#1
does aluminum foil work as sheilding? it would go in the cavitey on a strar with just a p90 in the bridge and an on/off switch for controls
#2
if you soldered a ground wire to the foil then i think it will work.
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#4
okay thanks alot. I knew i had to solder it. I just didint know if the aluminumfoil would even do any good.
#5
It can be better than nothing, but not much.

It's not really a thin sheet of aluminum, but rather a suspension of aluminum flakes in plastic.

It can be tough to even solder foil.

This is your best bet:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/dimarzio-copper-shielding-tape/364741000000795

This works for sure. Don't forget to put it on the back of the pick guard, too--unless it's made of metal, too. And don't worry about soldering that to a ground--as long as it comes out to your pots you're good because the pots should be grounded. Of course if you need more than one strip, you'll have to solder them to each other.
#6
Solder won't adhere to the foil. I'd recommend ordering some copper tape. You can solder to it.
#7
Copper tape is best. Shielding paint isn't quite as effect as copper tape and you can't solder to it but it's easier to apply and you can still have it ground properly if you have something like a pickguard with copper tape in contact with it. Aluminum foil wouldn't shield the guitar any better than shielding paint would, it would be harder to apply and you still wouldn't be able to solder to it.
#8
plus you realize you have to adhere it to the guitars cavity with spray or paint on glue.

heavy foil, dont use non stick foil, over lap the foil, and solder to it like said.

BUT imo,
for the work of it, i'd rather use a self adhere copper foil, to actually get the best
out of the job.

no reason to go half-assed.

note the foil comes out of the cavity, to the screw hole.

and the guard like said..

Jenneh

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Last edited by jj1565 at Sep 25, 2011,
#9
I use it on my strat. Every other guitar gets conductive paint and foil on the cavity cover plate.
#10
Quote by jj1565
...for the work of it, i'd rather use a self adhere copper foil, to actually get the best out of the job.

no reason to go half-assed.

note the foil comes out of the cavity, to the screw hole...


Good idea doing the screw hole thing if you don't want to solder a wire to the ground. I had to solder each piece of tape to each other because I didn't get consistent conductivity between sheets otherwise (while testing with a multimeter).

If you don't test it with a multimeter, then there's a good chance you're just wasting time and money.
#11
im not sure about aluminum foil, but i know people do it with like silver and gold to isolate the electronics. I'd assume aluminum would work too since it's all just metal
#12
i used aluminum tape on my last build, and i will on this current build as well.
copper tapes adhesive is conductive, aluminum tapes is not, i did a little write up on here about using it. basically use a soldering iron to make dimples in areas where tape strips overlaps. it melts the adhesive and allows each piece to be conductive to the next. i thoroughly tested it with a voltmeter, it works. and is easier to come by in a bind
#13
Quote by xadioriderx
i used aluminum tape on my last build, and i will on this current build as well.
copper tapes adhesive is conductive, aluminum tapes is not, i did a little write up on here about using it. basically use a soldering iron to make dimples in areas where tape strips overlaps. it melts the adhesive and allows each piece to be conductive to the next. i thoroughly tested it with a voltmeter, it works. and is easier to come by in a bind


Looks like a learning opportunity for me here.

If aluminum tape isn't conductive, then how can you test it with a voltmeter.

Not being a smart-ass, here; I would think that you'd get readings of 0 or 1 (depending on whether you measured continuity or resistance, if the aluminum tape wasn't conductive. So I'm asking to see what I may be missing about this...
#14
Quote by jetwash69
Looks like a learning opportunity for me here.

If aluminum tape isn't conductive, then how can you test it with a voltmeter.

Not being a smart-ass, here; I would think that you'd get readings of 0 or 1 (depending on whether you measured continuity or resistance, if the aluminum tape wasn't conductive. So I'm asking to see what I may be missing about this...


think you misread, maybe i didnt explain it well =p
aluminum tape conducts, but the adhesive used on it does not.

so stick one piece on top of another, and the two dont "connect". the adhesive is in the way essentially. so if you use a bunch of strips to shield, theyre all separate, not connected in with the grounds. if you use your iron to make dimples, it melts the adhesive, and pushes the pieces together.

so i shielded, tested for continuity on one side of the cavity to the other (through several strips). no continuity.
do the dimples, test again, and voila!
#15
Quote by jj1565
plus you realize you have to adhere it to the guitars cavity with spray or paint on glue.

heavy foil, dont use non stick foil, over lap the foil, and solder to it like said.

BUT imo,
for the work of it, i'd rather use a self adhere copper foil, to actually get the best
out of the job.

no reason to go half-assed.

note the foil comes out of the cavity, to the screw hole.

and the guard like said..


thats all for nothing if you dont solder those peices together.
#16
Quote by W4RP1G
thats all for nothing if you dont solder those peices together.


you mean individual strips? thats what my thing above was about. copper tape has conductive adhesive, so if theyre stuck together, theyre "connected". no soldering needed
#17
Quote by jj1565
...post w/pics...


Hmmm, 22 frets...MIA Strat? 6 point trem, but could be a Highway 1 or an American Special. But the saddles don't say Fender. No, none of those probably ever came w/a swimming pool route. And they definitely never have a side mounted input jack.

And the 1 volume, 1 tone pick guard probably are original, amIright?

OK, is it a Yamaha Pacifica 112? Survey says...
Last edited by jetwash69 at Sep 26, 2011,
#18
Quote by xadioriderx
you mean individual strips? thats what my thing above was about. copper tape has conductive adhesive, so if theyre stuck together, theyre "connected". no soldering needed

Oh i didnt read all that. Navigating the forum on my cell is kind of tricky. Good point though, im going to have to get some of that conductive adhesive copper tape.
#19
Quote by xadioriderx
think you misread, maybe i didnt explain it well =p
aluminum tape conducts, but the adhesive used on it does not.

so stick one piece on top of another, and the two dont "connect". the adhesive is in the way essentially. so if you use a bunch of strips to shield, theyre all separate, not connected in with the grounds. if you use your iron to make dimples, it melts the adhesive, and pushes the pieces together.

so i shielded, tested for continuity on one side of the cavity to the other (through several strips). no continuity.
do the dimples, test again, and voila!


OK. That would make sense hypothetically. Does the copper tape I posted have conductive adhesive? Because that's what I put in my Squier, but I had to solder the pieces to each other because there wasn't consistent continuity without the solder.

The other question is would the adhesive's conductivity degrade over time (like its adhesion will)?

Seems like a best practice to just solder the pieces together regardless, even if it's not essential over the short term.
#20
i read through the reviews looking for an answer, one guys says it has conductive backing. i would assume any guitar-specific tape would have it.
as for the time question, not sure if it will degrade.. but if its all conductive, then if any part is touching, it should be fine. i cant imagine a piece coming off and fully floating around, youd have bigger problems
#21
Quote by xadioriderx
i read through the reviews looking for an answer, one guys says it has conductive backing. i would assume any guitar-specific tape would have it.
as for the time question, not sure if it will degrade.. but if its all conductive, then if any part is touching, it should be fine. i cant imagine a piece coming off and fully floating around, youd have bigger problems


Good point. Although even if there wasn't any adhesive at all, it might still stay in place OK from the ridgity of the material holding the bends. That's why it's a good idea to start from the bottom and work your way up the sides.

Still, doesn't hurt anything to lay the solder because that's a lot easier than taking it all apart again later.

#22
Quote by jetwash69
Hmmm, 22 frets...MIA Strat? 6 point trem, but could be a Highway 1 or an American Special. But the saddles don't say Fender. No, none of those probably ever came w/a swimming pool route. And they definitely never have a side mounted input jack.

And the 1 volume, 1 tone pick guard probably are original, amIright?

OK, is it a Yamaha Pacifica 112? Survey says...



$40! and light enough for the little kid i gave it to after i fixed her up a little.

so smart


Quote by W4RP1G
thats all for nothing if you dont solder those peices together.



like said, they test fine, because of the nature of the tape.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


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Last edited by jj1565 at Sep 26, 2011,
#23
Quote by perszzac
does aluminum foil work as sheilding? it would go in the cavitey on a strar with just a p90 in the bridge and an on/off switch for controls


Does Al foil work? Yes it can. Is it the best material to use? Not by a long shot.

It's thin, tears easily and crumples like nothing else and you cannot solder directly onto it.

Like stated before, conductive adhesive backed copper sheet is best. Its thicker than Al foil, far easier to work with and can solder directly onto it.

Here's some links to the kind of shielding I do to my guitars:

Pickup cavities
Control Cavitiy
Switch Cavity
Switch Cover Plate
Control Cavity Cover Plate

The copper shielding combined with good star grounding works like a complete charm. Noise and buzz becomes just about inaudible.
Last edited by Phoenix V at Sep 26, 2011,