#1
hey...

(I recently moved into student accomodation in a flatshare with 4 others but I like to play acoustic guitar for many hours in a day. while fingerpicking or doing scales etc is quiet enough to do, struming, even softly the guitar is too loud (it is a dreadnought) and people can hear it and I feel bad because its disturbing them

I don't want a travel guitar, I want a full scale acoustic but not dreadnought body which hopefully is quiet enough. I have been playing about a year and also have a fender standard strat but I don't like playing it not plugged in...it sounds too weak. and plugged in it gets very loud so I try to only play that in short bursts plugged in.)

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above line is just background

so anyone know what body types I can get for acoustic that aren't dreadnought? price range about £200-400 ($300-500) depends how much I want it. if it has a pickup or electronics installed it is a big bonus to me and id consider paying a little more.

don't suggest me silent or travel guitars please. im not too keen on plastic backed but maybe you can talk me around...id also like a full scale neck if possible
#2
When I had to play super quiet for a 6 month period, I used a Marshall MS-2 to drive headphones with a Strat. If I had to do it again, I'd do the same thing, but with an MFX pedal or some computer thing like Guitar Rig or AmpliTube. There's all sorts of ways to drive headphones better than the MS-2.
#3
A dreadnaught is designed to have more bottom end than a smaller guitar. However, the bass output isn't the noise problem. It's the midrange and high end! These won't lessen all that much with a smaller instrument. It takes very little energy in the mids and highs to produce a lot of perceived loudness. Bottom line, a smaller body guitar likely isn't the answer.

Very thin picks will reduce volume, but tend to generate a lot of clickety, clack sounds which might be annoying. Thin picks also tend to detract from your holding technique due to their flexibility. (I tend to grab a thin prick when confronted by a very fast difficult rhythm, IE The Who's "Pinball Wizard").

Another suggestion might be a feedback plug. You know, the rubber jobbie they stick in the sound hole that prevents the guitar from getting pregnant. Oops, I meant feeding back.

Here's a search page at "Musicians Friend" for "sound hole covers"; http://www.musiciansfriend.com/sound-hole-covers-for-guitar It's worth a shot, and it's a whole lot cheaper than another guitar.

If the reviews are any indication, the "Planet Waves Screeching Halt" is the clear winner.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 25, 2011,
#4
a soundhole cover or a sock inside the guitar might help a lot more than a slightly smaller guitar. i play smaller guitars, and every one of them is more than loud enough to annoy the neighbors. you could try the yamaha silent guitar...
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
Quote by Captaincranky
...Another suggestion might be a feedback plug. You know, the rubber jobbie they stick in the sound hole that prevents the guitar from getting pregnant. Oops, I meant feeding back. ...

ROTFLMAO
#6
Quote by patticake
a soundhole cover or a sock inside the guitar might help a lot more than a slightly smaller guitar. i play smaller guitars, and every one of them is more than loud enough to annoy the neighbors. you could try the yamaha silent guitar...


I'm with Patticake, my OMs could drive the neighbors crazy. At work, I put a rubber band woven through the strings by the nut, that really quiets it down, even more than a feedback buster.
#7
Quote by mloywhite
I'm with Patticake, my OMs could drive the neighbors crazy. At work, I put a rubber band woven through the strings by the nut, that really quiets it down, even more than a feedback buster.

Could you please upload a photo of that?