, especially vocals.
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#7
Quote by ChemicalFire
Just stop being lazy and do this, as much as it might suck you should see the amount of automation professional producers put on some things, especially vocals.


Oh, trust me, I'm not being lazy. I put a considerable amount of time putting good automation into my recordings. The issue is that panning automation pans the whole channel. I am looking to pan certain frequencies for a more panoramic effect. I do not want the reverb from a prior note to be panned along with the next note.
#8
Quote by CV334
Oh, trust me, I'm not being lazy. I put a considerable amount of time putting good automation into my recordings. The issue is that panning automation pans the whole channel. I am looking to pan certain frequencies for a more panoramic effect. I do not want the reverb from a prior note to be panned along with the next note.

copy the channel pan one left and pan one right

cut the notes out of the channel you don't want panned on each channel

eh its an idea that requires not automation
#9
you know how people say not to copy and paste when multi-tracking? this sounds like one of the times where you can/should. you might want to do three or four copies instead of just two hard left and right. or maybe dont go completely hard to either side. i just messed with it for a couple minutes, and it seemed to work ok, and i have heard of other people doing it well. anything in the middle is going to be additive, so i found i had to keep the middle channel (or channels) at a lower volume. the more tweak the EQs to fit the notes being played and do some volume automation, the better you should be able to get it to sound.
#10
I had to do this for a recording of a guitar part once in a breakdown, a little arpeggiated lick. I transcribed the part in midi, ran it through a simple clean guitar VST sound, and then some amp simulation and room simulation software to try and achieve a similar sound to the original recording, automated it (obviously a lot easier when working with midi) and then blended it in lower in the mix with the original. It was quite successful; you couldn't really notice anything unnatural sounding, but it wouldn't work if you wanted hard panning of course.
#11
The only way I can think of doing this automatically, would involve either a) creating your own plug-in (easy concept but can be tricky to code to suit various formats) or b) with Ableton Live, and the Maxx For Live add-on program, then creating a patch that analyses the frequency of a note and then pans different amounts for different frequency bands - if I can remember how you'd go about doing it, I'd be happy to help but I doubt you wanna go ahead and buy a new DAW + new software (plus, I don't wanna buy Ableton/Maxx so unless you gave me a copy I'd be going by memory )


What you're after is doable though - it's just more complex, right now, than simply throwing a plug-in on there, as there probably isn't much demand for it as a commercial plug-in.
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#12
Well, this topic has given me some ideas for some new crazy weird mix ideas :p
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#13
Quote by lockwolf
Well, this topic has given me some ideas for some new crazy weird mix ideas :p


You cold have your notes play panned like 75% each way and then have reverb down the center and a reversed reverb that reverbates from that while delayed and slighted distorted