#2
If you're reading sheet music written in C then yes. Concert pitch is just how the pitch being played actually registers. 2nd fret on the 1st string in standard tuning is F# concert pitch. That same 2nd fret on the 1st string in D-Standard is E concert pitch.
#3
And by in C i mean in standard tuning it would sound the same as a piano reading the same music. Not the key of C.
#4
Quote by Usernames sucks
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concert_pitch

Does this work for guitars and basses as well? For example if my guitar are tuned to d-standard, does the concert pitch become Bb?


Uh.

Concert pitch is always concert pitch. A=440.

If you tune your instrument differently, then the A immediately below middle C is on a different place in your instrument, but it's still the same A. You don't re-name the notes on your guitar when you change the tuning.

This is a little complicated because the guitar is actually a transposing instrument. (We play middle C, third fret of the fifth string in standard tuning, an octave below middle C on a piano.) That being said, if you tune your guitar a full step down, then A is no longer your open fifth string, it's the second fret on your fifth string. But you don't call it "Bb." It's still A.

(There is a little bit of weirdness because some guitarists - particularly those who tune down a half step - sometimes, when only talking to other guitarists, talk about their guitar as if it were tuned standard. However, the moment you start talking to a musician with a different instrument, it's incumbent on you to recognize that you're out of concert pitch, and to call notes and chords by their actual names. If somebody's talking about "concert pitch" they're talking relative to A=440, so if you're down a step, that note - called A - is on the second fret of your second-lowest string.)

If you're just playing by yourself it doesn't matter. But a discussion of "concert pitch" implies that you're trying to relate to other instruments, so call pitches by their name, not by what the location on the fretboard would be if you were in a different tuning.
Last edited by HotspurJr at Sep 26, 2011,
#5
Not to hijack, but what i don't understand is why we need to transpose instruments. We have concert pitch so all instruments will sound the same/play in key with each other. But a Bb instrument will say they're playing a D when they're playing a C, for example. Why not just call it a C? I'm probably completely wrong, and maybe it's because my lack of knowledge of instruments other than guitar, but it doesn't seem to make sense to me >.<
#6
Quote by greeneyegat
Not to hijack, but what i don't understand is why we need to transpose instruments. We have concert pitch so all instruments will sound the same/play in key with each other. But a Bb instrument will say they're playing a D when they're playing a C, for example. Why not just call it a C? I'm probably completely wrong, and maybe it's because my lack of knowledge of instruments other than guitar, but it doesn't seem to make sense to me >.<

It has to deal with the actual history and construction of the instrument that determines the pitch.

You may be reading a A on standard notation, but what you hear on a transposing instrument, when playing that A, is extremely different.

A guitar, in my mind, is a transposing instrument as well as a standard instrument. The fets on the strings do in fact change the pitch they represent when you down- or uptune the strings.
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#7
Quote by greeneyegat
Not to hijack, but what i don't understand is why we need to transpose instruments. We have concert pitch so all instruments will sound the same/play in key with each other. But a Bb instrument will say they're playing a D when they're playing a C, for example. Why not just call it a C? I'm probably completely wrong, and maybe it's because my lack of knowledge of instruments other than guitar, but it doesn't seem to make sense to me >.<

its to deal with making it easier to write and read music for the instrument. we dont really notice it much on guitar because its transposed by an octave so the notes are the same, just a different octave, but it makes it easier to read on sheet music.
#8
Quote by Mathedes

A guitar, in my mind, is a transposing instrument as well as a standard instrument. The fets on the strings do in fact change the pitch they represent when you down- or uptune the strings.


This is true. So what?

It has nothing at all to do with being a transposing instrument.

The note locations on the fretboard when you change your tuning, such as that the same sounds have the same names. That's NOT a transposing instrument.
#9
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
its to deal with making it easier to write and read music for the instrument. we dont really notice it much on guitar because its transposed by an octave so the notes are the same, just a different octave, but it makes it easier to read on sheet music.


I suppose from that point it makes some sense.

Quote by Mathedes
You may be reading a A on standard notation, but what you hear on a transposing instrument, when playing that A, is extremely different.


But that's my point, why can't we change instruments so that when a transposing instrument plays an A, they're playing an A?
#10
Quote by greeneyegat
I suppose from that point it makes some sense.


But that's my point, why can't we change instruments so that when a transposing instrument plays an A, they're playing an A?

I try not just to link to websites and send people out on their own when explaining things like this, but this article explains it better than I could.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#11
^Thanks. So, basically, some transposing instruments are made differently. An example used in that article is clarinets, which can come as A, Bb, C, or Eb. So rather than learning different fingerings for different pitches for each kind of instrument, we transpose the written notation?
#12
Quote by greeneyegat
^Thanks. So, basically, some transposing instruments are made differently. An example used in that article is clarinets, which can come as A, Bb, C, or Eb. So rather than learning different fingerings for different pitches for each kind of instrument, we transpose the written notation?


Exactly.